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Discussion Starter #1
I have no idea how but I was trying to adjust my chain today. I put the bike on the lift, got my wrenches out and loosened the axle nut about 2 turns, just enough to move it with some resistance. I proceeded to turn the allen screw about a 1/4 of a turn to tighten the chain, made sure both sides were the same according to the swingarm hash marks, then I tightened the nut back down. After tightening the chain seemed to tighten up to where I felt it was too tight so I went to loosen the axle nut to readjust and it would not move, I mean stuck tight. The axle itself didn't seem tight in the swingarm though, which I thought was odd. Anyway, both the axle and nut are stripped.
Now, the bike only has about 5000 miles on it. I bought it from an individual with only 1500 miles on it so it has original tire and chain and sprocket (there's no reason this nut has ever been off the bike). The second thing is ever since I've had it I've been perplexed with the chain adjustments, it seems I would get it right, tighten it up and it will have moved, so this is not the first time I've had to go back and readjust it. I'm wondering if the thing has been stripped the whole time I've had it.
Anyway, new axle and nut are almost $100 so that sucks.
 

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Bad news but not a new thing. Google axle nut galling; stromtrooper and you will find a number of references. Galling is friction welding. It can be avaerted by applying an antigalling compound to the axle and nut.

Does your bike have a castellated nut? If yes replace it with the newer self locking nut that has a lot more thread surface area that will help to prevent galling together with the compound. Also reduce the torque by about 25% to compensate for the thread lubrication. (See Greywolf's many postings on this matter).

Look on e-bay for a cheaper replacement axle. Good luck!

And once it's all fixed check out NEVA 19 for a great meet in the NE next year. The thread is not up but will be come early next year.
 

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Hostler,
What you have, is a used bike which had a gorilla mechanic who over-tightened the rear axle. It could have been the previous owner, could have been from the factory, or it could have been the dealership mechanic. It's not uncommon for a low miles used bike to have something mucked up, but you have nothing to gain by figuring out who. All you can do is grin + buy the replacement new parts, and keep in focus that you saved some $$ buying a used bike. Just buy the parts and move forward.
 

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Hostler -- I had the same problem. I never over-tightened, but it still happened. (Could have been done by the dealer / factory before I got it, I suppose.)

After replacing the axle, I started using anti-seize and torquing to 58 ft-lb per Greywolf's recommendation somewhere on the forum and as others mention here. I don't even think about it anymore, and just re-apply anti-seize when I remove the nut for tire changes.

Another tip I picked up somewhere on the forum: when you get your new axle, insert it from the right side, rather than the left -- makes it easier to align the axle / brake / wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all of the knowledge and good advice. I shopped around a bit and ended up getting an axle and nut from Bikebandit. Total was $103.
The more I think about it the more I think it was like that when I got it. I'm more than capable of screwing something as simple as a nut and bolt up, but in this case I feel I inherited the issue. I've wrestled with that silly thing every time I've adjusted the chain. I would adjust it, tighten it and then the chain would either loosen or tighten almost immediately and I would have to do it again.
 

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My guess is you inherited the problem.

That's the bad thing about getting something used. Usually the PO doesn't want to spend $$ or deal with some problems.

Didja end up cutting the nut off the axle?

Never had it happen to me, because I knew about it beforehand. I took the axle out and greased it up good everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My guess is you inherited the problem.

That's the bad thing about getting something used. Usually the PO doesn't want to spend $$ or deal with some problems.

Didja end up cutting the nut off the axle?

Never had it happen to me, because I knew about it beforehand. I took the axle out and greased it up good everywhere.
Fortunately I didn't have to cut it, I braced one wrench against the paddock stand and actually stood on the other to back it off. The bike, myself and the stand almost fell over twice when the wrench slipped off. My wife stopped by the garage door while I was doing this and asked what I was doing, I told her " tightening my chain", she just shrugged and walked off. I'm positive and thinks she married an idiot, for some reason I get some satisfaction from that.
 

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The only times Ive had seized axle nuts is when the nut was tightened by someone standing on a breaker bar or using an impact wrench to tighten the nut.
I'll tighten my axle nut to spec using a torque wrench, and not worry about it. If, through repeated torquing the nut or axle threads wear to the point where they get loose, pulled and distorted...I'll simply replace the axle and nut! What I won't do is lube the threads and use a reduced torque setting regardless of whoever else recommends or does that.

So many times Ive tried to remove axle nuts that would turn
1/2 turn and seize because the threads had been pulled. And wheel studs that seized and snapped off for the same reason.

You know youre in for it when you ask the owner what the rear axle nut torque is on their bike and they come back with either.."How would I know?" or "#4 on my Ingersoll air impact".
 

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The Fuji nut idea is OK I guess. There are many types of lock nuts, safety wires etc...

My SV has the cotter pin nut on the rear axle.

Even if this nut came loose hopefully the rider would be smart or aware enough to know there is a problem back there.

I suppose it takes just one to get the lawyers out.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Another tip I picked up somewhere on the forum: when you get your new axle, insert it from the right side, rather than the left -- makes it easier to align the axle / brake / wheel.
Why?
Not doubting, just not sure why.
I could see it to just push the old axle out with the new one but I thought I would pull it all apart and take a look at things while I've got the nut off and axle out.
 

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I install the axle in the direction as shown in the factory shop manual. Never had a problem lining up spacers or caliper holders. Easier for me to torque the axle nut as I'm not pulling up on the torque wrench and trying to lift the rear of the bike up at the same time. Safer.
Many times when a bike is on my Pitbull stands I use their accessory wheel lift--works like a charm and is effortless.
Before that I used a ratchet strap over the seat and through the rim to raise and hold it in position while installing the axle.
 

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Why?
Not doubting, just not sure why.
I could see it to just push the old axle out with the new one but I thought I would pull it all apart and take a look at things while I've got the nut off and axle out.

I have the axle nut on the right side because I'm right handed. Can straddle the wheel and use my right hand with the tool.

As far lining up the wheel spacers and brake carrier use something to raise the wheel like a chunk of 2x4.
 

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Have always wondered whether adjustment to the chain when the bike was hot from riding has any effect as to galling. Seems that it just may according to this:

Stainless Steel Galling / Locking Up / Freezing Up

Heat and high RPM removal/installation can absolutely have an effect. Question is, should we be seeing more or less of this known issue and why do some experience it while other's carry on trouble free?
 

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Gert posted a link that, in turn, linked to this thread:

https://www.stromtrooper.com/general-v-strom-discussion/23698-rear-axle-thread-galled.html

Which I think may be the definitive thread on this problem. Well worth reading from beginning to end, IMO; it will take about an hour. It has very good information about why it's helpful to apply a bit of anti-seize on the axle threads and how to adjust torque accordingly; it also explains the change from castle to fuji locknuts.

Lots of good advice and source material.


Vinnie
 

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BTW, I have a DL 1000 so that's what I'm primarily interested in. I spent a little time looking at parts fiches... the part number of the lock nut is different for the 2018 1K although the axle number is the same. I don't know what the difference is. 2014 to 2016 use the same nut.

Vinnie
 
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