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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Is your bike too low, too high, or are you planning on carrying significant loads and need to raise the bike? If so, this may be your solution.

These links replace the stock linkage arms. The stock linkage arms measure 140 mm center to center. By increasing the length of the arm the back end and seat is lowered. By decreasing the length the back end and seat is raised.

We offer raising and lowering links in both 6061-T6 and 7075-T6 aluminum. Our 6061-T6 aluminum links are 3/8" thick and come with new 10 mm longer grade 8 bolts and washers. Our 7075-T6 and stainless steel links use the stock mounting hardware. Both are stronger than stock and come in a wide range of lengths to lower or raise you bike right where you want it.

They are equally strong and both stronger than the stock links. Some people just have preference so we offer both.


Raising Links

134 mm linkage set - raises rear of bike by 5/8 inches

133 mm linkage set - raises rear of bike by 3/4 inches

132 mm linkage set - raises rear of bike by 7/8 inches

131 mm linkage set - raises rear of bike by 1 inch

130 mm linkage set - raises rear of bike by 1 and 1/8 inch

Lowering Links

145 mm linkage set - lowers rear of bike by 1/2 inch

146 mm linkage set - lowers rear of bike by 5/8 inch

147 mm linkage set - lowers rear of bike by 3/4 inch

148 mm linkage set - lowers rear of bike by 7/8 inch

We will endeavor to keep most these in stock ready to go.

The links can be ordered on our webiste Raising and Lowering Links - AdventureTech, LLC.
 

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Just ordered a set of your lowering links.. If they work as well as your Fork Brace
and mirror extenders I know I'll be Happy!
 

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I am still a bit confused by these. I understand you raise the rear end up, but when you sit on it does it not just go back to normal as the suspension sags?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No the links change the height where the bottom of the shock rides. Without making any other changes, since the shock is still the same length, everything the shock supports either rides higher or lower depending on whether you use a raising or lowering link.

This is a much better way of adjusting height of the rear end than tightening or loosening the preload on the shock spring, because, compared to changing spring rates you shock performance is relatively unchanged.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I am still a bit confused by these. I understand you raise the rear end up, but when you sit on it does it not just go back to normal as the suspension sags?
The seat will lower, but not as much as it would with stock links. The shock spring supports the bottom of the shock and lower link bolt to the same position regardless of the links used.
The links are part of the suspension system. Longer links cause the swingarm to be higher, lowering the bike. Shorter links do the opposite. The links change the height of the bike after the compressed shock length is determined. The compressed shock length does not change regardless of link length.
 

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How does raising the rear effect handling etc? I am 6'5" and would love some extra height as I can easily flatfoot this bike.

Would I be right in thinking that raising the rear has the same effect as dropping the front? The prev Owner dropped the front about 3/4-1" so if that's correct i could raise the rear and front and it would ride the same?

Please point me to a good resource for this if anyone has one.

If it has no downsides then I will be putting in an order for these plus a fork brace and a shelf soon. :thumbup:
 

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I use 5/8" raising links on a 2012 Vee. I am 6' 3". I have a SW-Motech center stand and I can use up my tires and not drag anything except the outer edge of my boot. I did notice slightly less stability when balancing at a standstill with feet on the pegs in extremely slow stop and go traffic where you are going so slow you can hardly ever let the clutch out. I got used to that and forgot about it. My forks are all the way out. Center stand and side stand still work fine, but my bike is still pretty new, so my side stand is about as straight as it can be. I've never experienced the aerodynamic instability that people drop their forks for before installing the raising links.

Bruce
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Roughly speaking of course, yes by returning your front forks to stock height and adding raising links you would experience handling similar to what you have now. It depends on how much you raise the back end.

These handling differences are subtle. They are far less than switching from a sport bike to an adventure bike, to a cruiser.

The difference in height though is substantive. there are a few feedback posts here. Raising and Lowering Links by Adventuretech

and since you are 6'4" you might want to check out the foot peg and control lowering kit. You would probably find nirvana raising the rear end and lowering the pegs and controls.
 

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Vees and Wees benefit aerodynamically from lowering the front or raising the rear. Owners report more stability because of less front end lift and more agility due to the decrease in rake and trail.

Glees are already a little higher in the back due to a longer shock and don't have the ramped plastic piece under the headlights that causes lift. Some people still like the increase in agility from raising the rear but others find it twitchy.
 

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Ack, what size to pick!? Haha.

I will do some research on what size and get ordering.
 

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Thanks for the advice guys. I am 6'3 and was planning on getting the footpeg lowering kit but I may get these as well as my legs felt really cramped in the month or so that I did get to ride.

It's funny how subjective it all is though. Coming from the Ninja 500 I thought it was PERFECT never need to change a thing. A few weeks later i'm wishing it had a higher seat height, lower pegs and maybe the handlebars a bit higher.

These links seem like a cheap alternative to a new seat.
 

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I have always wondered how hard these would be to install, and can it feasibly be done at home without a bike lift?
 

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I have always wondered how hard these would be to install, and can it feasibly be done at home without a bike lift?
It's easy with a center stand. Without one, the bike body needs to be lifted, not with a swingarm stand.
 

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Just installed 146mm Stainless Lowering Links - Beautiful

I just wanted to publicly compliment RichlandRick on his products and customer service. As a new '13 650 owner and a recent relocation to Rick's backyard (turns out we live about four miles apart), Rick spent a great deal of time answering my questions about local dealers, services, etc.

After picking up the bike at Desert Valley Powersports in Prosser, WA (also great to work with) it became readily apparent that my 29 1/2"-on-a-good-day inseam was just a little too short to be as steady as I wanted at stoplights in this city where the wind never stops gusting. I needed lowering links and Rick happened to sell a really nice set of stainless ones. Rick let me arrange to pick up the links at his shop, then gave me a half hour discourse on how to set my bike up for long range riding and how to deal with everything from the wind to head buffet and beyond.

I installed the links the next day (Rick even offered to come to my place and help, but my schedule didn't mesh with his) Not having a centerstand, I got creative with two ratchet straps around the frame exposed when the seat is removed, then hooked to the tines on a conveniently available forklift. I took just enough weight off the rear tire without lifting the tire off the ground to get the bolts to slide free. All initial bolt loosening was done with the full weight of the bike on the rear wheel. The ratchet straps allowed me to even the bike up while I was lifting the rear.

The entire job took about fifteen minutes, including raising the fork tubes to match the lowered rear. The lowering links did exactly what I needed and I am no longer tiptoeing through the tulips.

Next is to install his fork brace to help deal with these cross winds.

Thanks Rick, your products are great and your customer service is superb.
Ktech_stl
 

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I just wanted to publicly compliment RichlandRick on his products and customer service. As a new '13 650 owner and a recent relocation to Rick's backyard (turns out we live about four miles apart), Rick spent a great deal of time answering my questions about local dealers, services, etc.

After picking up the bike at Desert Valley Powersports in Prosser, WA (also great to work with) it became readily apparent that my 29 1/2"-on-a-good-day inseam was just a little too short to be as steady as I wanted at stoplights in this city where the wind never stops gusting. I needed lowering links and Rick happened to sell a really nice set of stainless ones. Rick let me arrange to pick up the links at his shop, then gave me a half hour discourse on how to set my bike up for long range riding and how to deal with everything from the wind to head buffet and beyond.

I installed the links the next day (Rick even offered to come to my place and help, but my schedule didn't mesh with his) Not having a centerstand, I got creative with two ratchet straps around the frame exposed when the seat is removed, then hooked to the tines on a conveniently available forklift. I took just enough weight off the rear tire without lifting the tire off the ground to get the bolts to slide free. All initial bolt loosening was done with the full weight of the bike on the rear wheel. The ratchet straps allowed me to even the bike up while I was lifting the rear.

The entire job took about fifteen minutes, including raising the fork tubes to match the lowered rear. The lowering links did exactly what I needed and I am no longer tiptoeing through the tulips.

Next is to install his fork brace to help deal with these cross winds.

Thanks Rick, your products are great and your customer service is superb.
Ktech_stl
Good to know. When I find my bike I will be loading it up with Rick's products. I will also be able to swing by his shop and pick stuff up.

I've got about a 30" inseam. What links did you pick up that got your bike where you like it?
 

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I love the 1" raising links, great customer service

Thanks for the advice guys. I am 6'3 and was planning on getting the footpeg lowering kit but I may get these as well as my legs felt really cramped in the month or so that I did get to ride.

It's funny how subjective it all is though. Coming from the Ninja 500 I thought it was PERFECT never need to change a thing. A few weeks later i'm wishing it had a higher seat height, lower pegs and maybe the handlebars a bit higher.

These links seem like a cheap alternative to a new seat.
I have a 32" inseam and have both Rick's peg lowering kit and 1" raising links. The bike fits me much better now, I love the little extra ground clearance... (If I ever put my Wee for sale it won't say 'clean and garage-kept' :).

A note on customer service: When I ordered the raising links I got a quick email from Rick saying that it would take a few days before he can make and send the links. A few days later I emailed to inquire about the status and got a reply within 10 minutes. I still had to wait a couple of more days but I was very happy to get a quick update. Great customer service, great products!
 

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My appreciation to Richland Rick fore all the great products I have purchased in the past including fork brace, mirror extenders, and GPS mount. I had a local dealership instal my recently purchased 1/2" lowering links and lower the front the same amount and I finally feel like my 2012 650 Adventure is my true home.

With a Corbin seat, I can now flat foot at stops (31" inseam) and the concentration needed for maneuvering during parking or storing in the shed has greatly diminished, allowing for a stress free experience. I would never had realized the difference such a minor lowering would cause had I not driven my wife's with a 3/4" drop. I still hesitated for a year as I didn't need that much of a drop and didn't want to fork out the big bucks for Soupy's adjustables.

Thanks Rick for providing a quality product for an exceptional price. I painted the aluminum links black and they look great.
 

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Another kudos to Rick. I got the fork brace, the over-the-dash shelf, and the 1" raising links. All work great, but the raising links are my favorite. I haven't scraped my exhuast pipe a single time since installing them. They were super easy to install and I can go just a little bit faster through the twisty stuff now without worrying about grinding hard parts. :thumbup:
 

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Rick, I asked this in another discussion on a different thread, but I want to repeat it here if I may:

So, with the 1.25" raising link will I actually see the unsprung ground clearance of 7.75"?
 
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