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Fitted a new axle and nut, on close inspection the damaged thread on the old one was half way down the threaded part...

New axle, plates etc all greased, threaded part coated in copper grease and torqued up to Suzuki specs. It will come off again at the dealer in a month or so for a new rear tyre and chain, if they stuff it, they can replace it.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Do not torque the nut to the Suzuki spec of 72.5lb-ft when using anti seize. Lubricating the thread will over stretch the axle and overtax the threads at that torque. The torque on a lubricated thread needs to be reduced over a dry spec. There have been zero reported problems using 58lb-ft.
 

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Do not torque the nut to the Suzuki spec of 72.5lb-ft when using anti seize. Lubricating the thread will over stretch the axle and overtax the threads at that torque. The torque on a lubricated thread needs to be reduced over a dry spec. There have been zero reported problems using 58lb-ft.
Dropped it by 15%, we'll see how we go.
 

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I joined the galling club today. 2012 Glee with 15000km. It made it about one full turn before stopping dead.
Annoyingly it's too loose to be able to ride it to the shop. I'm not sure about cutting off the nut, not something I've done before.

I had the same problem with my Fireblade many year ago but it was at the dealer getting a new rear tyre, so they did the cutting.
 

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This happened to me a couple months ago. Infuriating. Stopped my whole chain and sprocket overhaul. I searched a lot for a cheaper way but finally just ordered the OEM parts to replace it. And I added the anti-seize. Haven't had to remove the wheel since but it hasn't fallen off!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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August 30, 2017

I would first like to thank all of those who contributed to this Galling Thread. Your comments and recommendations were very helpful to me in my first ever chain adjustment on my new-to-me 2014 DL1000.

NOTE: It does not take much to remove 1/2" of chain slack. I moved my adjustment bolt from one side of a hash mark to the middle of that same hash mark.

Axle and Fugi nut were both slathered with silver anti-seize lube and the Fugi was tightened using a 12 point socket + 18" breaker bar to what I felt was about 60 lbs of torque. When and if I find a torque wrench, I will check my 'feel' torque value.

Thank you all for a no drama chain adjustment.
 

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Combination of torque wrench use and Suzuki's too high torque spec are what cause these problems.
If you just do it by feel you'll be better off. The vast majority of stripped thread problems happen to guys with a torque wrench in their hands.
Is the torque spec too high? Is the torque wrench not accurate/calibrated? Is there lubrication on the thread that is not accounted for in the torque spec? Is the torque wrench being used properly? Torque wrenches don't strip threads; people strip threads.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The problem is that stainless steel tends to cold weld or gall under pressure. Anti seize is not specified, but it should be, as it will prevent galling. Lubricated threads need to have a lower torque spec over dry threads as the lubricant would allow the sane axle stretch with a lower torque.

People who do not check torque wrench settings and calibrations are the cause of torque wrench problems. Also, users need to stay aware and not blindly crank away with a broken tool.
 

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I noticed the motor output shaft has the nut of death on it when changing the sprocket yesterday. Sure would hate to gall the threads on the output shaft! :surprise:
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Those parts are not stainless steel so they won't gall. The usual problems are the nut being too tight and industrial strength thread locker being used. The book spec on the 650 is 105lb-ft even though the same nut is used on the Vee and it is spec'd at 83lb-ft, a much better number. An air or electric impact wrench is a wonderful tool for that nut. Make sure to flatten the bent lock washer as the first step.
 

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I guess you are right, the shaft should be hardened tool steel.

The speedo sensor should keep the big nut from coming loose shouldn't it? 0:)
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The speedo sensor will keep the nut from coming off, not from coming loose.
 

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cutting off the axle nut

Well it looks like I'm a me-too.
When you guys cut off the axle nut did you make the cut:
Perpendicular to the axle?
Parallel to the axle?

In other words did you cut off the end of the axle or just a couple of "flats" off the nut?
Or something else?
Mine is a V2.
 

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Getting ready for a trip, thought I would clean/adjust the chain on my '13 Wee. Well....24 mm socket on a 15" ratchet did NOT budge the nut!!!
Good thing I tried it before have a problem on the road!!! Sprayed some PB Blaster on, see if that does anything. If not, back to the dealer. Maybe sitting on the dealer floor for nearly 5 years with that nut never coming off has something to do with it? Once off, anti-sieze and tighten so I can get it back off!!!
 

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Seems over tight is a problem...Snug it, then just a bit more to line up the locking pin hole w/the castle nut....It ain't gonna go any where...snug is better than over tightened...seems this issue is related to "ham fisting" the castle nut (or if a "lock nut" style nut is used), & over wrenching on it. Any nut will "gall/seize/strip" if over tightened....Go easy big fella...
 

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I just went through this procedure on my 2017 650 And after reading this thread earlier (like months ago) I knew to be
careful and not to over do it. Removed the nut (first time since new) And then after chain was adjusted used copper based anti seize
on the axle threads and then torqued nut in 2 stages first at 30 ft lbs and then again at 60 ft lbs. The last little bit was 65 ft lbs
And thats where I left it. Next day I rode 50 + miles with zero issues. I marked the adjusters to see any movement. There was none.

Yes Grey Wolf knew his stuff.

*** Update : just checked and Bike Bandit wants $86 for a new OEM axle and another $14 for the nut Thats $100 friends
For inferior products.
Do yourself a favor and read the post from grey wolf early in this thread. it explains how to deal with this issue.
 

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I have thought of getting the bad axle tested for hardness as there are an unusual amount of these failing and I wonder if there are a bad batch of axles out there..

TM
It's possible there are other complaints being registered at the NHTSA
https://www.nhtsa.gov/fmvss/reporting-information-and-documents-about-potential-defects-retention-records-could-indicate
Might be a good place to start.
 

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Just my experience here, but I have never seen galled axle threads or had a nut seize during removal that wasnt over-tightened by an owner who didnt know a torque wrench from a crowbar, or a shop mechanic that used an impact wrench set to "STUN".
Ive moved the nut on my '14 Vstrom 1000 at least 6 times for adjustments and rear tire replacement. Torqued to 72.5 ft-lbs as per factory service manual, threads clean and dry. Never had a problem. Naturally, torqued enough times the wear of the nut and axle threads will reach a point where the threads will distort, or stretch. Then you could have a thread galling/seizure issue.
If and when that happens on my bike, I'll simply replace the axle and nut and start over with new. I'm not rich, but if I can't afford to replace an axle abnd nut on my motorcycle(s), I shouldnt be riding one in the 1st place.
In the Yamaha FJ09 service manual the exploded view of the rear axle area shows a similar rear axle and self-locking nut. The difference here is that unlike Suzuki, Yamaha doesnt specify that the nut is to be replaced each and every time it is moved.
Speaking with the Suzuki district service rep, he agrees that it's unreasonable to replace a rear axle axle nut @ $26 list price at every adjustment. He recommended torque to the specified setting, and just keep an eye out for wear or looseness between the nut and axle threads. Which is what Ive always done and will continue to do.
When I pointed this my local dealer's service advisor, he agreed there could be a liability issue in not following the service manual's procedures to a "T". I was told they are now replacing the nut every other time rear axle is serviced.
That may not impress a lawyer, but it's what they do. I'll take my chances with my method and not even think about it.
 
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