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I realised I was losing pressure in my back tyre and found a nail in the tyre. I took it to local motorbike garage to get it repaired and mechanic said he would use a "mushroom"patch from inside. He also said that there was a limit of 60 or 80 kph after the repair. I was pretty surprised by this as I had read that a proper vulcanised repair from inside the tyre should not have any restrictions. Are they just being really cautious or do I have to go this slowly? The tyre has done less than 3000k so it has quite a lot of life left in it. The tyre is an OEM battle wing.
 

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I've used plugs without any problems through the life of a tire on my Honda ST1300 (Pan.) as well as radial tired car tires. Never had any problems.
 

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A mushroom patch is, I believe, simply a form of plug and is not vulcanized. A vulcanized patch should hold for the life of a tire. Now, whether or not you want to ride on a patched tire is another matter . . .
 

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How much is your life worth less than a new tire? Never ride on a plug tire except to limp home or to a dealer to buy new one.
Very dangerous, sure you may get away with it till the plug fails then what. The price of a new tire will last about 5 seconds in the ER room. Just sayin, Jim in Ojai ca
 

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How much is your life worth less than a new tire? Never ride on a plug tire except to limp home or to a dealer to buy new one.
Very dangerous, sure you may get away with it till the plug fails then what. The price of a new tire will last about 5 seconds in the ER room. Just sayin, Jim in Ojai ca
I know of tons of people, including myself, who have done a lot of mileage on tires with plugs, plug patches, and patches in them, and I can't recall any stories of catastrophic failure. About the worst that has happened to anyone is a rapid loss of air pressure when a plug let go. And even that is unlikely if the repair is done correctly.

Sure, in theory the damage to the carcass caused by whatever made the hold, or the subsequent reaming out of the hole for a plug, could result in catastrophic tire failure. And yet I can't think of a single person on the many forums I have frequented over the past 20 years who has had this happen with a repaired tire.
 

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How much is your life worth less than a new tire? Never ride on a plug tire except to limp home or to a dealer to buy new one.
Very dangerous, sure you may get away with it till the plug fails then what. The price of a new tire will last about 5 seconds in the ER room. Just sayin, Jim in Ojai ca
Do you always panic when you get flats

what is difference between a plug failing and running over a spike ?



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If the puncture is near the center of the tire, I always just plug it and ride. If I somehow pickup a puncture in the sidewall, then it's time for a new tire. I check the pressure in both tires before every ride. If I replaced a tire everytime I got a puncture, I'd be broke and couldn't afford to pay the deductible for that hospital visit.

Just picked up a 2" screw in my back tire the other day. Almost dead center of the tread. Plug, air up, and ride.

Lot of home construction in my area and a lot of careless construction workers with screws/nails/fasteners rolling out of the beds of their work trucks.
 

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Just adding to the chorus of what has already been said here. I too had a self-taper screw give my rear tyre a puncture about 50mm off centre in the tread. I remmed it and repaired it myself done almost 9,000kms on it since and although I do think about it when I ride sometimes because it’s the rear tyre and hasn’t shown any sign of going flat I’m happy. I ride at like most 10% + of the speed limit, so true speed, I have taken the fix to 135k/p/h for shorter periods. It really depends on your comfit zone. If it was my front tyre or a side wall, I’d follow Jim’s advice. I’ll also retire this tyre a little earlier as it’s now approaching 17,000k’s on the clock, so i’ve almost doubled it’s life. (touch wood).

Cheers
Sparky
 

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Mushroom plugs are very safe. They usually are installed with contact tire cement. If installed properly, I can't see one failing at anything under extremely high speeds like way over 100mph. I'd say they are better than the rope type plugs and I've never had one of those fail on a car or motorcycle.
 

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I have used fixed about 6 flats on my Stroms, one on a fellow rider's bigger sport touring bike, and had one fixed on my Porsche Boxster way back when. I carry an air compressor and repair kit under my seat. I always used the "String" type of plug and had great success. In a couple of cases the plugs were on pretty new tires and lasted the life of the tire (that was true on my Boxster as well.)

I have never used the mushroom plug type of repair but vaguely recall a thread saying that the mushroom type isn't best for on the road repairs unless you take the tire off. (My recollection could be flawed though!)

..Tom
 

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How much is your life worth less than a new tire? Never ride on a plug tire except to limp home or to a dealer to buy new one.
Very dangerous, sure you may get away with it till the plug fails then what. The price of a new tire will last about 5 seconds in the ER room. Just sayin, Jim in Ojai ca
I once patched a Goldwing rear tire with a "sticky string" type of plug and then ran that tire until its natural death 10K miles later. If you are genuinely concerned about a visit to the ER you should consider the statistics against you when you ride. You can bring your motorcycling risk all the way down to zero just by selling the bike.
 

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I found on a mushroom plug that it did fine as long as long as I stayed off of gravel. After two failures on gravel I picked up a new Continental TKC 70 on the rear.
 

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Good luck guys! Jim in Ojai
Thanks Jim!
Didn't mean to come on too strong. You are right, there is a risk, albeit a small one, of catastrophic tire failure with a repaired tire. Before someone decides to run with a repaired tire, they should at least be aware of that risk. It's one I'm willing to live with, but others may choose differently.
 

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I found on a mushroom plug that it did fine as long as long as I stayed off of gravel. After two failures on gravel I picked up a new Continental TKC 70 on the rear.
Just to be clear, when you say "mushroom plug", do you mean one of those plug patches installed from inside of the tire, or one of those "Stop'n'Go" tire plugs. I haven't heard good things about those other than as a temporary fix.
 

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Just to be clear, when you say "mushroom plug", do you mean one of those plug patches installed from inside of the tire, or one of those "Stop'n'Go" tire plugs. I haven't heard good things about those other than as a temporary fix.
By my reckoning the mushroom plug is similar to the stop and go but requires adhesive and has a larger head. I use the rope type since the stop N go and the mushroom type require an installation gun to be cried.
 

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I'm just going through this - many buy the kits and don't use them so figure I'd give some feedback.

Opinions vary - one rider races and uses plugs all the time.

I tried the Stop and Go which is a mushroom plug and while it would get a bike to a repair place there is still a slow leak - a bit less than what it was.... very slow but not trust worthy and there have been some negative reports on that style tho many ride it to the wear bars.
I have not been successful with the slow leak in the centre of the Pilot 3 so far with this kit.
I think it would easily have got me to a service centre the first time around. Sure learned how tough motorcycle tires are getting that plug in.

The string type seem a bit more reliable as it self vulcanizes. This was a good exercise as know what to do on the road at least to get to a service area.
Think I will get a Safetyseal kit from surveying the reviews of riders who have used both

ordered this one


Amazon.com: Safety Seal 30 String Pro Tire Repair Kit: Automotive

Tire Plug Kits, Fix Flat Tire, Tire Repair Tools | Safety Seal

Nother reason to have a water bottle along...find the leak. :D

I dont wrench and if I'm going to take it to the dealer I just put a new rear on.
The Strom will only be local riding for the rest of the year so will be a decent test for the SafetySeal product.

I think I might give the Stop and Go one more try to see if I can get it to work.
Seems when you stretch the plug back out to get the mushroom cap to be flat that's where it is hard to tell the correct amount of pull.



Pocket Tire Plugger - For All Tubeless Tires - Stop & Go International Inc Store

I'm not particularly worried on a slow leak failure - I'll keep the TPMS on all the time instead of just check.

This may be a good overview of both....might be the Stopngo method has made the string method impossible now but I'd rather have the string kit with me and I'll just use the Stopngo compressor.

Like what others have said, I have not had a string plug even leak on me for 1000's of miles.
Hmmm this looks good too - small and compact and can take multiple strings tho Safety Seal seems well proven.

Dynaplug® Tubeless Tire Puncture Repair Tools and Accessories
 

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I found the stop n' go mushrooms temporary and short term (I have had them come out after 20 miles). Any gravel seems to push them in. I still use their mini compressor but have the slime worms on board too instead of the mushrooms for fixes on the road.
 

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The one that does last is the old fashion sticky string or gummy worm or whatever your favorite slang is...

I use the heavy duty brown or red type, they are tougher than the black rubber type. I had two of them in my FJR1300's rear on a long tour, they held till the tire was bald and I was riding mostly hard on curvy roads, the edges were smooth at over 8,000 miles. That was the first time I took a plugged tire till it was a slick. Plugs held fine, no air loss, held 40 psi fine. I've used these camel or victor brown plugs many times in the heavy duty truck tires I run on a diesel dually.

Proper installation is key, use fresh rubber cement, clean the hole, let it set up and trim it before riding. Only takes a few minutes for the glue to dry and it will last.

http://www.amazon.com/Victor-22-5-00112-8-Brown-Tire-Repair/dp/B000CEG472/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top?ie=UTF8
 
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