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The biggest killer of oil is fuel so replacing the filter will do nothing to help this and since we now run EFI the chance of getting unburnt fuel in the oil is greatly reduce.

Changing oil on a EFI motor early is a waste of cash and doing it late will not hurt.
 

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The biggest killer of oil is fuel so replacing the filter will do nothing to help this and since we now run EFI the chance of getting unburnt fuel in the oil is greatly reduce.
...
EFI engines run rich on cold startup cycles so EFI vehicles that idle a lot to "warm up" or do mainly short trips end up getting fuel (and water) in the oil and should have oil changes more often. Not as bad as carburetor vehicles but still an issue with cars and bikes.

..Tom
 

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Changing oil on a EFI motor early is a waste of cash and doing it late will not hurt.
The biggest killer of oil is HEAT. Persistent hot running that occurs in heavy congestion in cities, hot ambient temperatures, high altitude, heavy loads, extended high RPM running, etc. Off road is considered severe duty. Oil capacity also plays a big part. Many larger capacity engines have 4 quarts of oil. The VStrom 650 is barely 2.5 quarts and you can only realistically change barely that much. Enduro bikes with thumpers only have 1-1.5 quarts of oil capacity and they require very close oil change intervals. Those bikes are also ridden in severe duty cycles 99% of their life.

And changing oil early is not a waste of money nor does it hurt the engine. Extending the oil change interval just means the oil's viscosity has broken down quite a bit and you're still circulating it throughout your engine. Also, the chances of particles floating around old oil, and now circulating throughout your engine can partially or fully block oil passages, starving certain areas of your engine of the lubricating properties of its oil. Tell me how this will not hurt.
 

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@OCL I am with @Rolex here.

And, YUUP, heat is a killer of oil. The number one reason I suggested and always use Synthetic oils.

We also drifted from the premise of this thread. "I am traveling, what is the least maintenance I can do?"
 

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The biggest killer of oil is HEAT. Persistent hot running that occurs in heavy congestion in cities, hot ambient temperatures, high altitude, heavy loads, extended high RPM running, etc. Off road is considered severe duty. Oil capacity also plays a big part. Many larger capacity engines have 4 quarts of oil. The VStrom 650 is barely 2.5 quarts and you can only realistically change barely that much. Enduro bikes with thumpers only have 1-1.5 quarts of oil capacity and they require very close oil change intervals. Those bikes are also ridden in severe duty cycles 99% of their life.

And changing oil early is not a waste of money nor does it hurt the engine. Extending the oil change interval just means the oil's viscosity has broken down quite a bit and you're still circulating it throughout your engine. Also, the chances of particles floating around old oil, and now circulating throughout your engine can partially or fully block oil passages, starving certain areas of your engine of the lubricating properties of its oil. Tell me how this will not hurt.
Vehicles that have oil coolers, in particular oil-coolant heat exchangers, don't suffer from the extremes in oil temperatures. From my automobile experience (VW, Audi,Porsche) I've seen the difference of oil temperature with and without Oil Coolers. Going back to 1983/ 1984 I was selling VW and Audi. The US made Rabbit GTI had a 90 hp 1.8 liter engine and an oil temperature gauge in the center console but no oil cooler. If you paid attention to the oil temperature gauge it was pretty much an average speed indicator. If you got on the highway and drove at 100 kph (62 mph) the oil temperature would go to 100°c and stay there. If you went to 120 kph (75 mph) the oil temp would settle at 120°c. If you drove at 140 kph (almost 90mph) the oil temp would settle at 140kph, which was the oil temperature redline and the point that oil started deteriorating. Back then VW had the coolant based oil coolers in the German made cars with same engine (a version of Jetta and Scirocco.) The oil warmed up quicker from a cold start as the coolant warmed faster than the oil so heat was transferred to the oil. Somewhere approaching 100C heat would start flowing from the engine to the coolant. The oil temperature ended up being very stable staying within a range of something like 95 to 105°c (I forget the exact numbers but if I'm of it's only a little bit.)

First gen Stroms had a air based oil cooler. 2nd 2012- 20? Have a coolant based oil cooler. My 2015 (2014 to 2016?) DL1000 had no apparent oil cooler (no it did not have a coolant based oil cooler). 2020+ DL1050 have the coolant based oil cooler.

Stroms with oil coolers shouldn't have an issue with oil overheating at highway or higher speeds, and Strom's with the coolant based system should not have any issue with oil overheating in traffic.

..Tom
 

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@V-Tom , I am getting lost in your post. What are you trying to say? That oil temp is a non-issue in Stroms?

I assume with your post following right after mine, you are discounting my advice. If you aren't, that's fine too. I offer the following for consideration by the collective.

Conventional oils start to breakdown at around 120C/250F.

Synthetics are good to in excess of 325F and higher for shorter duration.

Whether you are running an air or liquid type oil cooler, no oil cooler, an air cooled bike, or a liquid cooled bike, almost all oil temperature sending units are mounted in the sump or other area where oil is guaged in quantity. Meanwhile your oil is circulating through the cylinder head and the valve train picking up a lot of higher temperatures, that it then transfers to the larger quantity of oil in the sump. The sump is in essence a radiator. The significance of this is oil is exposed to temps much higher than your gauging point as it moves through the engine.

If your making an argument that the better heat resistance of a synthetic oil to oxidation and cook off is not needed in a water cooled engine, I will respectfully disagree.
 

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@OCL I am with @Rolex here.

And, YUUP, heat is a killer of oil. The number one reason I suggested and always use Synthetic oils.

We also drifted from the premise of this thread. "I am traveling, what is the least maintenance I can do?"
If traveling on a motorcycle...I would say it is wiser to be more diligent with maintenance Given he's relying on his bike to get him home.
 

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If traveling on a motorcycle...I would say it is wiser to be more diligent with maintenance Given he's relying on his bike to get him home.
I am 180 degrees away from you. Every bolt you touch, every filter you try to remove is a "potential" for a big problem. If something falls off or gets loose, maintain it. Oil, coolants, brake fluid.......I am not touching them until the comfort of my home or until it is absolutely necessary. An early oil change..........not me until home.

An extended oil change will not stop a bike........low oil would.
 

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I am 180 degrees away from you. Every bolt you touch, every filter you try to remove is a "potential" for a big problem. If something falls off or gets loose, maintain it. Oil, coolants, brake fluid.......I am not touching them until the comfort of my home or until it is absolutely necessary. An early oil change..........not me until home.

An extended oil change will not stop a bike........low oil would.
If you think like that you better not leave home.
 

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I use synthetic oil and I don't worry about the oil change interval. If it gets to around 10,000 kms, maybe but usually I just change it once per year or if the shifting gets a little notchy (which to me is a good indicator). Is it abuse? Could be. I have 4 bikes so the Vstrom doesn't get much more than 10k kms per year on it. My Honda ST gets 30-40k kms per year and it gets changed once a year as well. KTM gets about 10k kms/yr and it gets changed once per year. The Blackbird.....poor thing. Lately it is getting only about 1,000 kms /year so I change it every other year.
When was the last time you heard of a Vstrom engine failure due to not changing the oil often enough?
To the OP.....don't worry about it. Changing oil every 4,000kms accomplishes only one thing.....more money for the dealer, less for you.
As my long time friend (and Honda/Suzukie dealer) said (regarding Hondasvanyway). "you could probably run Brycreme in the crankcase and the engine would be OK. They are built that strong..." Whether it applied to Suzukis or not, I can't say, but he never said that Suzukis were weak in the engine department.
 

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If you think like that you better not leave home.
What are you anticipating on a long trip that can't just be done before leaving home?

If a bunch of 500 mile days put over me a little over the oil change and air filter change intervals, who cares? It's not worth the time hassle and risk to me doing some stuff roadside. If I do change the oil on a roadtrip, I'm probably not going to change the filter because I don't want it taking up space in my luggage.

Syringe full of brake grease, chain lube, a quart of oil, tire plug kit, hand pump, spare fuses, spare fuel filter, stock toolkit and a good screwdriver/multitool are all I ever take with me on a trip because they're all I've ever needed in ten years with a vstrom as my only vehicle.
 

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My father has always done his own repairs and servicing and noticed a big improvement in the condition of his oil when he moved to a EFI motor, his thinking was they crank and start quicker and when the ignition is shut down so is the fuel system, this stopped the unburnt fuel washing down the cylinders and settling in the oil.

In 1996 he purchased a new V6 VR Holden and decided to test his theory, at 1000ks he changed the oil and compression tested every cylinder, keeping a close eye on the oil he settled on a service interval of 30,000ks.

Every service he again compression testing every cylinder, keeping notes of this along with his fuel consumption and oil usage, nothing ever changed on that car, I don't use it anymore but I still have the car, it has 365,000ks on the clock, the motor has never burnt oil & the compression is the same as it was at 1000ks, his trial convinced me I don't need to rush my service intervals so I don't.

I know many that will change their oil early but then push their chain and sprocket to the limit, a broken chain will do far more damage to a motor than a late oil change.
 
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4 qts Motul 300V ($70USD) + OEM oil filter ($14USD) = $90USD(tax) divided by 3,000 mi = 3 cents/mile
AND I'm 15 lbs overweight. Cut back on Twinkies, buy more oil changes. Duh
 

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Lots of people spend more money at Tim Hortons on coffee in one year than l spend in 5 years of regular(extended) maintenance.Doasyouwanna,oil is Cheap;& easily changed on Vstrom.
 

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4 qts Motul 300V ($70USD) + OEM oil filter ($14USD) = $90USD(tax) divided by 3,000 mi = 3 cents/mile
AND I'm 15 lbs overweight. Cut back on Twinkies, buy more oil changes. Duh
You are assuming that cost is the reason for extending the service interval. It may be, but I expect there are many other factors as well.
 

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My father was in the auto parts game my entire life, parts and oil were free so his experiment had nothing to do with costs.

He believed the average punter was being shafted and roped into keeping a industry alive.
 
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You are assuming that cost is the reason for extending the service interval. It may be, but I expect there are many other factors as well.
Agreed and concur. My 'big' adventure runs are maybe 1,500 mi, so I've never had to calc for an oil change on the road. Plus, a little spoiled living in a community where Amazon regularly delivers. Plus+, these days I transpo the bike to the destination adventure, then ride. Truly spoiled.
 

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If you think like that you better not leave home.
I think like that AND I do much traveling on my motorcycle. I carry an extensive tool kit, extra common fasteners and on a few extended trips, I needed to carry an extra oil filter to do a change on the road. I have changed out tires on the road. Chains and brakes to.

Many people seem to have lost the original premise here, deferring maintenance on LONG trips. There is a difference between repairs and maintenance.

I meticulously stick to 5,000 mile oil change intervals when I am not interstate traveling. I am not suggesting extending OCI routinely for any other reason.
 

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I change oil once a season, usually in late winter, and ridden around 7000+mi/11,000km. I've used Suzuki Ecstar R9000 10W40 full synthetic exclusively, and change the filter with an OEM each time. New crush washer each change; comes with the kit. Kind of guy I am. Chain is lubed each tankful to ~400mi/650km or after rain/washing with DuPont Teflon chain spray. Very little residue on the wheel and swingarm and less glop behind the sprocket cover. I clean it with a lint free rag once or twice a season. OEM Spark plugs have ~24000mi/38,000km, I've got iridiums ready to go in. This is also Fluid Year: Brake, coolant, fork and motor oil.
All the annual and longer interval maintenance gets done pretty much on schedule, Valve shims were done last year.
 

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@V-Tom , I am getting lost in your post. What are you trying to say? That oil temp is a non-issue in Stroms?

I assume with your post following right after mine, you are discounting my advice. If you aren't, that's fine too. I offer the following for consideration by the collective.

Conventional oils start to breakdown at around 120C/250F.

Synthetics are good to in excess of 325F and higher for shorter duration.

Whether you are running an air or liquid type oil cooler, no oil cooler, an air cooled bike, or a liquid cooled bike, almost all oil temperature sending units are mounted in the sump or other area where oil is guaged in quantity. Meanwhile your oil is circulating through the cylinder head and the valve train picking up a lot of higher temperatures, that it then transfers to the larger quantity of oil in the sump. The sump is in essence a radiator. The significance of this is oil is exposed to temps much higher than your gauging point as it moves through the engine.

If your making an argument that the better heat resistance of a synthetic oil to oxidation and cook off is not needed in a water cooled engine, I will respectfully disagree.
I understand what you are saying re sump temperature vs oil temperature in the cylinder heads, etc. I also know that the big part of the reason Porsche went to liquid cooling was so that coolant can run around the multi valve cylinder head to keep the temperatures down. That would tend to cool that oil somewhat as well.

I'm saying that because Stroms are liquid cooled and most have an oil cooler, oil temperature isn't nearly as big a deal as it is in air cooled bikes. Assuming everything is working fine they aren't going to overheat in traffic and high oil temperatures at high speed are a non issue. (The German cars I have sold are designed to run flat out all day long on the Autobaun and every bit of training I had in the 80's said that 140°c is the danger point for oil in those engines. That's why they have the oil coolers.) Short trips with the oil not getting to operating temperature, idling and poor quality gas are likely much harder overall on oil that fast running.


Certainly my 2006 DL650 which had about 185,000 km / 115,000 miles when I took it to Death Valley had no issues riding in 120+°F temperature and had no issue heading home from Utah to near Toronto, Ontario running at 80 to 90 mph on the interstate all day long in temperatures in the 80's to100°f. (Like many DL650's it used oil at high speed slabbing. That didn't change much in the heat.)

Anyway I have ridden two of my Stroms over 200,000 km with no issues so there certainly doesn't seem to be any issues with oil. (I know that isn't even close to high mileage compared to some out there. How long do you expect your Stroms to last?) does any of this oil talk rally matter in the real world?

..Tom
 
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