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Discussion Starter #1
About 2 weeks ago, in the middle of a ride, my brother's Vee2 started leaking fluid from the lower clutch pump ( a.k.a. clutch release cylinder).

Long story short, he took it to the dealer for an emergency repair and found A LOT of mud, sand and stuff into the pump. It made its way inside the rubber seals and caused the leak. After quickly cleaning and refilling, the clutch system came back to operating condition. It worked fine since. Today, we received a new pump, and decided to replace it.

We took our time and removed maybe a spoonful of dirt from the chamber, and the pushing pin was coated with a thick layer of grease and mud. Whenever the clutch lever was pushed, dirt would go inside the rubber retainer in the engine, and when it was released, dirt would come inside the seal of the pump.

After a quick inspection, we found out the clutch push pin runs unprotected less than half and inch from the front sprocket. :surprise: No wonder the clutch pump chamber was filled with the nasty stuff. The two draining holes in the cover plate are just not enough and the way the pin is constantly showered by the chain, is less than amusing.

Prior to reassembling. we decided to cover the pin with a rubber hose. The hose is long enough to cover the pin completely and won't move when the clutch is operated. It's loose enough to let the pin move freely but not too wide to get trapped by the chain.

Would you like to share your impressions?

Thanks.
 

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I can see another recall....... :furious:
 

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this setup has been around for eons. They (Suzuki and all the other makers basically) are not about to change any time soon.
should be part of your monthly clean to do inside the countershaft sprocket cover.

Tom R
 

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I want to see a picture of your fix. Regardless of suggesting this be a normal maintenance item, I would like to see what a preventative fix would look like.
 

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Find some rubber tubing that's JUST a loose fit over the shaft, cut it to length, slip it over. Forget it.

The 650 has a similar problem but without quite such serious consequences.


Pete
 

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Just had mine apart and cleaned the area thoroughly. The pushrod does seem rather "exposed", and grime will obviously work its' way along. I seem to remember an earlier Suzuki I owned had a casting separating the pushrod area from the sprocket cavity. What size hose did you use? I.D and O.D if at all possible. Cheers :smile2:
 

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Find some rubber tubing that's JUST a loose fit over the shaft, cut it to length, slip it over. Forget it.

The 650 has a similar problem but without quite such serious consequences.


Pete
Bring back the cable, I reckon!
 
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Horrible title for thread, as the design is not unreliable. Make the mod like you did, use less gooey and sticky lube, and keep the slave area clean per regular maintenance. It is really that simple.....seriously.
 

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8mm I.D fuel hose....problem solved! :smile2:
 

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IMO, none of these fixes or a 'monthly' preventative cleaning should be necessary on a bike these days. If this is indeed a problem, it's very disappointing.
 

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If you are getting that much "goo" on the clutch pushrod you are either lubing the chain too much or too often or both or using a lube that flies off easily. Yes, there can be buildup in this area. Putting a cover like you describe over the pushrod is an old school fix.

UNRELIABLE?

Didn't leave you stranded. That is my definition of reliable.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The clutch system failed. Should we not have a bit of mechanichal skills, a tow service should have been used. And this bike is less than 8 months old, for Pete's sake.

Must confess I had no idea this system has been used since the first litre strom. Actually, thought it was introduced in th Vee2.

Maybe it's not that bad and has worked fine for many people. But a system design so prone to contamination is, IMHO, poor to say the least.
 

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I agree with those who say give the thing a periodic clean and maybe use less chain lube, however I'm guilty of having not checked mine since the bike was new 16,000 kms ago :serious: I do a reasonable amount of dirt riding and have done a lot of very wet road riding since the Monsoon kicked in here in Darwin.

So I thought I'd go take a look.
The following might provide some clearer idea as to what the OP was talking about. I can see both points of view (clean more regularly versus provide some added protection).

This is the offending area after slave cylinder and plastic cover removed and I'd cleaned it up.



This is what I found when removing the plastic cover after first removing the slave cylinder.



The photo below is with just the slave cylinder removed. The plastic cover hides most of the crud behind it.



Photo below shows the inner rubber diaphragm seal on the slave cylinder. You can see it's been doing its job keeping the crud away from the slave cyclinder piston.


And the image below shows the 8mm I.D rubber tube I've used to provide the shaft a little more protection as the OP had suggested might be useful. I agree that under the circumstances, it certainly can't hurt.


Hope this assists those who were wondering.
Bill.
 

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Nice one NTBill, did exactly the same job on mine yesterday. Mine looked identical to yours when I pulled it apart, lots of crud :frown2:
 

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What did you use to clean that area? I'm sure chain cleaner or a degreaser will work just fine but is there anything that shouldn't come in contact with that area? And did you use a brush to remove it after spraying it?
 

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My fix for a 2012 DL1000 clutch rod leak issue. I did a write up in first gen DL1000 section. I havent had any problems since. Jim in Ojai ca
 

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WD40 or kerosene to clean that area, be sure to leave the push rod in the seal when doing that.
 

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Really silly design.

This bike is an "adventure bike"... riding dirt roads is what these bikes are about.

Putting an exposed push pin, slave cylinder seals and push rod seals right in front and BELOW the front chain sprocket is really stupid.

Chains pick up dirt and it's flung off right where the chain flexes the most..... yes that's the front sprocket.

Covering the push pin with a plastic tube is a dam good idea and you'd think Suzuki your add this stock seeing as it would cost pennies.

One thing that will really help keep this area clean is using a high tech chain lube. The best I've used on my chains is Dupont Chain Saver. It's a high tech lube that has amazing self cleaning characteristics. Used for a while it will even clean a chain that had been lubed badly.

Covering the pin with a plastic tube helps, but even that will get caked up and bent out of place sooner or later. The way dirt gets into that are and then gets baked solid is a pain.

Chainsaver is a game changer. Just use it nice an regularly.



When I used it on my V-Strom there was almost no accumulation of [email protected]#t in the sprocket area.

Other issue with having the push pin in that spot is that it can be broken if a tough rock gets thrown through the sprocket area. That is no fun at all:

http://www.stromtrooper.com/dl650-dl650a-2004-2011/79472-broken-clutch-pushrod.html

Snapped chain can also brake the push rod and getting the broken part out of the engine block is no fun.... major tear down

https://www.reddit.com/r/SVRiders/comments/2hufsm/my_clutch_push_rod_broke_off_inside_my_2002_sv650/
 

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What did you use to clean that area? I'm sure chain cleaner or a degreaser will work just fine but is there anything that shouldn't come in contact with that area? And did you use a brush to remove it after spraying it?
My preference is to use Kerosene. Simply splash it on with an old paintbrush, toothbrush, neighbour's cat...whatever works best.
For this sort of area (external) I then hose it off with water.

I also use kero for cleaning the chain.
There's differing schools of thought on what to use and each to their own, however I've never had probs with Kero.

Regards the design...
I went searching and it seems a fairly common design for hydraulic clutches.... so it's not limited to the DL range of bikes.

I guess for those unfortunate enough to bust a chain, they also get to enjoy no clutch when the push rod gets busted by the chain in the process....
Bill.
 
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