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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings Stromtroopers -- for the 2012+ dl650, the sag specs for the rear end with rider & cargo calls for 35 - 50 mm, and 10 - 15 mm without rider & cargo. With preload maxed out & dampening at factory specs, I have 65 mm of rear sag with rider & cargo and 15 mm of sag without rider & cargo. The rider & cargo weight is 230 lbs. The weight without rider & cargo includes about 23 lbs of tools, bash plate, etc.

GW (rip) indicates that raising the links makes the spring more progressive. He also indicates that the sag should be in the correct range before installing raising or lowering links. I will installing raising links in order to get more ground clearance for my low hanging bash plate. About 5 percent of the time, I'll challenge the suspension with terrible roads & trails.

QUESTIONS: What does it mean to have a more progressive spring? What are the pitfalls of continuing to ride with too much rear sag? Can I adapt my riding style to offset the pitfalls of too much rear sag? What are the pitfalls of raising the links even though I have too much rear sag? What is the correct & cheapest way to fix too much rear sag?

P.S. Suzuki should put you guys on the payroll.
 

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If the shock is appearing crapped out, get it rebuilt. Sasquatch, Adventure Power Sports, LLC can make it all better. He can give you a spring for your weight requirements.
ASt a nominal cost too. raising links without a properly operating shock is a waste of time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
notacop -- I've seen others here recommend Sasquatch. How can i tell if the shock is crapped out? I'm not a technical rider and everything seems fine, except I have too much rear sag; 60 - 70 mm versus 35 - 50 mm called for. From other posts I've seen here, many folks crank the preload to the max without even measuring for sag....because the suspension for the dl650 is known to be weak.

I will install raising links to improve ground clearance, and I'm curious if that'll effect the suspension in any way. I'll report back here in a couple of weeks with my findings. I weigh 185 lbs, the top box weighs 30 lbs, the rear seat carries 20 lbs, and there's 12 lbs in the tool tube. With all the weight in the rear, maybe I shouldn't be surprised about too much sag.
 

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You might just need a stronger spring. I didn't notice the mileage on your bike, but Most shocks dont fail until 50K+. Did mine at 55K(Failing then) and wish I would have done the spring sooner.
 

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On my bike a friend pushed on the back of the bike and it sproinged up and down easily. No mo damping.
I had gotten used to the feel as it deteriorated.
If the shock looks wet and feels greasy/oily, maybe it's bled to death like mine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
nvr2old & notacop -- my 2015 dl650 has almost 25K miles. I'll keep my eyes on the shock for oil leakage. It would be nice if I could reduce sag by simply changing the spring. Eventually, I'll contact Sasquatch (adventurepowersports) about a stronger spring -- "custom shock springs (no adapters needed, unlike our competitors) rate based on customer's needs": $149. Then I'll sort out the labor cost for the install or if I'm capable of doing the install. Happy trails.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Motorcycle Consumer News, Setting Sag by Kevin O'Shaughnessy: he recommends "use the spring calculator at racetech.com (RT - Digital Product Search) to determine the proper springs. The calculator will give the suggested spring rate based on your weight, bike and riding type. It will also give the stock spring rate and a list of available spring rates. You will notice gaps between the rates. If your stock spring and recommended spring both sit between two of the available rates, dont change it. If the available spring rates split the stock and recommended, purchase and install the closest available spring to the recommended value. As a note, street and off-road sag can be measured on front and rear. "

I just used the racetech.com calculator. The calculator requested the rider weight, but it did not request info about the amount of cargo the rider carries. This surprised me because my dl650 sag is only a problem when I add 60 lbs of cargo to the top box and passenger seat.

Someday I will investigate further. For now, I am focused on if & how raising links will effect the suspension and handling. For pre 2012 dl650s, GW (rip) said that raising the rear or lowering the front improved handling.
 

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If your sag can't be dialed in in the stock position, your existing spring rate is not good for your load and raising or lowering the bike with dog bones may not help. The sag is important for lots of reasons, not just ride height. There are lots of articles about why it is important, so google is your friend here.

*** Edit, got corrected by the next post***
I believe raising links will make the spring rate even worse for you since the leverage on the shock changes and you are actually putting more force on the shock. I may have this reversed, but you can verify with sag measurements before and after. With the same preload setting, does the sag get better or worse? If it gets better then maybe you can dial it in properly, if it gets worse, then you don't have a chance to make it better.

Maybe the raising links will work for you, maybe they won't, but it's the cheapest thing to try. If all you want is more ground clearance and you find the rest of the suspension performance to be fine, then the dog bones could very well solve your issues.
 

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Lowering links cause the spring(Linkage Ratio) to soften the spring even more than it as. Raising links do the opposite and stiffen. I ran 5/8" raising links on my 650 for 30K and liked the added ground clearance. This was after the shock was rebuilt(w/ heavier spring) and the preload was on the lowest setting for day rides. I'm 180(200+ w/ all gear) and the bike was at 550 with farkles. With 90# camping gear I moved the preload up 2 rings.

PS- I removed and still have the raising links(Sold the 650). If your interested they would be available at a reasonable cost.
 

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Lowering links cause the spring(Linkage Ratio) to soften the spring even more than it as. Raising links do the opposite and stiffen. I ran 5/8" raising links on my 650 for 30K and liked the added ground clearance. This was after the shock was rebuilt(w/ heavier spring) and the preload was on the lowest setting for day rides. I'm 180(200+ w/ all gear) and the bike was at 550 with farkles. With 90# camping gear I moved the preload up 2 rings.

PS- I removed and still have the raising links(Sold the 650). If your interested they would be available at a reasonable cost.
So based on this post, the raising links could help with both of your problems. Seems like a good route to give it a shot. I do think that investing in the suspension upgrades is a good idea, but your request is asking the cheapest way, so it seems like dog bones is the answer you are looking for.

Nvr2old 90 lbs of camping gear??!?!?
 

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So based on this post, the raising links could help with both of your problems. Seems like a good route to give it a shot. I do think that investing in the suspension upgrades is a good idea, but your request is asking the cheapest way, so it seems like dog bones is the answer you are looking for.

Nvr2old 90 lbs of camping gear??!?!?
Yes 90# sometimes. Thats everything for up to 2 weeks. Gal. of water, full camping supplies, chair, maintenance items and clothing. When sticking to hwy. routes a little less. I do a backpacking trip or 2 each summer(50-100 miles) and even my pack is usually at 50 lbs.
 

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Yes 90# sometimes. Thats everything for up to 2 weeks. Gal. of water, full camping supplies, chair, maintenance items and clothing. When sticking to hwy. routes a little less. I do a backpacking trip or 2 each summer(50-100 miles) and even my pack is usually at 50 lbs.
OP listing 60 and yours is even higher, I need to weigh my gear to see where I come in. I always assumed even two up I'm closer to like 30 lbs. of gear I have also done backpacking trips and my load out is very close to when I am on the bike. I have old-ish late 90's gear, which is not ultralight, I bet I am coming in a lot heavier than I thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
nvr2old -- thanks for confirming that the raising links may help with too much sag. GW (rip) indicated that raising the link would stiffen the spring. I will experiment with adjustable links to improve sag (maybe) and increase undercarriage clearance...without rendering the SW Motech centerstand useless.

Fully dressed rider (185 lbs), plus 15 lbs of tools & 10 lbs of farkles...and the sag is fine if I set preload to maximum. However, when I add 50 lbs of cargo, the sag on my dl650 exceeds the 50mm upper limit...and reaches about 70mm.

I'll report back soon, weather permitting.
 

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I hear you Rick, but never having a passenger makes it possible. Passenger, then O yeah.
 
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