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Discussion Starter #1
Replaced the rear wheel and I notice the manual doesn't say to apply anti-seize lubricant to the axle like on my Harley or any lube for that matter. Is this something they missed? Do most of you apply lubricant to the axle?:confused:
Thanks
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I do, could be wrong though! :confused:

As a rule of thumb (there are always exceptions) nearly all fasteners of most kinds benefit with some sort of anti-sieze/lubricant or some level of loc-tite, depending on application.

The loc-tite of any strength prevents moisture/corrosion/rust developing in the threads, thus assuring orderly removal.

Now I am sure I will receive a rash a sht for such a statement. :yesnod:

In addition to that, I would bet there is an entire book written on the subject.
 

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I have had history of axles rusting (not to the inner bearing race but between the bearings) and having sufficient effort required to acheive removal. However these were likely on MX and Trials motorcycles where they are exposed (submersed in the case of trials) to muddy water on a regular basis.
 

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Carl, when we tighten a threaded fastener, we might be concerned about how hard we squeeze the parts together (clamping force) especially where a gasket is used, and the stretch of the fastener...stretched tight but not beyond the yield point where it does not return to the original size. We really don't care how tight we twist it, but the twisting force, the torque, is the quickly way of tightening the same every time.

Picking a torque spec depends on the diameter of the fastener, the thread pitch, the material, the surface finish, and any lubrication. Friction is part of the torque. Changing the lube , thus reducing the friction, (using antiseize where none was called for, for example) changes the twisting force needed to get the same clamping force or desired amount of stretch. A 20% reduction in the spec'ed torque is a rough rule of thumb for threads where antiseize is used in normally dry threads to avoid over stretching due to the friction reduction. So...use care when antiseize is used where it is not spec'ed.
 

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Old Surf Dog-are you asking about the "axle"? Or, the axle "nut"? I always put a thin coat of grease on the axle itself before inserting it through the wheel/frame. It makes life simpler at tire removal time.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The axle threads have caused problems. I have yet to hear of an axle and wheel bearing sticking. http://www.stromtrooper.com/general-v-strom-discussion/23698-rear-axle-thread-galled.html
Yer scaring me here Graywolf! I did put some anti-seize lube on the axle after doing a little more YouTube research on the matter but then I torqued it to the manuals spec. I then backed it off a smidgen to put the cotter pin in. Hope I don't have an issue with the treads galling!
Old Surf Dog-are you asking about the "axle"? Or, the axle "nut"? I always put a thin coat of grease on the axle itself before inserting it through the wheel/frame. It makes life simpler at tire removal time.
I was referring to the axle in my question and I did go ahead and put some anti-seize on it. I wonder why the manual doesn't mention to?:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After reading about the galled threads I think I am going to go back out to the garage and back off the nut, add a little anti-seize and torque it to about 60 lbs.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I was referring to the axle in my question and I did go ahead and put some anti-seize on it. I wonder why the manual doesn't mention to?
The axle is stainless steel. It won't rust to the bearings like some axles on other bike have. Based on the bearing appearance on my bikes, I think the bearings are also stainless. The threads can cause a problem because SS on SS under high pressure can cold pressure weld, or gall.
 

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good plan

After reading about the galled threads I think I am going to go back out to the garage and back off the nut, add a little anti-seize and torque it to about 60 lbs.
good plan - also - if you did torque it higher - you risk deforming the side plate under the axle nut.

My axle nut has a modest torque and is a castellated nut with keeper pin - its never moved.
 

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Wow, got deep. That's cool.
My.real world involves deciding what size crescent wrench that babies going to see and how hard is it going to be getting it apart on the side of the road. Gave the torque wrench away a few years ago.
 

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Wow, got deep. That's cool.
My.real world involves deciding what size crescent wrench that babies going to see and how hard is it going to be getting it apart on the side of the road. Gave the torque wrench away a few years ago.
Then you will want medium-tight, and make sure the side of Crescent labeled "mm" is pointing outboard because it's a metric nut.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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you risk deforming the side plate under the axle nut.
I torque mine to around 70 dry and it seems the side plate is a little bent in. I just reverse it each time, which ain't that often. I have always lubed the axle though. I just thought it needed it. I am much more concerned about my oil drain that I might have over-torqued last fall. (I have changed the oil since then).:yesnod:
 

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My 05 axle is very attractive to a magnetic, hence it is either steel or a 400 series SS which can rust. Realistically, Suzuki would not use the expensive SS material for the axle, and most likely, the axle is zinc plated steel. The bearings are most likely steel as well, due to cost considerations.

As to whether axles will corrode and seize to the bearings... Maybe not so much on the typical use of a V Strom. For dirtbikes, oh yeah, it can and does happen. A buddy had to use a Sawzall to cut his axle & spacers to remove the wheel. And it's not just axles- linkage and swing arm bolts get corroded as well and it's NOT pretty.

At my garage, axles always get a light coat of grease at reassembly.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I can't imagine the axles are just plated. Plated steel is not prone to galling like SS is and scratches on the surface do not show rust. The alloy used will only develop a light coat of corrosion on the surface. I have yet to see one report of serious rust or a seized bearing. I've seen plenty of reports of galled axle nuts.
 

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Axle grease...

I always apply a light coat of standard grease to the rear axle before re-installing. It helps with the installation, it inhibits corrosion, and it just makes me feel better. Very light coat. The rear axle threads are cleaned and anti seize is applied. I have an aftermarket, full-sized nut and it is torqued to 60 pound/feet. If you travel far enough/long enough to make chain adjustments on the road, you will find it becomes difficult to loosen that rear nut by hand with the tools supplied with the bike. Much beyond 60 pound/feet and you will need to stand on the wrench to loosen it. Tightening it by foot will risk over-torqueing. Get a full-sized aftermarket nut, use anti seize paste, torque to 60 pf.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
After removing the nut and adding anti-seize and re-torquing to 60 ft. lbs the nut looks like it is in almost the same spot as 72.5 lbs without anti-seize. Test rode it about 40 miles and all seems fine. Taking it on a 1500 mile test ride this weekend thru the Sierra Nevada passes! YeeHaw!
 

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The often mentioned mucked-up axle nut and axle threads are because the slotted nut doesn't have a lot of good full continuous threads and can get over-torqued. Plus, much of the stress on the axle threads are right on top of the cross drilled hole. 60 ft-lbs torque is probably quite a bit for a cheesy nut & thread combination such as on many Suzukis. It's just not a very good situation.

Whoever thought it was a good idea to put a cotter key in the axle nut, should be punched in the head. LOL

Most likely, the axle is something like 4130 high strength steel.
 
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