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Pat "Greywolf" sure knew his way around a torque wrench and pretty much any tools and test equipment, so sometimes I take/prefer real world experience over a service manual or lawyer talk. There has been MANY here who have torqued to spec and had the rear axle gall, the spec is simply too high and not necessary. I've marked every single axle nut I've installed "on 3 Stroms" since reducing the torque and applying anti seize, I haven't had so much as any discernable movement of the nut. I don't change out the oil drain plug crush washers or use a torque wrench to "snug" the drain plug bolt.....NEVER so much a drip or stripping of theads. :)
 
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Big B, as I said in my last post's opening statement, "Just my experience here." Yours may vary.
But I base my experience on hundreds, if not thousands of vehicles over a 4+ decade career, both 4-wheeled and two.
Just so you know, the only hero Ive had in my life is my dad, who at age 92+ is still with us...:)
 

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A thousand chain adjustments and tyre changes later I did not even know what a galled axle nut was until I joined this forum.
After a wet and muddy ride I would be out in the rain washing the bike down and spraying it liberally with WD40 (wiping the brake discs clean) before putting it away. To not do so was to find a disaster in a weeks time.
Perhaps its also because I ALWAYS smear every axle and thread with a smear of grease or coppercote before reassembly.
I have never galled or had to replace a nut, and never had issues removing the axle from a wheel. I do not use a torque wrench.
 

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Brockie, maybe you have a light touch or a calibrated arm. The ones Ive had seized were torqued by gorillas who would stand on the breaker bar while tightening, thinking to do otherwise would lead to instant death and destruction. I use a torquewrench because I have them, I know they are calibrated, trust the wrench more than my arm depending on time of day and physical condition. And...why wouldnt I use one?
I smear coppercoat on the axle so it doesnt stick in the wheel bearing inner races. I've had to beat out a few axles where this wasnt done. But on my bikes and friends whose bikes Ive serviced from the get-go, Ive never had a galled axle.
 

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If you are using an anti-seize product make sure its not graphite since it may cause galvanic corrosion. Not sure what grade of stainless steel Suzuki is using for the axle and the axle nut and that could be part of the problem. If anyone has a metallurgist buddy see if he can determine what SS grade is being used for the axle nut.
 

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Hi guys, mine is a 2017. I only did one chain adjustment so I've only loosened the bolt once. After reading this thread I went out there to check it out and it loosened up with no trouble but I did apply the anti-seize compound as added insurance for the future.
 

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I still don't believe the rear axle is stainless steel. It's highly magnetic. At least mine is. L2 650. Don't see it rust though. Spark test on the grinder may shed some light on the subject. Chinesium will keep you guessing. :unsure:


Grease works fine too as an anti seize. Seems like it's a good idea to grease the whole rear axle so it doesn't get stuck in the wheel spacers and bearings.
 

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If grease was as good as anti seize, there would not be any anti seize in the world. don't be cheap, get some anti seize.

If tightening fasteners by feel was good enough, they would not use torque wrenches in factorys makeing cars, trucks, heavy equipment, and motorcycles. they do use torque wrenches in factories. I have 3 torque wrenches and use them after I am sure of the proper torque to use. if you own a 'strom check what Greywolf recommends for torque as the shop manual has some errors.

It is not really too complicated.

Cheers

RLBranson
 

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Another test for stainless is to see if it wants to gall and seize. put full torque on a bunch of stainless bolts and nuts and you will see the galling that often happens on strom rear axles.

RLBranson
 

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How many times can you safely reuse a Fuji axle locknut? My shop manual says do not reuse. Does reuse mean remove and reinstall or does it include loosening and re-tighten as well???
 

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I am a level II NDE guy and use a NITON XRF analyzer (PMI) at work. I will confirm the axle and nut alloys next time I have the rear wheel off and publish the result here. I had to replace my axle last year due to excessive galling as well.
 

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I am a level II NDE guy and use a NITON XRF analyzer (PMI) at work. I will confirm the axle and nut alloys next time I have the rear wheel off and publish the result here. I had to replace my axle last year due to excessive galling as well.
What does NDE stand for? Also interested in what a Niton Analyzer is used for? Tia.
 

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What does NDE stand for? Also interested in what a Niton Analyzer is used for? Tia.
Non Destructive Test(ng) Engineer, I'm assuming from the rest of @Railrocker's post.
The Urban Dictionary defines it as Near Death Experience. :eek: Hmmm... now I, too, wonder what a Niton Analyzer is!
 
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Non Destructive Test(ng) Engineer,.... :eek: Hmmm... now I, too, wonder what a Niton Analyzer is!
They come in a pretty wide array of purposes. I've only seen one(not in use) but generally it was explained to me that it was a laser aided metal xray thermometer combo thing. The one I saw was hand held and used to spot check that the raw material that arrived in large quantities was all up to spec. Hopefully, our man will set us straight.
 
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The 650's axle is not made of SS. SS would be both waay too expensive and weaker, plus be prone to galling. The axle is also magnetic, which points to a carbon steel material. Yes, it could be SS 400 series, but that's expensive material and it will rust in corrosive environments. My guess is that the 650 is a higher carbon steel, case hardened, and plated with a dull or bright zinc coating. The zinc is a pretty good anti-corrosion treatment by itself, and if the installer applies a modest coating of grease, it's good to go.

The reason people often bung up their 650 axles, is because the hole for the cotter pin reduces the total effective thread engagement, both on the axle and the nut..
 
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