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Sorry for the newb question, but as I was riding today I started to wonder if my shift technique was proper form or not.

With the slightest pressure up on the gear lever to take up slack, I tend to disengage the clutch at almost the same instant as I shift the gear. It all seems smooth and efficient to me, but, I'm wondering if I need to leave a larger gap in the timing of these two synchronized movements to avoid wear and tear on the box?

:confused:

Thanks for your help.
 

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Hard to destroy power train components unless you want to... Basically your gear shift is milliseconds after you pull the clutch in... You don't want to shift like a bike rig where it seems like forever between gear shifts... To me it sounds like you're doing it right... No grinding, serious clunking or crunching, then all is good...
 

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No grinding, serious clunking or crunching, then all is good...
But, but how do you tell if you've shifted if ya' can't hear the gears?

You mean that grinding noise -isn't- supposed to be there?

Wowzers!




And now back to our regularly scheduled bong...
 

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What you are doing is called pre loading and when combined with higher RPM shifting you will find that very little clutch lever depresson is needed to shift. However as a newer rider you want to be carefull as a bump in the road could cause a premature gear change without the use of the clutch. Nothing detrimental, but it may startle you especially on a down shift.
Per load shifting is really not necessary on the DL's as they are not race bikes, just something just to play around with. Sounds like your timing is fine since everything is smooth
 

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With the slightest pressure up on the gear lever to take up slack, I tend to disengage the clutch at almost the same instant as I shift the gear. It all seems smooth and efficient to me, but, I'm wondering if I need to leave a larger gap in the timing of these two synchronized movements to avoid wear and tear on the box?
Sounds good to me. I'm assuming you are pulling the clutch lever about half inch or so? Add two fingers pull with shorty levers, can't really get much smoother than that on with the clutch.
 

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But, but how do you tell if you've shifted if ya' can't hear the gears?

You mean that grinding noise -isn't- supposed to be there?

Wowzers!

And now back to our regularly scheduled bong...
Way too much bong, again.
:beatnik:
 

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You have a wet clutch, chain drive and a cushion rear hub, it is very hard to get it wrong or know that you have got it wrong.

Ride a old BMW with a heavy flywheel, dry clutch and shaft drive, you will soon know if your technique is good or bad.:thumbup:
 

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Your tec. is right. with a little more exp. you will be able to shift without
the clutch, do all practing at lower RPM. I would guess 3500rpm or less.
they shift better going up through gears than down. apply slight
pressure up blip throttle down while lifting shifter. I am 75yrs. & 24
bikes later & have never broken transmision, . They are tough, all bikes
were English or Japanese except 1947 Indian Chief. Present bike 06 Vee
56000mi..
 

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It all seems smooth and efficient
It's working. Combine what you do with a slight roll off of the throttle at the same time.

Shifting without using the clutch works for some people, and other people keep their mechanic employed. Using the clutch as originally described is smart, and really smart when downshifting.
 

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Sounds good to me. I'm assuming you are pulling the clutch lever about half inch or so? Add two fingers pull with shorty levers, can't really get much smoother than that on with the clutch.
My reach to the clutch lever was too short so I installed an adjustable lever to get it closer. Still, no need to get too quick with your shifts unless during an evasive maneuver. You can get plenty quick enough for a sporty ride without compromising your gearbox with undue pressure from a less than adequately disengaged clutch. Practicing to do it really well takes just as long as doing a sloppy job. Eventually you will need to adjust the release mechanism under the front sprocket cover.
 

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Funny thing about the Wee's(mine) transmission is that when I initially start out down the road and go thru my first shifts, the tranny is tight and quiet. Once the oil warms up to normal, the tranny becomes rather notchy as I can feel thru my left foot, the gear teeth actually meshing together as I shift. I've even experimented with how I shift to see if I could change the sensation. No matter what I did, as the engine warmed, the tranny became more notchy.
 

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The gears are always in mesh. What you feel is the projections (dogs) in one gear engaging the slots in the adjacent gear. For example #28 has dogs facing away that engage slots in #23, causing the otherwise free spinning #23 with a round center hole to be anchored to the #19 shaft by the splines in the center of #28.


 

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From 2nd on up, I don't use the clutch at all. Once you get the hang of it (ease off the throttle, blip into the next gear) it's actually smoother than using the clutch.

At least, that's been my experience.
 
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