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Discussion Starter #1
Is the DL650 torque the same 72.5 ft lbs on the castlelated nut and the lock nut. Just replaced my 04 with a 09 and noticed they replaced the castlelated nut and cotter pin with a lock nut on the rear axle. I don't have the 09 owners manual to verify and my factory maintainence manual is for the 04.

Search doesn't give me any answers so I'm guessing they are the same.

Thanks in advance
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The spec is unchanged. I still recommend using anti seize and 58lb-ft to account for the lubrication factor. There are too many stories about galled axle nuts not to take precautions.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The spec is unchanged. I still recommend using anti seize and 58lb-ft to account for the lubrication factor. There are too many stories about galled axle nuts not to take precautions.

Thanks. Saw the posts about the stripped threads. I always torqued my 04 to 72.5 and didn't have any issues for almost 70k miles worth of adjustments and tire changes. Sounds like I was lucky.

Asked about the lock nut because back in my helicopter maintenance days in most applications we would add the drag torque to the standard torque which usually added 15%. This is defiantly not helicopter maintenance.
 

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The spec is unchanged. I still recommend using anti seize and 58lb-ft to account for the lubrication factor. There are too many stories about galled axle nuts not to take precautions.
Hey GW,

Like you, I replaced my Dual Star nut with the 2009 DL1000 fuji nut, plus I added the original washer. Just a curious observation: to me the torque felt kind of vague compared to the larger Dual Star nut. I suppose this was because of the smaller nut outer dimension and the washer. Of course I torqued to the same value nonetheless. I am glad that I no longer need to add a special axle nut wrench to my tool kit. Thanks for that suggestion.
 

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+1 With Greywolf's Advice But With Caveat

Last week, I replaced my rear brake pads by partially (as in, removing the caliper from the bracket but keeping the brake union hose attached) removing the caliper so I can clean the underside of the caliper and re-grease (I used Versachem's synthetic brake and caliper grease) the bolts and sliding pin. I then took the opportunity to remove, clean, and spread some copper-based anti-seize on the rear axle locknut and torqued it to 60 ft-lbs (I improvised because I was using a non-Snap On torque wrench, which conventional wisdom says is the best of the best).

I marked the nut and axle with a black permanent marker and, after a week, noticed that it loosened by about 1 mm.

YMMV, but I still agree with the anti-seize suggestion.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Simple solution.

Don't torque the axle nut.

Just use common sense, and tighten it snugly. The rear wheel isn't going anywhere. The chain pulling forward, and the adjusters pushing backwards are assuring you of that.

B.L.
 

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Simple solution.

Don't torque the axle nut.

Just use common sense, and tighten it snugly. The rear wheel isn't going anywhere. The chain pulling forward, and the adjusters pushing backwards are assuring you of that.

B.L.

Yep. Where the hell do people think that axle is going to go, anyway? :confused:

Over on the vintage Suzuki forums, tales abound of people who blindly trust a torque wrench and a blurry number in a badly translated manual and proceed to snap, gall, and otherwise lay waste to dozens of innocent fasteners.
 

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Simple solution.

Don't torque the axle nut.

Just use common sense, and tighten it snugly. The rear wheel isn't going anywhere. The chain pulling forward, and the adjusters pushing backwards are assuring you of that.

B.L.
Yep. Where the hell do people think that axle is going to go, anyway? :confused:

Over on the vintage Suzuki forums, tales abound of people who blindly trust a torque wrench and a blurry number in a badly translated manual and proceed to snap, gall, and otherwise lay waste to dozens of innocent fasteners.
LOL, you guys are sooo right. Torque wrenches have their place, and most of the time that place is resting quietly in the bottom of the tool box. :)
 

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The spec is unchanged. I still recommend using anti seize and 58lb-ft to account for the lubrication factor. There are too many stories about galled axle nuts not to take precautions.

WISH I HAD KNOWN THIS!!!


I took my rear axel nut off my 05 vstrom 650 for the first time since purchase, about 2 months ago (rear tire was worn a shop is mounting and balancing a new rear for me when I bring them the rim). Anyways the nut was probably over torqued or seized so the threads are damaged on the axel. Not to the point where the axel cannot be used, but I am very nervous so I think I need a new axel....
 

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after much debate, i ordered a new axle for the 05, and the nut from the 2011 from oneida suzuki! hope it gets here soon!
 

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2012 650 Axel

I just had this same thing happen w/ my new 2012 650 I believe. The nut had been stiff from the first change but I had never backed it off more than a couple of turns. It was stiff enough coming off this past weekend that I had to use a breaker bar to "help" it rather than the Craftsman closed end wrenches I'd been using. I pulled it out and about 2 threads on the axel about a 1/2 inch in (flush w/ the outside of the swing arm) were pretty much ruined and the inside two threads on the nut were ruined also. Strangely enough the nut spins off and on by hand just fine and the outer threads on the axel are just fine. It's like there was a bur on the axel or something and it ruined the threads on the nut. After multiple chain adjustments they were pretty much melded into each other. I took it into the shop and they took pictures and within just an hour or so Suzuki had decided to warranty the axel. They did tell me I had to use a torque wrench which I have already but nothing else was said about it. I wonder if the damage was there from when it was originally installed because I had tried to torque it the first time I adjusted the chain and couldn't get it tight. I thought maybe it was because my wrench only went up to 75 ft. lbs. but that probably doesn't make sense now that I think about it. I just ended up snugging it w/ the closed end wrenches but this past time it just bonded itself together and wasn't coming off. The shop put it back on and I am riding it until the replacement arrives.
 

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My theory has been to install with what you might have to use to remove. I use the oem axle tool for both install and removal.. I haven't tried it, but I am afraid I wouldn't be able to get the nut off in a roadside pinch if it had been torqued upon installation. 45 plus years and have never had an axle come loose. Not changing procedure now.
 

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My theory has been to install with what you might have to use to remove. I use the oem axle tool for both install and removal.. I haven't tried it, but I am afraid I wouldn't be able to get the nut off in a roadside pinch if it had been torqued upon installation. 45 plus years and have never had an axle come loose. Not changing procedure now.
Good theory! For that very reason I carry a tool roll containing "real" tools in the side case anytime I venture more than a few miles from home. They are the same ones I break out when it's time for a chain adjustment. I'm not thrilled about the idea of having to use the factory tool kit unless there's just no other option.
 

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Wanna bet that mechanics who have that 'gentle' touch know instinctively how much torque to apply to any given fastener? They can feel how much tightening to apply using a 1/4", 3/8", or 1/2" drive ratchet to a fastener with a certain sized head is correct? They quickly look at the thread pitch, fastener size, and heat/cooling cycles to ascertain how much torque to apply along with whether there is a need for a thread locking compound or anti-seize.
 
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