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Can someone explain in detail the procedure for lowering the front 15mm or so down the fork tubes. I know this is a fairly simple procedure, and I'm a mechanically inclined kinda guy, I just don't wanna screw up my steering. Pictures would be helpful. Thanks!
-Klantz
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Put a long piece of wood about the correct thickness between the fork tube top and the handlebar. Loosen the pinch bolts for one tube only on the upper and lower triple clamps just enough to allow the tube to move. Use the wood to lever the tube into position. The other fork tube will hold the bike up and allow adjustment. Then tighten that side and do the other side.
 

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10mm not 15mm. To get rid of the weave at naughty speeds it's 10mm. Did a bit of checking after I found out mine was already done, just wanted to check it was right to do so and 10 is the common figure that came back.

Grrr:)
 

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Hmmm, what is this weave you speak of? :confused:
Above road legal speeds with pillion or panniers the nose apparently 'weaves' and the lowerign the forks 10mm and winding the rear pre load to max makes a stable happy strom. Even one up playing in the twisties this setup is perfection without any running wide in the corners when giving it some stick.
 

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Unless you like a much quicker handling machine. I took mine to the high end of the spectrum at 25mm, 2.5wt folk oil, adjuster showing 3.5 lines and dropped the tire pressure to 24 in front, 26 in the rear. but it might not be for everyone. For me, it helps to load the front end a little more and I like where it is.

jeff
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I've got to say I'm appalled. 25mm is getting to the area where the front fender might crash into the lower triple clamp on a hard bump. 2.5wt fork oil will allow sharp bumps to be absorbed easier but the rebound will be too fast. A washboard section of road could pogo the front end. Running tire pressures that low on pavement will increase tire wear and make handling squirrely especially with the steering that quick.
 

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I've got to say I'm appalled. 25mm is getting to the area where the front fender might crash into the lower triple clamp on a hard bump. 2.5wt fork oil will allow sharp bumps to be absorbed easier but the rebound will be too fast. A washboard section of road could pogo the front end. Running tire pressures that low on pavement will increase tire wear and make handling squirrely especially with the steering that quick.
+1 You can't mess with the tire pressures so drastically, a huge risk of self harm in the event of a unforeseen drama.

A lot of R&D goes into tire development, they know what there are doing, one or two PSi can work depending on requirements at the time.
 

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I've got to say I'm appalled. 25mm is getting to the area where the front fender might crash into the lower triple clamp on a hard bump. 2.5wt fork oil will allow sharp bumps to be absorbed easier but the rebound will be too fast. A washboard section of road could pogo the front end. Running tire pressures that low on pavement will increase tire wear and make handling squirrely especially with the steering that quick.
ROTFLMAO....."I'm appalled"..and I'm not at all suprised..next it will be "fabulous"...., you and I are very, very different....and my opinion is that you should really try to ask questions and learn about a subject before you guess at the outcome, because you are plain wrong. My fender doesn't come anywhere close to my fork brace and in matter of fact, I've reduced front end dive considerably, rebound is fairly neutral considering that I still have the stiff, stock springs. This fork is of the oil damped and spring rebound type. Changing the oil has no effect on rebound. The stock tires are hard as rocks, hardest tires that I've ever ridden on . I wish they would wear out so I can justify putting a decent set of tires on it....4200 miles and very little wear in the rear and barely any in the front. Remember, most of my riding is done two-up if you've been paying attention. The steering isn't any quicker, it turns much faster and there is a huge difference. By shortening the wheelbase, it no longer tries to remain upright going into a turn but falls into it much more readily. You might not be used to that, or your style of riding might be different then mine although I can't imagine riding this bike any differently that I ride it...like a 50 y/o man and not like a 19 y/o kid.

jeff
 

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ROTFLMAO....."I'm appalled"..and I'm not at all suprised..next it will be "fabulous"...., you and I are very, very different....and my opinion is that you should really try to ask questions and learn about a subject before you guess at the outcome, because you are plain wrong. My fender doesn't come anywhere close to my fork brace and in matter of fact, I've reduced front end dive considerably, rebound is fairly neutral considering that I still have the stiff, stock springs. This fork is of the oil damped and spring rebound type. Changing the oil has no effect on rebound. The stock tires are hard as rocks, hardest tires that I've ever ridden on . I wish they would wear out so I can justify putting a decent set of tires on it....4200 miles and very little wear in the rear and barely any in the front. Remember, most of my riding is done two-up if you've been paying attention. The steering isn't any quicker, it turns much faster and there is a huge difference. By shortening the wheelbase, it no longer tries to remain upright going into a turn but falls into it much more readily. You might not be used to that, or your style of riding might be different then mine although I can't imagine riding this bike any differently that I ride it...like a 50 y/o man and not like a 19 y/o kid.

jeff
Jeff,

there's a few things here that are incorrect and/or irrelevant or that I don't understand.

1) The fender and/or fork brace aren't what hit if you lower the front end too much. With any more than 15mm of fork tube showing above the top triple the tops of the sliders can hit the lower triple. VERY harsh bottoming when that happens.

2) The stock springs aren't stiff. In fact, they're much too soft. Perversely though, it's very common for that to be perceived as too stiff, since they bottom very frequently and the resulting harshness is mistaken for "too stiff" spring rates.

3) Unless you've gone to stiffer springs and/or thicker fork oil you haven't reduced brake dive.

4) The fork is oil damped, but I have no idea what you mean by "spring rebound". The weight of the bike is supported by the springs, and the motion is damped by the oil. If you change the weight of the oil you change both the compression and rebound damping.
Also don't know what you mean by "neutral" rebound. Rebound has a rate (or speed) which is always positive. Neutral implies a zero point between positive and negative values.

5) Don't know what your recent tire experience is, but mine includes most tires by all the major manufacturers. I certainly wouldn't call the stock tires particularly hard, there's much harder tires out there. I don't have any problem running them out to the edge with no slips, slides or any drama at all.

6) I'm failing completely to understand how a bike can turn in quicker but not steer any faster??

7) Tire pressures in the mid 20s give you higher tire temps, faster wear and a greater chance of bent/broken rims.

BTW, I'm a 50 year old guy who often rides 2-up. :D

I don't mean to sound like I'm ragging on you, although I realize that is does. :( It's just that some of the stuff you've posted could be downright dangerous (the tire pressure and fork tube height stuff particularly), and I'd hate to see someone else setup their bike that way.
 

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Rich, I don't take anything personally on this board. As I've said before, the lack of experience and knowledge by the owners here is vastly lacking...COMPARED to other boards, both auto and motorcycle.

I posted the thread of the guy that OILED his rotors on my SLK board and you can only imagine the response.

I'm not going to get in a point by point argument but in my opinion, you should start at the beginning so.....I honestly think that you should begin by asking Greywolf about the subject of the "front fender might crash into the lower triple clamp" since that's a direct quote from him.

LOL
jeff
 

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My mistake. I was thinking of the entire lower front as the "fender" The lower fork legs are indeed the specific parts that hit first. A cable tie tight around the fork tube above the lower leg will get pushed up by the action of the suspension. It will mark the highest point of the suspension travel following its installation so you'll get an idea of how much travel was used. My point was raising the fork tubes so far can result in a big bang. Whatever works for you Jeff. I'm just concerned somebody else might try the same thing with a poorer result.
 
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