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going on a small 1k ride and thought I'd better get myself a puncture kit. which one do you use,what brand is it and is it easy too use ?? did a search in the spares and tools section with no results.

thanks oz n nz stromers
 

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$tromtrooper
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Many sing the praises of the Nealy kits: Nealey Tire Repair Kit

Make sure you get a 12v pump and test it before you hit the road.
 

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Go into your local Autobarn or Repco and get a Slime tubeless repair kit with a small slime pump. If you don't have a power outlet on the bike make sure that the pump has alligator clips for the battery terminals.
The whole thing should be able to fit into the space under the seat behind where the tool kit goes.
 

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on-road tire repair

I've used the "rope" and it worked

I've used plug (msuhroom) and it worked

be warned that if you rasp out a nail or screw hole larger to use a rope (or two) or plug - the resulting hole size may preclude a proper internal patch repair becasue internal patches have a stem to go in the hole - and stem size must match hole size - thas what I found out the hard way in California
 

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+1 on slime kits - use the kit first time ever on my maiden trip down south with vstrom - yep check everything before u go - keep the instructions with you if u havent used it before - but it's relatively simple
 

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Before you change your next tire, get a hammer and a nail, put a few holes in and practice patching them on the bike in the comfort of your garage.

It's easy, but learning is a lot less painful if it isn't raining on you and you don't have mud up to your ankles.

The big trick is to buy solid tools, the rasp and string inserter have to be strong and need to have a T-handle. If you have a grip like superman you might be able to use one of the "screwdriver" handle tools in the dry, but no chance in the rain.

"
Many sing the praises of the Nealy kits: Nealey Tire Repair Kit
"
They've never used one in the rain then :). Like the size of the kit but getting those strings into a steel radial needs a lot of effort.

Pete
 

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Wez, your Strom tyres are tubless so the "Stop & Go Pocket Tire plugger kit" (mushroom plugs) will get you home, see pic.. do a youtube search on them if you havnt used them before, there are some good instructional vids.
This kit is small and easy, AND A QUICK REPAIR !!!!
I also seperately bought a gas canister attachement that fits the larger canisters to re-infalte the tyre after repair, you need about 4-5 smaller compact canisters to get back to 40psi but only 3 larger ones. (most "kits" only supply 3 compact canisters) I also have a small footpump under the seat too.
It is not recommended to ride long distances on plugs but I will admit I have done it on and offroad without problems.
If you are just bitumen touring this kit will get you to the next town or home.

they are available at https://www.adventuremoto.com.au/product_info.php?products_id=1136
The larger gas canisters are at MCA in auburn Sydney or
http://www.mcas.com.au/_products.php?subcategory=33&line=2

Tip - When you use the gas canisters dont hold them without riding gloves on !!! they get very cold when they fill the tyre.

Have a good trip
 

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I carry a Genuine Innovations kit and have used it once. I'd never used it before but it was a piece of cake and I managed to make it the 500km home on a pretty stuffed rear tyre. Piccy below was what the tyre (& repair) looked like when I got home.





I also carry a small compressor now and have used it a few times on the road. You will struggle to get enough pressure in your tyre with the CO2 canisters alone.
 

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Before you change your next tire, get a hammer and a nail, put a few holes in and practice patching them on the bike in the comfort of your garage.

It's easy, but ...

Pete
Good advice. A friend came over with a leak and we plugged it with a mushroom plug (not considered permanent in a radial). I don't think we would have been successful on the road. IIRC the final install involved channel locks from the toolbox and some work at the bench vise.

Also, I run U.S.-brand Ultraseal. Perfect tire balance without weights and no leaks thus far ~10k miles. But, a real mess when changing tires.

I have plugged with strings, and rubber cement is your friend with respect to lubrication. The tee-handle suggestion seems sound.
 

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I suffered a puncture on my latest outing and managed to plug with the rope type to get me home. The rope type plugs should be considered only temporary and a more permanent fix should be done ASAP.
I put a kit together so I can repair correctly on longer trips.
Go see your local tyre service with a small glass jar that has a metal lid (Small jam jars are best) and ask nicely to purchase some plugs and patches for your motorcycle repair kit. The patches are used for pin sized punctures or there abouts where as the mushroom type are for your larger repairs. The vulcanising fluid is applied and allowed to dry/react before the patch plug is applied with more fluid. Hope this helps. Steve
 

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ohh, it takes 3 CO2 cannisters to get the rear tyre to 25psi.
Rather than go the CO2 cannisters, I got one of these:

Air Transfer Hose by Motorrad Works - Motorrad Garage - No 1 Supplier of Aftermarket Motorcycle

You just do an air transfer to seat the bead, you will also need a compressor to reinflate both tyres.

Not sure how effective it will be, haven't had to use it in the 6 weeks I've owned the V, but I'm damn sure it will be easier than doing a tyre repair on a tubed KLR.

Cheers Andy
 

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Piece of cake.
Practice makes the master.

A day later, on the KLR



and again

Good pics.

You're right about practice, I reckon the last flat on the rear of my KLR, I had the tyre off, a new tube in, the tyre back on and on the road in 40 minutes (helps when they're warm).

I like the centre stand on your KLR:thumbup:, but I still reckon tubeless is a lot less work and you have a lot less chance (SFA) of pinching a tube:headbang:

I often regret not getting pics when things like this happen to me, I just get focussed on the repair and probably should sit back and take it a bit easier.

Cheers Andy
 

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Go into your local Autobarn or Repco and get a Slime tubeless repair kit with a small slime pump. If you don't have a power outlet on the bike make sure that the pump has alligator clips for the battery terminals.
The whole thing should be able to fit into the space under the seat behind where the tool kit goes.
Yes.
Got mine at Repco.
Two different kits available, one is basically just the Slime pump, the other is the pump in a case with gauge etc. included [that's the one I got].
It will fit under the seat, but I usually carry mine in the top box or tank bag as I only take it when on a trip [probably should have it under the seat but I also have NRMA Roadside Premium assist].

Apart from the Slime pump I also carry a double action mountain bike hand pump as well as my actual puncture repair kit having compressed air cylinders in it.



Wez, your Strom tyres are tubless so the "Stop & Go Pocket Tire plugger kit" (mushroom plugs) will get you home, see pic.. do a youtube search on them if you havnt used them before, there are some good instructional vids.
This kit is small and easy, AND A QUICK REPAIR !!!!
I also seperately bought a gas canister attachement that fits the larger canisters to re-infalte the tyre after repair, you need about 4-5 smaller compact canisters to get back to 40psi but only 3 larger ones. (most "kits" only supply 3 compact canisters) I also have a small footpump under the seat too.
It is not recommended to ride long distances on plugs but I will admit I have done it on and offroad without problems.
If you are just bitumen touring this kit will get you to the next town or home.

they are available at https://www.adventuremoto.com.au/product_info.php?products_id=1136
The larger gas canisters are at MCA in auburn Sydney or
http://www.mcas.com.au/_products.php?subcategory=33&line=2

Tip - When you use the gas canisters dont hold them without riding gloves on !!! they get very cold when they fill the tyre.

Have a good trip
Yes ML, wasn't it a good thing that I had my puncture kit under the seat with extra canisters in it when we were on the way back from Canberra? :thumbup:

We both learned that day that three little bottles that come with the kits is not enough. :fineprint:

And I would rather repair a puncture on the Strom tubeless wheels in preference to having to do a tube repair on my KLR any day.

A tubeless tyre, once plugged, will normally run the life of the tyre tread without issue [assuming it was plugged properly].
 

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They have to be kidding.
Starting off with one flat tyre then ending up with two?
They are suggesting it as a method to re-seat a TUBELESS tyre on the rim with a burst of air to push the casing out on to the rim, not to inflate a tyre to a ride-able pressure.

The same theory was floated years ago for fourwheel drivers, but the idea was you would inflate the spare tyre on your vehicle well above [double] the pressure it would have if driving on it.
Then if you got a soft or flat tyre you could re-inflate the tyre by using the over inflated spare, even when both tyres were equalised they both would have enough air in to drive on and get you out of trouble.

Personally I'd still rather carry the 12v pump with the mountain bike pump as back up and a spare tube to fit each wheel.
That way if you can't get the tubeless tyre to reseat you can put the tube in it and away you go.

So I'm with you on this, why end up with two almost flat tyres and have to pump them both back up again, better to go with my other option.
 

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They have to be kidding.
Starting off with one flat tyre then ending up with two?
:green_lol:
I'm with you on this one.
I'll go a bit further and say it won't even work.
Seating a bead with ~40 psi through the tiny passage of a valve stem :confused:

You guys need to laugh that place out of business.
 

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They are suggesting it as a method to re-seat a TUBELESS tyre on the rim with a burst of air to push the casing out on to the rim, not to inflate a tyre to a ride-able pressure.
So when was the last time you saw a tubeless tyre with a repairable puncture that had popped off the rim? I'll guess never.
Tubeless tyres only deflate relatively slowly compared to tubed tyres and for a rider on a street oriented bike to ride it so long that it was so flat that it popped off the rim he or she would not only have to be so insensitive to their bikes handling that they couldn't tell the tyre was deflating but they would also have to be the worlds best rider to be able to ride the bike in that condition.
As to the 4WDs why would you bother? It's hardly like you can't carry a decent pump when you head off road.
This device should be on the same shelf as snake oil and little cooper screen filters that improve your mpg.
 
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