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After I bought my 6k DL1000 with 34,000 miles I decided to do a total maintenance of the bike based on the maintenance schedule requirements. It's a lot to bite off, but I want to "know" where I stand without trusting those I don't know. One of the tasks is replacing the air filter. Man am I glad I did this. See attached filter.

My question is that I found a puddle of oil in the bottom. Is this just because the filter was such a disaster, or do I have other problems? Also, the little "sponge filter was soaked in oil. What's the best way to clean this sponge filter?

Finally, I've been reading on the fuel line replacement and the throttle body boot attachment issue. I bought the fuel line parts (thanks GW), but I need to remove the air filter box. Before I play Doctor, is there a set of instructions for removing the filter box?

Thanks in advance. This place is a godsend!
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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You get oil in the airbox if you drop the bike with the engine running, especially on the left side. Even with no drop, you'll get oil in the sponge as that's where the crankcase vents. I've never seen much coverage of removing the airbox beyond it may be easier to leave the front intake stack on the throttle body and separating it from the airbox rather than removing the stack along with the airbox. To remove it with the airbox, the hose clamp holding it tto the front throttle body has to be loosened. To remove the airbox without the stack, compress it smaller than the airbox hole and separate the two pieces. It's easier on the rear to loosen the hose clamp on the rear throttle body. From there, it's a matter of removing wiring connectors and hoses. Label them and there's a better chance you'll get things back together without a FI fault, vacuum leak or oil from the crankcase vent breather hoses getting everywhere. DAMHIKT.

I've never heard of a need to replace a fuel line with intact ends. If you are just replacing the air filter, you don't need to take the airbox off unless you have a fuel leak on the short hose between the throttle bodies.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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It does. It's a matter of washing, drying and re-oiling with K&N filter oil if you want to keep it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks!

You get oil in the airbox if you drop the bike with the engine running, especially on the left side.
It was dropped on the left side.

To remove the airbox without the stack, compress it smaller than the airbox hole and separate the two pieces.
I read about this. With your added explanation, I now think I understand.

Lol, I'm tempted.

If you are just replacing the air filter, you don't need to take the airbox off unless you have a fuel leak on the short hose between the throttle bodies.
I was thinking of doing the "fuel leak" repair since I was here with an open shot at it.
 

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My question is that I found a puddle of oil in the bottom. Is this just because the filter was such a disaster, or do I have other problems? Also, the little "sponge filter was soaked in oil. What's the best way to clean this sponge filter?
If a left-side drop per GW is ruled out, I'd guess that the oil in the airbox is due to the plugged air filter. With the air filter severely plugged the breather sponge and tubes are going to see much more suction on each intake cycle and this would probably draw oil into the airbox.

I cleaned my sponge with kerosine and it was fine. I ended up replacing it with a new sponge anyway because I want to cut it to fit the odd shape of the pocket in the airbox that it goes into. I noticed that the rectangular sponge doesn't fit well in that pocket. My theory is that burning oil at speed is caused by vapors sneaking past the sponge and getting burned instead of condensed on the sponge. You might consider some sealant in the sharp corners to prevent blow-by vapors from bypassing the sponge per this thread. http://www.stromtrooper.com/v-strom...-consumption-where-does-go-2.html#post3322074
 

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Cowboys aint easy to love
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When dealing with fuel systems -- hoses/lines, filters, fittings with any "irregularities" -- examine each item carefully for "bits and pieces" (like little black balls or chunks or shreds of rubber) BEFORE you do any general, wholesale cleaning. Somewhere back in time there was a bad batch of fuel lines and hoses -- the linings could/would separate and shred from the outer shell -- even causing collapse of the line in the worst cases -- and "flow" with the fuel. The result could be seen as the bits and pieces that collect at any restriction. The bottom line is that the hose is the main problem and its badness is hidden in its interior and out of sight. Replace the damn thing completely if you see any debris evidence.
 

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On my K2 1000 ... the crank vent is just above the water pump housing on the rt side of the engine and connects to the right side of the airbox.... in a right side tip over oil would be able to come into the airbox thru the crank vent.... also...and most likely, oil in your airbox is from the previous owner over oiling the K&N air filter and it dripping into the airbox.... buy a recharge kit for it and you're good to go. :)
 

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Your bike will run sooo much better with a clean air filter....

The K&N air filter has the gasket as part of its plastic frame. It might be a good idea to put a thick smear of silicone grease under the edge of the frame where it contacts the lower air box just in case some dirt tries to sneak through.

A tip if your remove the airbox--do count all the disconnects, and recount as you reattach everything. When you're putting the bike back together, connect the tank and leave it up on its strut while you start & idle the engine. If you don't have the warning light, great, put it all back together. If you get the warning light, you now know you forgot to connect something and don't have to take everything off again to get to the air box. No need to ask how I came up with this routine...:(
 
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