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Discussion Starter #1
Geometry was never my strong suit but...
Doesn't raising the fork tubes reduce the trail ? The real point being faster turn initiation on the twisties but perhaps sacrificing some steering stability on gravel and straight line tracking on the freeway ?

Not claiming I know the answer but if my assumptions are correct I don't think I would raise my fork tubes for my riding preferences. Yeah I really like the twisty roads but I really-really hate front wash out on gravel.

Any enlightenment ??

Thanks,
Matt
 

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No thoughts on gravel, but my bike is much more stable on the freeway after raising the forks. I will never put it back to stock.
 

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No thoughts on gravel, but my bike is much more stable on the freeway after raising the forks. I will never put it back to stock.
Same here on my wee, and with the superbrace and the Z6 roadtechs since I don't do dirt i'll never go back.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
How much did you raise them. I am currently raised 10 mm. I thought I would try this since my fork setup now has less sag. My true difference from stock is probably less than 5mm in actuality. My stock sag was around 43mm now at 37-38mm.

No thoughts on gravel, but my bike is much more stable on the freeway after raising the forks. I will never put it back to stock.
 

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Raising fork tubes effect on handling

Hi, You are right about raising the forks through the triples being a big help on turn in,

I can't say that I have experienced it negatively affecting straight line highway or beyond speeds either,

As in all things the trick is to not go to far to the extreme,

I also can't say that with any reasonable well set up bike I have seen it be an issue on the gravel or off road either,

The 5 - 10mm that most people raise the forks should not be an issue at all with handling in my experience,

Enjoy the ride, and best regards,
Blair
 

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Matt, Most of my experience is about 70/30 offroad/onroad. Everything I say here will be directed towards offroad/ dirt:
Typically if you EXTEND the front forks, the front end will not stick as well in the loose gravel.
Its resembles placing more weight on the rear versus the front, and has almost the same handling characterisics.
Although there are some things you can do to the suspension to reign in some of these issues, the strom is very limited with adjustment lattitude.
The one thing you may try that I have always resorted to doing, particularly in very loose conditions (Fresh grading/sand/snow/ heavy mud) is to stand on the pegs, back slighly arched, ass off the seat, (risers help a lot on stroms) place the balls of your feet on the pegs, not your arches, raise your elbows, and keep your weight slightly forward. (Known as attack stance).
The other part that needs consideration is to keep the bike in the midrange, not too low nor high on the RPM's and do not grip the bars tightly. You want the machine to feel loose in your hands, don't force the bike, use your lower body and weighting the pegs (left/right) as needed to control side to side balance, combined with throttle control (this is why you want the midrange, so power is on tap, turn with the rear wheel)turning the bars is mostly useless in very loose conditions, so weight and throttle control will contol direction, keep your feet on the pegs!
Realizing many times tires will be a servere limitation such as Graded gravel vs heavy mud.
I have always found when I get that little twitch in me ass due to changing conditions, I tend to be a tad more on the aggessive side that submissive...at least in the dirt.
I realize this sounds a little different to many, and have been critisized over this before, and granted the strom is no light machine, but give it a shot sometime.
Hope it helps
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Matt, Most of my experience is about 70/30 offroad/onroad. Everything I say here will be directed towards offroad/ dirt:
Typically if you raise the front forks, the front end will not stick as well in the loose gravel.
Its resembles placing more weight on the rear versus the front, and has almost the same handling characterisics.
There is some room for clarification of terms here. Since we were talking about raising the fork tubes; the effect is the LOWERING of the front end.
When you say "raise the front forks" and "place more weight on the rear" I think you are talking about the opposite: the raising of the front end.
Are you also saying raising the fork tubes-thus lowering the front end- will put more weight on the front (obviously) and cause better sticking/tracking in the gravel (not so obvious) ?
 

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There is some room for clarification of terms here. Since we were talking about raising the fork tubes; the effect is the LOWERING of the front end.
When you say "raise the front forks" and "place more weight on the rear" I think you are talking about the opposite: the raising of the front end.
Are you also saying raising the fork tubes-thus lowering the front end- will put more weight on the front (obviously) and cause better sticking/tracking in the gravel (not so obvious) ?
Thanks for the catch, thats right, sorry bout the confusion.

"If you extend the front fork the front wheel typically does not stick as well in gravel and has a tendacy to push". I edited the previous.
 

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I lowered my front end (or raised the forks) 16mm due to an error in converting 1/2" to metric, it should have been 12mm.
No issues on asphalt or hard-pack. It turns in much quicker and is stable at highway speeds and above. Loose gravel roads aren't a big deal for me as I don't hit much of it, and I'm a 99.9% road toad. If I was planning on doing more off-road, I'd probably bump them back to 12mm above, or back to zero, it only takes 10-15 minutes.

Edit: I also have a Ricks fork brace installed.
 

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I lowered my front end about 12 mm yesterday and fitted a Rick Hughes fork bracket and man does it feel much less squirrely in the front end now.
Thats pretty close to what I run, I have toyed with fork height to find a happy medium between on and off road, . The clamp seems to tighten up handling onroad at speed, as I see less push coming out of turns under acceleration.
 

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I sure would not argue with Greywolf's wisdom.

I also lowered my forks, and liked the results. I've played with various settings and 10mm and above (15mm max) seem to be about equal, with good results.
 
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