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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all, I was pulling my steering head today on my Super Tenere (I know, not a V-Strom, but this isn't a Super Tenere specific question) when I ran across a dilemma. I posted on the Super Tenere site but it can take ages to get someone to respond to a tech question, so Stromtroopers is always my go-to site.

Anyway, a special locknut wrench is needed to loosen the locknut on the steering head stem. I have the wrench, which is designed to be used with a torque wrench for reassembly. On this wrench is a weird 8 pointed hole, similar to a 6 point Torx bit. My research says this is called a Double Square, which I'd never heard of. I found that a 3/8" ratchet or a 3/8" extension will fit into four of the eight holes in the wrench, but I'm not sure if it's kosher to use the wrench this way. None of the usual places I've looked (Amazon, McMaster Carr, Home Depot, hardware store, etc) sell anything that looks like an 8 point Torx bit that will fit with a 3/8" ratchet. I've only seen a couple places that sell a double square screwdriver bit, but they are way too small (this hole would require a bit around the size of a T55 Torx bit).

Have any of you ever encountered this, and what did you do? Did you just use the 3/8" ratchet/extension, or do you have to use the specific 8 pointed double square bit? And if you have to use the double square bit, do you have a source for them? It's going to suck if I have to put the forks back on without being able to complete my maintenance on the steering head.....

I've attached photos of the wrench and ratchet.
 

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I haven't dealt with this but I wouldn't hesitate to use the ratchet as long as you believe it fits tight enough not to strip out when applying the proper torque.


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Clearly a 3/8" ratchet/extension fits with enough contact area to avoid rounding out the star, especially since only so much torque can be applied by a 3/8" ratchet compared to a 1/2" one.
While I have never seen this setup, would not hesitate to go ahead with your plan.
Reminds me of an M4 carbine receiver extension locking tool.
 

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Hey all, I was pulling my steering head today on my Super Tenere (I know, not a V-Strom, but this isn't a Super Tenere specific question) .....
RCinNC, I find the Tenere thread on ADVrider is as good or better than the YamahaSuperTenere Forum for tech help. BTW, mine is still new, how much grease you find in there when you disassembled it?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I couldn't say, ST: I quit working on the steering head and went back to doing the forks. Surprisingly, the fork oil looked like new; I didn't expect that at 33,500 miles. I'll pull the head tomorrow and see how much grease is there.

If you do yours, be ready to use a breaker bar on the steering head nut. The specs are for, if I recall correctly, 94 ft/lbs, and every bit of that was on the nut.

Thanks for the heads up on ADV Rider. I'm actually a member there, but I don't go there too often. They seem to lean a little too far to the caustic snarky side, and I hate to wade through a ton of BS just to get an answer to something like "what's a double square bit?". I'll have to reacquaint myself with their forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks to everyone who responded about using the 3/8" torque wrench. It seems like a no-brainer, but I wanted to confirm it before I did something stupid and wrecked that wrench. Even on eBay it wasn't cheap, and I'd hate for the bike to be sitting in pieces in the garage while I wait for another tool to be shipped to me.
 

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RCinNC,

There are parts of ADVrider that are snarky, but the Tenere forum is a great bunch of guys. Let me know about the steering head bearings and I am curious if you ever checked the valves yet and what they measured at?

My 2013 went 40,000 miles. I did valves at 30,000 and the exhausts were right on the tight end of the range, the intakes were OK. The Tenere is such a bitch to adjust valves on that I left them alone. I upgraded to a 2015 when I totaled the 13. My 15 just hit 6,500 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hi ST,

I had the valves checked at 31,000 miles, and all of them were within specs. I don't have the sheet that says what the exact clearances were, though.

The steering head's coming the rest of the way off in the morning, and I'll let you know what the grease looked like. I can take a photo; I'll have my camera anyway, since I was taking photos of my new homemade fork spring compressor in action.
 

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Steering head bearings move at near zero velocity. They only need a coating of grease to prevent rust.
 

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RCinNC,

Thanks, just trying to save work. I just did the driveshaft spline pull and lube today. It looked to have enough grease, but since I was changing tires and had it apart, I hit the splines with Moly 60 paste.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
RCinNC,

There are parts of ADVrider that are snarky, but the Tenere forum is a great bunch of guys. Let me know about the steering head bearings and I am curious if you ever checked the valves yet and what they measured at?

My 2013 went 40,000 miles. I did valves at 30,000 and the exhausts were right on the tight end of the range, the intakes were OK. The Tenere is such a bitch to adjust valves on that I left them alone. I upgraded to a 2015 when I totaled the 13. My 15 just hit 6,500 miles.
ST, I finished up the job this afternoon. I took a photo of the upper and lower steering head bearings, but the photo of the upper one came out too blurry to be of any use. I've attached the photo of the lower bearing. I repacked the bearings with Bel-Ray waterproof grease. Both bearings and bearing races looked fine at 31,800 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
That's normal. It's made so that you can use a 3/8" drive beam type torque wrench. It allows for multiple positions of the torque wrench in relation to the spanner wrench.
Yeah, once I got into the job, it turns out that a double square hole like that is about the only way you could use the Yamaha steering locknut wrench with a torque wrench. You have to use the torque wrench at a right angle to the locknut wrench in a very limited space, and you have to use an extension between the locknut wrench and the torque wrench to clear the gas tank. A specially designed socket would have been a lot easier; dunno what the engineers at Yamaha were thinking.
 

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Tapered roller bearings should last practically forever unless the grease washes out or they are badly adjusted.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well thankfully mine weren't afflicted with either of those problems, so I could button them up and not have to worry about them again for a couple more years.
 

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Thank you RCinNC. I assume you have lubed the driveshaft splines. Mine had moly-paste on them still at 25,000 miles but I put more on (Honda Moly 60). I use Moly 60 on the drive flange splines when I remove the rear wheel also.

So far I have been pleased with the quality of parts, assembly and the amount of grease I have found on the STen.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
ST, I do lube the splines on the rear wheel, though as far as I can tell the service manual doesn't call for it. It's more of an assembly aid than anything else. I've never pulled the actual driveshaft though, so I don't know whether there's grease there.

I misprinted the mileage on those bearings in the previous post; it's 34,800 miles, not 31,800.
 

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I lube all splines, regardless of manual requirements (for corrosion as well as friction).
The driveshaft is pretty easy, with rear wheel off remove the 4 bolts and slide the assembly back. I do it every 25,000 miles or so.

I got anal on realigning it when putting it back on. Slide unit back into the swingarm and engage the u-joint. Loosely install the 4 bolts first, then I put wheel and axle on with axle through right angle drive and wheel just bearing weight on floor. Tightened axle up and pinch clamp on swing arm then tightened the 4 bolts. I swear the right angle drive runs cooler now I installed it this way.

The reason I did it this way is the 4 studs on the joint allow some play and inaccuracy in alignment....told you I was anal.

The manual just says bolt it up then put wheel on. If this is confusing PM me.
 
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