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Put the bike to sleep two days ago. Yesterday was a wet 6-8" snow. Salt went down on the roads. So, she was put in her corner of the garage. Tire pressures updated. Oil very recently changed. Treated gas up to the brim on the tank. Dryer sheets placed in and around her ( discourages mice ). Put 'er on the battery tender and said g'night!
Till we get a good cleansing rain come springtime, she's hibernating.
Happy Thanksgiving all. :)
gary
 

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Put the bike to sleep two days ago. Yesterday was a wet 6-8" snow. Salt went down on the roads. So, she was put in her corner of the garage. Tire pressures updated. Oil very recently changed. Treated gas up to the brim on the tank. Dryer sheets placed in and around her ( discourages mice ). Put 'er on the battery tender and said g'night!
Till we get a good cleansing rain come springtime, she's hibernating.
Happy Thanksgiving all. :)
gary
Didn't pull battery? Just clamped on and plugged in the Tender?
I'm debating. Bike is against a warm wall in an otherwise cold garage attached to house.
Also I pulled the mirrors and windshield. For safer keeping.
I don't use dryer sheets. I use liquid fabric softener. Much better. So, that could be a problem.
 

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Mine was put up a few weeks ago, some snow on the ground and roads.

Here's my routine: I usually start with an oil and filter change (unless recently done), check tire pressures, add Marine Sta-Bil, top off the gas tank, take a brief ride to run the mixture through the system, swap positions with the snow blower in the garage, put on center stand, slide vinyl/rubber floor mat under front tire (old wives tale but I do it anyway), plug in Battery Tender to bike and wall outlet, set out several boxes of d-CON poison, and throw the mc cover over it. And hope spring comes early.
 

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I try never to put my bikes to sleep. Here in the Midwest you just never know when you'll have a warm(er) sunny day to ride, and if all the planets align, I wanna be out there enjoying my bike.
Tank full, tires checked every week, tethered to the Battery Tender at all times. It's ready when I am.
 

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Mine has been put up since I broke my femur 2 months ago. I put stabil and place it on a tender, other than that, it will be ridden the next sunny day, even in the middle of Winter. Lots hinges on my recovery though.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Lrobby, yep.... didn't pull the battery, just put it on a tender via a pigtail attached to battery. Never had a problem with that with several bikes over several years.
For you guys that ride on those nice sunny 50+ degree days in the winter..... Well, the thing that keeps me off the road is the SALT. Even on a nice day, all that salt dust is still on the roadways. You can see it on every cage on the road. It's almost atomized. And it gets into all the little nooks and crannies on a motorcycle. Maybe I'm over paranoid about this, but just picture an electrical failure the following August, hundreds of miles from home from some connection that just corroded out due to salt. I've got no problem riding in cold weather - heated gear; but it's the salt that keeps me off the roadways until a cleansing rain or two in the spring.
If yer riding..... ride safe all.
gary
 

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6 of one

On some of my other bikes, I leave the batteries in and just charge them periodically (after determining there's no current draw to run them down). But it is so easy to pull the Vee battery that I do it and put it on the bench, where it also gets periodically charged. Kind of moving away from tenders on those that do not drain the battery, as it is just a waste of power. In contrast, my Boxster has a huge current drain while turned off, so it lives on the tender, even during the summer months.

A few years ago they started using 'brine' on the streets prior to an expected ice storm or snowfall. It seems to be much more corrosive than salt, it dries to a very fine powder that arises in clouds when stirred up by traffic. And it is slippery when wet. So once the brine goes down, the bikes stay in.

Used to take my Airhead out in the winter on warm days. The first year they 'brined', found all sorts of rust spots in the nooks and crannies of the frame. Never had that problem with salt. Spent most of that spring cleaning them up. No more winter riding.

And I usually wait for the first big rain of the spring to wash all the residue down the drain. Fortunately that usually happens before it gets all that warm.
 

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Next thing to do is go back out to the garage and unplug the battery tender. There is no need to keep it plugged into the bike 24/7 You risk the chance of over charging the battery.
 

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Some of us...'r...a few of us Canucks try to ride all winter. OK, maybe just me! I'm in Midland which is about 2 hours North of Toronto on the shores of Georgian Bay, and we tend to get some pretty windy snow squalls off the lake, but if you pick your days and the roads are dry.....I'm out there!
Last year, my final day was December 12th and I had it back out on February 2nd. Coldest day so far was minus 12 Celsius....a wee bit nipply!
Ride safe guys, and Happy Thanksgiving to our 'Merican friends.

Larry
 

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Put the bike to sleep two days ago. Yesterday was a wet 6-8" snow. Salt went down on the roads. So, she was put in her corner of the garage. Tire pressures updated. Oil very recently changed. Treated gas up to the brim on the tank. Dryer sheets placed in and around her ( discourages mice ). Put 'er on the battery tender and said g'night!
Till we get a good cleansing rain come springtime, she's hibernating.
Happy Thanksgiving all. :)
gary
Ok, for a minute there I thought it was euthanasia.
 

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Next thing to do is go back out to the garage and unplug the battery tender. There is no need to keep it plugged into the bike 24/7 You risk the chance of over charging the battery.
I've never had that happen with a Battery Tender in 20+ years of using them. I continually use a Battery Tender Plus on each of my 3 bikes.
From talking to a tech at Deltran, Battery Tender's parent company, that was more of an issue with the old lead-acid batteries, not with the AGM batteries I use. The gal told me any time the bike is parked for more than 3 days,leave it on the Tender. Have you experienced an overcharged battery leaving it on a Tender?
 

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Sounds like you guys just need to buy a “beater” bike so you can ride throughout winter!

If you have 3 bikes, you don’t need to buy 3 battery tenders, just rotate it among the bikes once a week or so. Unless your bikes are stored in a remote storage unit or something and you won’t see them until springtime.
 

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Not at all. I could have bought a multi-bank Tender, but if it developed a problem I wouldnt have a Tender for any of them.
3 wall-mounted Tender Pluses in the garage plugged into a switched power strip, one for each with it's own 10' extension cable between the Tender and the bike. I have no need to play a weekly shell game between the 3 bikes. For the $45 I paid for each of them years ago, they've more than paid for themselves many times over in battery life.
 

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Not usually

Next thing to do is go back out to the garage and unplug the battery tender. There is no need to keep it plugged into the bike 24/7 You risk the chance of over charging the battery.
All of my tenders are voltage sensing. They monitor battery voltage, actually charge only when the voltage gets below a certain level, charge until the battery reaches a certain level, and stop charging. So I don't think they can overcharge a battery. I can almost watch it cycle on my Boxster. Switches from 'fully charged' to 2 amp charging, to trickle charging, to 'fully charged' a couple of times a day. On the bikes I have hooked to tenders, it takes days or weeks for them to drop enough to charge. So those I disconnect, and periodically (every couple of weeks) hook up to top up the batteries.

I doubt they'd drop enough, even all winter, to actually harm the batteries. So I could just wait until spring to charge everything. But since spring arrives unpredictably, I want to be ready. And I have killed a couple batteries over the years due to my unwillingness to wait until a battery is charged fully.
 

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Use battery tender or what ever other charger you like. Us it 24/7-365. But when the circuit board eventually fails. Ahh never mind electronics never fail.
 

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So far, "eventually" hasnt come to the 3 Tender Pluses I've been using all these years. But if one does fail, I'll send it back to them with $10.90, and replace it with a new one.
I did have a problem with a Battery Tender Junior, as did my brother and a friend with one. All used for riding lawn mowers. 1 was replaced free under their 5-year warranty, the other 2 cost $10.90 each for replacement with new units.
Lots of things I've fretted about concerning motorcycling. Battery death due to a malfunctioning Battery Tender hasnt been one of them.
 

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I use 2 battery tenders rotated between 3 bikes. The tenders are from O'Reilly's and are designed to be wired into a marine battery and plugged in continually when the boat is at dock. Have changed the hard wire to a Powerlet style plug in on the side of the bike. Have been using this system for 10 plus years and absolutely no issues. Do this in the summer also between the bikes. They are kept in an unheated Montana garage. Works wonderful for me as my BMW is still on its original 2010 battery, and the other two bikes batteries are at least 5 years old. Unknown age on my Strom since it came with the bike when I bought in in the spring of 2015. That one may be replaced next year. Your results may vary....
 

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So far, "eventually" hasnt come to the 3 Tender Pluses I've been using all these years. But if one does fail, I'll send it back to them with $10.90, and replace it with a new one.
I did have a problem with a Battery Tender Junior, as did my brother and a friend with one. All used for riding lawn mowers. 1 was replaced free under their 5-year warranty, the other 2 cost $10.90 each for replacement with new units.
Lots of things I've fretted about concerning motorcycling. Battery death due to a malfunctioning Battery Tender hasnt been one of them.
Battery death verses battery related fire. My concern is the latter.
 

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Next thing to do is go back out to the garage and unplug the battery tender. There is no need to keep it plugged into the bike 24/7 You risk the chance of over charging the battery.
YA I guess if you need something to worry about. Been using them for years. Even the cheap ones from harbor freight, no problems. Guess everyone has something to piss and moan about .
hard to say when you are sharing your keyboard with you cat. :surprise:
 
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