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The other day I loosened the rear axle nuts and tightened the chain(so I thought). I tightened the axle nuts on both sides to 70 lbs. well I checked the chain again and it seemed loose still.

So tonite I went to loosen the rear axle nuts to tighten my chain again and they won't loosen. My son tried to help and it's like the nuts are on so tight they won't budge. I dunno what we're doing wrong.

My question is, can we still ride the bike even though we don't know how tight or how much torque it is on each side?? Will it mess something up further?

Thanks
 

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I am no expert and I have a Wee not a glee (I think in terms of chain adjustment they might be somewhat similar) but I'll give you my $ 0.02.

- You mentioned that you tightened the chain... did you measure and leave the appropriate slack....for the Wee its somewhere between 2-3cm with the bike on the centerstand.

If not my theory is that the chain might have been too tight and thus the axle bolt is now not perpendicular to the swing arms causing the axle nut to pinch the washer/swing arm.

I might have read somewhere on this forum that the manual recommended 70lbs-ft might be too high. In any case, I say go to town on that nut pull it out and check to see if the threads are still okay and re-adjust the chain.
 

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YOU'RE going to need leverage to break the bolts loose. the wrenches and exstension in the bikes tool kit are not sufficient. the chain is better to be loose than tight. 1-1.5" slack in the chain is what i run. Too tight and it will "whine" and probably do some damage.
 

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I adjusted my chain twice just small increments for stretch since the bike is new. I just loosened the larger bolt on the right side since that is the axle nut. I only hold the left side axle if it is free spinning. And I only tighten down the **right** nut. I think you will need a longer breaker bar then the one in the tool kit to break it loose. Try a 12 inch pipe that the axle nut wrench can slide into.
 

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If you have any signs of corrosion then spray the nuts with "blaster" (http://www.blastercorporation.com/PB_Blaster_Testimon) let them soak in for 10 minutes. Use a long handled "breaker bar" like this one available from Harbor Freight: 1/2" Drive 25" Breaker Bar.

This should break the nuts free. If not then tap the breaker bar with a mallet. You may have to give it a good lick but start with firm taps. I would double check my torque wrench to see if it is really set at 70 ft-lb. Make sure when you re-tighten that the reference marks are at the same distance on both sides. This should prevent misalignment and possibly binding.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sicha thank you for offering your help. I did measure from the same point on each side with a caliper and it was the same number on the caliper when I adjusted the chain. I used the idea from a Dr V-Strom video I watched. So the chain adjustment is equal on both sides.

Also when it came to tools, I used a 250 lb torque wrench adjusted to 70 and a 1/2" ratchet for the other. So the tools I used were not wimpy.

so, I guess I will have to take it to the store I bought it from and they will have to cut it off??

btw, my vstrom is new -bought this past July.
 

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Do chains always need tightening? Mine was at 1 1/2" around the first service time and it's since gone to 1 3/4" and it's holding there. I'm at 3200 miles/
 

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2 to 3 cm of chain slack is right, about 7/8" to 1-1/4". As said above, once broken in it will rarely need readjusting until it is dying.

Sight down the chain off the rear sprocket to be sure it runs off straight is good.

That nut is probably galled on the axle threads. Order a new axle & nut. Twist the old one off or cut it off. Put a dab of antiseize paste on the new threads and torque to about 58 lbs-ft.
 

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I tightened the axle nuts on both sides to 70 lbs. well I checked the chain again and it seemed loose still.
There is only one axle nut (24mm) and it's on the side with the brake disk from the factory (some folks put the axle in the other way). The chain side "nut" is the bolt head (22mm) of the axle.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
PTRider said "Twist the old one off or cut it off."


How?

The nuts are on so tight they won't budge. It's like I need someone who has an air ratchet to see if they can get it loose.

how and what do you use to cut it off? I dunno that I have the know how or tools to do so.

Thanks

I do have a good mind to ask a friend who works at an automotive shop if I bring the motorcycle up there if he can possibly get it off.

gtg to work thanks to all of younfor help
 

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"Twist the old one off or cut it off."


How?

The nuts are on so tight they won't budge.
1/2" drive breaker bar with a piece of pipe slipped over the end. Be sure you don't pull the bike over when you lean on it. (As you probably know well, don't unscrew anything with your torque wrench.) The threads will eventually strip out. Cutting off is best. A cut off disc on a die grinder will do the job.
 

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Put a dab of antiseize paste on the new threads and torque to about 58 lbs-ft.
I didn't specifically check, but if the standard torque spec is 70 lb-ft, and it is on a 'clean and dry threads' basis, then 58 lb-ft sounds about right for lubricated threads.

It's always been a pet peeve of mine how often torque specs are on a 'clean and dry threads' basis because that condition is poorly controlled. Threads not clean, well let me wipe them off...with the shop rag that, perhaps, you used to wipe a bit of oil of the side case the last time you filled the engine? You've now just coated the threads with oil and even an amount small enough that you can't see it will noticeably reduce thread friction.

In almost all cases, what you are trying to achieve with proper bolt/machine screw tightening is a degree of axial stress imparted by torque. But, the axial stress, or stretching, imparted by torque is after that torque absorbed by thread friction. The best way to have a consistent degree of thread friction is to use a lubricant (anti-seize or oil). There are a variety of machine design guides that provide torque values on both a 'clean and dry' and 'lubricated' basis, but for some reason what you find in sources like motorcycle shop manuals is only on the poorly controlled 'clean and dry threads' basis.
 

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As far as tightening both adjuster bolts the same, this is what I do. If the bike pulls to the left when you loosen your grip on the bars, the rear wheel is pointed to the right. In that case, just tightened the left chain adjuster when the chain is loose. A quarter or half turn is plenty.

If the bike pulls to the right, you will have to adjust the right adjuster more than the left when adjusting the chain. Careful, a little does it.
 

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This is one of the most bizarre mechanical situations I have ever heard of in my 45 years of riding and wrenching on motorcycles. As I understand it, you have a less than two month old bike, you loosened the rear axle nut to adjust the chain, re-tightened the nut using a torque wrench, and a very few days later the rear axle nut is completely frozen and unmovable?

I think the newness of the bike and the very short duration from the time the nut was retightened rules out corrosion as a cause. Did you try the suggestion to use a long breaker bar with a pipe on it to try to turn the nut? That's what I would do, using about 3 - 4 foot of pipe as the extension. I've been able to remove even cross threaded nuts using that method.

By asking the following question I am in no way trying to insult your intelligence, but sometimes a bizarre situation has a bizarre cause. And, I have known of people who have done this so it does happen. This is the longest of long shots, but are you certain that when you first tried to loosen the nut you turned the it in the correct direction ("left to loosen," counter-clockwise)? I'm hesitant even to mention this because of the risk of it being interpreted as insulting but I'm not trying to be, but rather only trying possibly to help. As I said earlier, it has been known to happen so it you did that you would not be the first.

To answer the question posed in your original post, if it were me I would not ride the bike until this is resolved.

Good luck.

Mike
Idaho
www.rtwrider.net
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The other day I loosened the rear axle nuts and tightened the chain(so I thought). I tightened the axle nuts on both sides to 70 lbs. well I checked the chain again and it seemed loose still.

So tonite I went to loosen the rear axle nuts to tighten my chain again and they won't loosen. My son tried to help and it's like the nuts are on so tight they won't budge. I dunno what we're doing wrong.

My question is, can we still ride the bike even though we don't know how tight or how much torque it is on each side?? Will it mess something up further?

Thanks
This is one of the most bizarre mechanical situations I have ever heard of in my 45 years of riding and wrenching on motorcycles. As I understand it, you have a less than two month old bike, you loosened the rear axle nut to adjust the chain, re-tightened the nut using a torque wrench, and a very few days later the rear axle nut is completely frozen and unmovable?
Something similar happened for me a few month ago and yes - it's a bizarre mechanical situation on a new bike where the nut always have been torqued correctly.

I did ride my bike while I waited for the replacement axle and nut to arrive - but it's not something I would recommend others to do, unless they feel sure that the nut is tightened properly.
 

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I'd use an heavy duty angle grinder to grind the head off the end of the axle bolt. The opposite end of where the FUJI nut is of course. It would take much longer to grind the whole nut off. :mrgreen: OR you could just grind the locking section of the nut off then spin it off with a large wrench. Of course you should order a new axle and nut beforehand.

I just put a new rear sprocket on and all of those nuts are FUJI nuts too. Luckily none of them got stuck and I put grease on the threads before re assembly.

I've had my axle nut loose about 6 times or so and the grease on the threads is holding up so far.
 
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