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The Juniors that have failed all have had one tip-off to the electronics failure: The green LED will flicker erratically. According to Deltran, there is no other cause for that other than an internal electronic failure.
With other chargers, or ones that have had too high a rating for the amp/hr capacity of the battery, I have seen batteries melt, boil over, remove paint, and etch frames. But all those cases were with lead-acid batteries, never with an AGM battery. Either I have been extremely lucky these past 20 years or AGM batteries just do not boil over, melt, catch fire, or a Battery Tender Plus malfunction doesnt happen, or a combination of the 2.
When I do take one of my bikes out, the power strip for all 3 Tenders is switched off, so periodically all of the bikes see no charging or tending action.
The Plus charging rate at full tilt is 1.25A, the Jr. is .75A. Enough to possibly, evenutally rin a battery dry, although before my bikes used AGM and I was using lead-acid batteries, I never had a battery run low. Deltran did warn about this in the manual supplied with the Tender.
The original Tender used a translucent plastic 2-wire connector, square on the bottom, roof-shaped on top. The Tender Plus that succeeded the Tender use a SAE rubberized molded connector, with an encapsulated female terminal and an exposed male terminal.
The charging rate strategy was also changed in the Plus to me more compatible with the AGM batteries that succeeded the lead-acid batteries. The Plus works well with both lead-acid and AGM, but the original Tender had problems charging the AGM.
In any event, I check my battery capacities at least once every 2 months. When I see that capacity dropping, the battery gets replaced.
My sister-in-law who lives in Florida 4 months out of the year was hesitant to use a Battery Tender in her '05 Mustang while she was gone, claiming she heard of battery maintainer-caused fires. A call to the local department told her the reasons for the fires were people using damaged extension cords between the wall outlet and the Tender. I keep mine plugged into the wall outlet, but instead of using an extension cord, I use a Battery Tender extension cable between the Tender and the battery. As I said, 20 years and not an issue whatsoever.
The recommended initial charging rate is 1/10th the amp-hr capacity of the battery X 10 hours. Beyond the initial charging procedure, the 1/10th recommendation still applies. According to Yuasa, the YTX12-BS as used in a '04-'17 DL650 Vstrom 10 has a rating of 10 amp-hours. The Tender Jr would be ideal having a maximum charging rate of .75 amps. The '02-'16 DL1000 Vstrom uses a YTX14-BS, which has a rating of 12 amp-hours, for which the Tender Plus would be a better choice as it has a charging rate of 1.25A. All 3 of my bikes have batteries of a 12 amp-our rating and are on Pluses. My son's SV650, with the YTX-12BS sits on a Battery Tender Jr.
I dont worry about any of the 4 in my garage, but I am vigilant.
 

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Lrobby, yep.... didn't pull the battery, just put it on a tender via a pigtail attached to battery. Never had a problem with that with several bikes over several years.
For you guys that ride on those nice sunny 50+ degree days in the winter..... Well, the thing that keeps me off the road is the SALT. Even on a nice day, all that salt dust is still on the roadways. You can see it on every cage on the road. It's almost atomized. And it gets into all the little nooks and crannies on a motorcycle. Maybe I'm over paranoid about this, but just picture an electrical failure the following August, hundreds of miles from home from some connection that just corroded out due to salt. I've got no problem riding in cold weather - heated gear; but it's the salt that keeps me off the roadways until a cleansing rain or two in the spring.
If yer riding..... ride safe all.
gary
I will ride the strom down to about 45 degrees for a quick jaunt, half an hour or so in one direction, over 50 and I can ride all day. Below 45 and the Wing comes out instead. I can ride it down to 32 degrees all day. I have ridden on rare occasions when truly inspired below 32 but the roads have to be dry. As for salt, I live with it, neither of my bikes will win the "best kept" award.
 

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RebornRider;5325473 For you guys that ride on those nice sunny 50+ degree days in the winter..... Well said:
Agree completely.
There was a thread here last Winter about a guy trying to sue Suzuki b/c his new DL1000 was rusting and pitting.
He rode a few roads with some level of salt contamination, and that was all it took.
No one here gave his lawsuit a fart's chance in a tornado.
 

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Not time in east Tennessee yet. Saturday we rode the newly opened "missing link" of the Foothills Parkway. Mid fifties , sunny and dry , heated gear on low or switched off. Probably will be close to Christmas before time for it's winter nap . Set the alarm for mid March.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Slow Eddie..... do they salt the roads down there?
Ride safe all that ARE riding.
g
 

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I've only seen and heard of gravel here in Blount County. I've never seen salt or brine used on any of the parkways, either . I live on a steep road and they use gravel only . In Knoxville they use a lot of salt and brine. Both are nasty . but necessary I suppose.
 

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Winter has come early and caught me off guard, I haven't winterized my bike yet. I do the typical: treat gas, change oil if over 2K miles, pull battery and keep charged, wash bike if dirty, mist cylinders if I'm feeling energetic.

One thing that's not typical is that I store the seat inside and treat it with a vinyl conditioner. Over years the cold will dry and crack the vinyl, it also prohibits mice from nesting under the seat. I check and/or replace the air filter in the spring, and I'll evict any mice that have moved in over the winter. I found them once under the seat and never in the airbox.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Winter has come early and caught me off guard, I haven't winterized my bike yet. I do the typical: treat gas, change oil if over 2K miles, pull battery and keep charged, wash bike if dirty, mist cylinders if I'm feeling energetic.

One thing that's not typical is that I store the seat inside and treat it with a vinyl conditioner. Over years the cold will dry and crack the vinyl, it also prohibits mice from nesting under the seat. I check and/or replace the air filter in the spring, and I'll evict any mice that have moved in over the winter. I found them once under the seat and never in the airbox.
Some good ideas here! I like the idea of removing the seat to deny mice that shelter they often seek. Gonna do it! Thanks!
Is it spring yet? :)
g
 

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Some good ideas here! I like the idea of removing the seat to deny mice that shelter they often seek. Gonna do it! Thanks!
Is it spring yet? :)
g
Starting to think about the 2019 riding season. I hope those that plan weekend rides (you know who you are - Pete, Gary, NEVA etc...) are on track to begin the planning stages shortly.
It's only been four weeks since I last rode, but I am already missing it. :crying2:
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Hi Syd..... I'M ON IT!! lol
Looking at mid to late May or early June.
:)
g
 

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how big of a problem is salt really? in the past ive taken my bikes out for a ride or two when the roads are dry just to get the fluids going. never really noticed a problem. BUT, they were older bikes i didnt care too much about. This is my first winter with the Vee
 

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Discussion Starter #34
how big of a problem is salt really? in the past ive taken my bikes out for a ride or two when the roads are dry just to get the fluids going. never really noticed a problem. BUT, they were older bikes i didnt care too much about. This is my first winter with the Vee
Well........ As I see it, even on a nice day there's salt DUST all over the roadways. You can see it on all the cars, all the time. So I figure that, almost atomized, dust would be finding it's way into the far reaches of my bike's guts. And I don't want that corrosive stuff anywhere near the bike. And, for me, it's more a reliability of the system issue than cosmetic ( though a nice looking bike is nice ). So, even though there are very tempting days to ride in the winter here in southern New England, I resist.

Whenever y'all choose to ride........ Ride safe.
gary
 

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thanks for the input, i would like to hear from someone who rides these all winter if there are any long term affects, First Hand
Cars are covered with salt residue because of when the roads were wet, there is unlikely to be issues of concern from any dry salt which is out and about. What you don’t want is the wet salt spraying everywhere, it’s hard enough on our poor cars. If it’s above freezing and the roads are dry, I’m likely to be out riding, never had rust or corrosion on any bike I’ve owned.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Good input on the salt issue. Should I dare? lol There ARE many ride-able days in the southern New England winters, as long as you keep the elevation down there, too.
Ride safe all, whenever you decide to ride! :)
gary
 

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Cars are covered with salt residue because of when the roads were wet, there is unlikely to be issues of concern from any dry salt which is out and about. What you don’t want is the wet salt spraying everywhere, it’s hard enough on our poor cars. If it’s above freezing and the roads are dry, I’m likely to be out riding, never had rust or corrosion on any bike I’ve owned.
If you drive through some puddles do you always try to rinse off or just roll with it?
Its funny, been riding 20 years and im asking these questions. Something about the Vee makes me want to ride as much as possible.
 

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I went ahead and put the bike away yesterday after a 150 mile ride. Changed the oil, treated the gas, and brought the seat & battery inside. I may go ahead and just replace the battery, it's 10 years old. I'm a bit anal with numbers, I rode a few extra miles so I was able to put the bike to bed with exactly 74,000 miles.
 
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