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Discussion Starter #1
Good Morning,

I have some questions. I wanted to know what is a good price if I have the dealer do the 14,500 mile service? Is this a service I can do or should I have the dealer do it?

Oil change? Do you recommend synthetic? and if so do you recommend the OEM?

I'm not due for awhile but I want to get all my ducks in a row.

Thanks,

Don
 

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I don't think you can ask about oil here. That is why there is the big oil thread with 2300 posts. Even after you have read them you can only ask there. I am planning on doing all my 14500 mile maintenance with the exception of the valve clearance check. Even that I think the check is easier than the adjust. The rest of the items seem rather tedious but not difficult. I really do wonder if the shop is really going to lube/grease all locations listed and snug all those fasteners? I do go over fasteners regularly and find a few loose or missing.

One question I have for all. I have not snugged my exhaust fasteners. How critical? Do people do it?

Keith
 

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So having manuals are key then correct? I'm wondering what they would cost to just have them to the valve and valve adjust and I do everything else?

thanks
 

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Lots of great info here on how to perform the valve check and adjustment, but yes I highly recommend the factory service manual. NO there are no digital downloads allowed here or links to pirated manuals, but what you do by PM with other members is up to you. I am at 17K on my 650 and haven't had the valves checked yet, honestly I'm not the least bit concerned and will do it around 20K.
 
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Recently did my 14,500, it's really easy just time consuming. Getting the radiator out and then back in was the only trouble I had and it wasn't that difficult.
 
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You would want the service manuals. I don't think you will find a good copy online legal or otherwise. I am thinking one or two service items and it would pay for itself. Otherwise you are just guessing on getting at things, torques, reassembly. I would not buy it if you do not have the tools or serious intent to do the work. Even just simple things like getting wheels off for tire changes saves money vs. paying dealer. My dealer wants 75 bucks each to swap a tire on bike vs. 25 to mount tire off bike. I should learn to mount but just haven't taken the plunge yet. Fork oil, coolant, brake fluids are all going to add up if you pay for service and the bike is gone while being done. I also like the peace of mind knowing everything is buttoned up and done right (any doubt and you need to sort it before riding) and if I have to deal with some issue (cables, flat, battery) I have some familiarity with the items. Now if you are not mechanically inclined or equipped maybe it is not for you. For me half the fun is tinkering around with this machine.

I want my dealer to make a fair profit and be able to keep qualified mechanics on staff and trained but I would not pay dealer to lower pegs, replace windscreen, add tool tube, install risers, install fork brace, replace horn, replace pegs, install top case, replace locks, install tank ring..........

Make sure that rear caliper is properly slotted in the swingarm btw when mounting rear wheel.

kfh000
 

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Haynes makes an excellent manual for the DL650, if you find the FSM unavailable or too costly for the content. FWIW, my valves were within spec ~14k, but all four exhaust valves needed adjustment at ~26k. The rest is routine maintenance that a rider should be expected to handle, I would think.
 

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Do it yourself, anyone can check valve clearances, if you need to pull the cams and adjust them you probably still can do it yourself - follow the manual, it's like assembling ikea furniture.

It's a long job but it's an expensive one at a mechanics so I suppose it depends how much you value your time over your money/ how much you like getting oily. Mostly you'll tend to find they only need checking at 14.5k on bucket over shim types.
 

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Service manuals pay for themselves... everything from proper torque of all fasteners to part listings and schematics for disassembly/assembly... it's almost tough to not get it right if you paint by the numbers... The only reason for not doing most of your own maintenance is if you don't have the time, and perhaps not wanting to buy a couple of decent tools (but, your first major maintenance would have paid for those... more than once...or twice...).

As for oil, here's some light 'bathroom' reading: http://www.stromtrooper.com/235916-post1.html
 
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You may be able to get the Haynes manual at the library.

Or use Youtube for mechanical advice.

Or use this site for how to's.

If you are a total nOOb I'd start small and take your time. When it gets too tough bring it to someone else.

Anyone have a get together that can help with repairs locally? Tech day etc..
 

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I can not recommend the factory manual enough. I have just completed most of the 14,500 mile service myself. The anti-freeze flush took about an hour and cost me $17. Checking all the screws and tightening about 15 minutes. I changed the brake pads even though they didn't need it and did a brake fluid flush which took about an hour, cost $80. I replaced the air filter and that took about 10 minutes and cost $40 for OEM. I will change the oil and filter in the next 1,000 miles and have the valves scheduled to be checked by a shop but I will remove the front fairing so all they need to do is pull the radiator, should take them about 2 hours max. So my total time is about 2.5 hours and a cost of about $140. I asked my Suzuki dealer what this service would cost and he said at least $400 depending on the time it takes them, they charge $80 per hour.
I like to wrench and know how my bike works in case I break down. This also allows me to get my tools set up so I know what I need to carry on my bike when I go on trips.
 

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Start off doing small jobs yourself then expand that as your confidence, knowledge and equipment increases. Keep a record of what you've serviced, it's amazingly easy to forget exactly when something was done.

I have a fairly simple system of oil change every 5k, oil filter/air filter/plugs every 15k, valve check/coolant change every 30k, good wash/clean polish every 2k and at the same time grease/check brake pads/misc other minor adjustments. That's all probably a bit overkill but the small amount of money I loose on consumables is recouped several fold by not paying $90/hr for a shop service and the bike is always in tiptop condition. Tutoro chain oiler fitted as well by the way, filled as required.
 

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Don, I also highly recommend getting the service manual. This will not just contain the steps to perform a task, but it will also list the tasks that need to be done.

Not all services are equal. As an example, oil is replaced every 6000km (every service), but the oil filter is only replaced every 18000km (every 3rd service), according to the manual. In addition to this, there are also time-limited items: Coolant & hoses every four years, brake fluids every two years. And of course there's the wear items that may or may not need replacement: tires, chain, sprockets, brake pads, brake disks, ...

So you really can't tell what's going to happen at a particular service unless you know exactly what the next upcoming service should be according to Suzuki, and then match this to your bikes history and current state of wear. The dealer has to factor in these unknowns as well, especially if the bike hasn't been serviced by them previously. That makes predicting costs difficult.

Armed with this information you can decide which tasks you can do yourself, and what's going to be left to the dealer. For tasks you can do yourself, you do need to plan ahead a bit: Order the right quantity of fluids of course, but also things like filters, crush washers, brake pads&disks and whatnot. And the right tools of course. It's not fun having a bike sitting in the middle of the garage for a week or more, partly disassembled, waiting for a part that you forgot to order.

Like others said, start small. An oil change is probably one of the easiest tasks you can tackle with minimal experience and tools. Going over the whole bike to lubricate moving parts, and to check tightness of bolts is also childs' play.

Lifting the tank for an air filter clean/swap is also not that hard, but it does require that you take off the plastic bits. And while you have the plastic bits and the air filter off, dropping the radiator so you can inspect the spark plugs isn't that much more complicated. (Tip: Use the spark plug socket from the bikes toolkit for the front cylinder. It's the only socket I know of that can work around the awkward corner there.)

Slightly more involved would be the replacement of hydraulic and coolant fluid. This needs to be done just right, especially the hydraulic fluid, otherwise you won't be able to use the brakes to the full extent.

Checking wear items (tire thread depth, thickness of brake pads and disk, wear of chain and sprockets) isn't that hard, but actually replacing them is something that you may want to leave to the dealer until you get a bit more experienced. And the same would probably apply for things like checking your valve clearances, and replacing fuel, hydraulic and water hoses.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
As much as I would like to do the brakes, I haven't changed brakes since I was in high school. That was many, many, moons ago. LOL
 

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Each individual step is not hard at all. But without the right tools and the knowledge that comes from digging around the bike might bmean that it would take you a couple of weekends to complete the work.

I just got my DL back from having the Stator recall done and I noticed their shop rate is $62.50 a half hour. Thats a lot of money.
So I try and do everything I can myself.

I do know a local to me Indy wrench who will do an valve inspection for $200 plus shims if he can't swap.
For me that's worth it since I don't have the shims on hand and it would mean a couple of trips to the shop to either swap em or buy new ones.

I started out small oil changes and brake pad replacement then carb cleaning. And that was in the days before the web had answered to your challenges right at hand.

If I had more time I would do my valve adjust myself. Otherwise short of things like recalls I do the work.

A service manual and oil filters are the first thing I buy for a new to me bike.
 

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As much as I would like to do the brakes, I haven't changed brakes since I was in high school. That was many, many, moons ago. LOL
So easy to do on motorcycles it's ridiculous, some great write ups and vids out there too.
 

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Youtube is your friend for just about every kind of motorcycle maintenance you're apt to do. It ain't all cat videos. Changing brake pads, bleeding brakes, flushing brakes, changing radiator fluid, etc, just type it into the search block and in all likelihood, someone out there has done it and made a video. I'd never taken apart a fork, or disassembled a steering head in my life, but between Youtube and on line forums, it went very smooth.

All that being said, one thing I don't do are the valves. I just don't want to mess with it. It cost me just under $400 to have a shop do it on my Super Tenere, and to me it was worth every penny. I've owned the S10 for four years and just shy of 50,000 miles, and that valve check is the only thing I've ever paid someone to do. Since I do everything else, including changing tires, I can't squawk too much about the $400. It'll be due again when I get back from Utah, and once again, I'll pay someone to do it.
 

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Recently did my 14,500, it's really easy just time consuming. Getting the radiator out and then back in was the only trouble I had and it wasn't that difficult.
Were your valves in spec?
 

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If you are a nOOb, i'd at least check the clearances. Changing the shims is the real test and takes a bit of thorough understanding.
 

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Keep in mind the factory shop manual, while the best source for specs, (torque, engine internals, etc.), is geared towards professionals. The Haynes is more amateur friendly as far as step by step directions.
 
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