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I wanted to have a compressor on the bike all the time in case I got a flat, but I didn’t want it to take up room in my luggage. I already had a Slime compressor that I’d chopped up once before to reduce it in size, but I wanted to make it even smaller. So, I pulled the pump out of the old housing and built an entirely new housing. Once done, the final size of the pump is 4” wide by 5” long by 2” high. There aren’t any little nooks and crannies on a Super Tenere to stash a pump, so my original plan was to add a mount for it on top my existing tool tube. Unfortunately, there just wasn’t enough clearance there to easily access it. So, now that the pump is done, I’m in the process of building a new on-board tool box (with the same general dimensions as my old tool tube) that’ll hold all my standard tools plus the compressor. The new pump housing and the housing cover are all made from ABS sheet plastic and aluminum. The sheet plastic comes from a company called TAP Plastics, and the aluminum angle was the stuff you can get at Lowe’s or Home Depot.

To keep the compressor small, I made it so the on/off switch is actually in the power cable rather than taking up room in the compressor housing. The switch is rated for 12 volts and 20 amps. I didn’t really want an illuminated one, but that one was the smallest switch I could find with that amp rating. The power cable plugs into the compressor using a standard two pin connector. My plan is to add a pigtail, either to my PC 8 or directly to the battery, to power the compressor. The power cable will be stored under the right side cowling of the bike. I also made the air hose detachable; it screws into a brass fitting on the end of the compressor, and is removed for storage. Both the pump and the air hose will fit in the new tool box.

Since these little compressors tend to run hot, I added a 12 volt mini fan to the chassis, that draws air in from the outside and circulates it through the housing while the pump is running. If necessary the cover can be removed from the pump for additional cooling, since all the wiring is in the base. The chassis wiring for the pump, and the power cable, are all 14 gauge wire. You could go smaller than that, but 14 gauge will definitely handle the 15 amp draw of the compressor.

The materials are on the way for the new on board toolbox, so the pump will soon have a new home.



This is the way the original compressor looked.



This was my first rebuilt version. It was still too big, and took up too much room in the top case.



This is the new chassis for the compressor, after a coat of paint.



A shot of the compressor that shows the location of the ventilation fan.



The completed compressor, without the cover.



Just the compressor, sitting on a cutting mat to show the compressor dimensions.



The compressor with air hose and power cable attached.

There are more photos of the compressor under construction here: http://www.stromtrooper.com/members/41909-rcinnc-albums-building-smaller-compressor.html

The materials for the new toolbox are on the way via UPS. I'll update with new photos when that project is done.
 

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Nice work.

For the life of me I can't find a like button to click.

I carry a Co2 cartridge and plug kit from Autozone. Haven't had to use it and wonder how much volume a little cartridge will put out. That stays in the vetter side bag on my GS 850 which has tubless tires. Plugs won't help the tubes in my Vee though......
 

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Nice work.

For the life of me I can't find a like button to click.

I carry a Co2 cartridge and plug kit from Autozone. Haven't had to use it and wonder how much volume a little cartridge will put out. That stays in the vetter side bag on my GS 850 which has tubless tires. Plugs won't help the tubes in my Vee though......
I consider the repackaging of the Slime compressor a first class idea. I have done something similar but nowhere as pretty.

To prove the usefulness of the CO2 cartridges, I suggest you find a tyre that needs replacing and drill a hole in the tread while you are at home in a controlled environment.

The plugs work fine but don't waste your time on the CO2 cartridges.
I have had personal experience with CO2 cartridges and a saying in Oz "as useful as a third nostril" describes them well.
I had a puncture and after using 6 x CO2 cartridges to no avail, I managed to borrow a 12volt compressor which saved the day.
 

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I know it's very old fashioned but it works without any worry about batteries, connections, moving parts and all that, plus it's very efficient with the twin pistons, able to pump a flat tyre to 35psi in a couple of minutes with a little patience and muscle power.

It's very compact!
 

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I know it's very old fashioned but it works without any worry about batteries, connections, moving parts and all that, plus it's very efficient with the twin pistons, able to pump a flat tyre to 35psi in a couple of minutes with a little patience and muscle power.
And they are fairly reliable :)

I carry a small off the shelf pump:
MotoPressor Pocket Pump

A gauge similar to:
Motopressor Digital Tyre Gauge

And tyre plug kit:
Dynaplug® Online Store | Dynaplug® Carbon Ultralite Tubeless Tire Repair Kit

The whole lot fits in the neoprene case the pump comes with, in the back-back of the under seat storage. Except the 'gator clips - too big, I just use the SAE connector.
 

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I had one of the line to plug hole type in 1980. Never got to try it on the road but did work at home. Motorcycles have been my main means of travel since 1973 and had too many bikes then all so. My regular work bike had a slick rear tire and had not put the new one on yet so rode my new GS1100 the 97 mile round trip to work that nice warm night.Put the line pump and bag it came in in with my coffee pack and strap it behine me. Rode the big 1100 was too fast but fun.:grin2: Am after 3rd shift was really enjoying the ride home but when home had lost my rear pack! Guess when hitting the gears hard did not hear it come off.Just one strap still on bike seat. Two mornings later see the pack on a fence post.Pull over and it is empty but see the steel Thermos mashed flat as a pancake but no sign of any thing else.Bag looked like a Simi had ran over it.
 

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I consider the repackaging of the Slime compressor a first class idea. I have done something similar but nowhere as pretty.

To prove the usefulness of the CO2 cartridges, I suggest you find a tyre that needs replacing and drill a hole in the tread while you are at home in a controlled environment.

The plugs work fine but don't waste your time on the CO2 cartridges.
I have had personal experience with CO2 cartridges and a saying in Oz "as useful as a third nostril" describes them well.
I had a puncture and after using 6 x CO2 cartridges to no avail, I managed to borrow a 12volt compressor which saved the day.
Thanks a bunch for this. The 850 is about ready for new tires. Think I'll poke a hole and test out the kit at home. Of course to be an accurate simulation, I'd have to try it at night in the rain, with a dead flashlight.:wink2:
 

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I have one of the Spark plug pumps from the old days buried somewhere in my tool box. That was easy on the opposed twin BMW and a Farmall tractor.
That is a beautiful job of machining and construction, RCinNC. But it still takes up more real estate that just tossing the case and rolling it up in a shop rag.
On the advice of Burque, I'll gain some space in my kit by removing the CO2 cartridges and the adapter.:thumbup:
 

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Just too old to care any more.Bigger boxes if I need more room :grin2:.Main reason I have had a Slime so long is because I thought it was so small :wink2:: Don't get me wrong 30 years ago when still on the machine floor 3rd shift and lots of G jobs all ready done on drag and street bikes would have jump in to this asap. Now just tell you thats a real nice job and really mean it. We need a big thumbs up on the side faces.0:)
 

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on 17 wee took slime pump out of padded case then wrapped in 1 layer of innertube rubber mostly for the aft rear edge against the metal cross bar, then taped it over with gorilla tape to seal out moisture. Also fit motion pro bead breaker, plug kit, 8 rubber gloves, tow strap, jumper cables.

https://imgur.com/a/fsljm
 

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My new Slime air pump arrived today after I ordered it on Saturday night (Ebay) looks like it originated in Tracy so just up the road...
I'll put the CO2 kit back in the tail bag on my bicycle...
 

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The Slime pump I got was purchased at an ACE Hardware for 12 dollars and Slime had a 12 dollar rebate. It cost me the 8.5% tax in Calif at the time. Like almost free, you know? Neener, Neener.
 
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