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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Strom is at 14,500 miles and up for first valve check/adjust. I've got a service manual, feeler gauges, shim kit, assembly lube, links to Jim L (V-Strom Garage) great instruct videos. Found my inch-pounds torque wrench. Anything additional needed for the job? Interested to see if any/what shims need replacing.

Changing the oil/filter, either cleaning/oiling the K&N air filter or going back to the OEM filter.
 

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Good list, Here's what I used:

Service manual
Shim kit
Metric feeler gauge
Molybdenum grease for shims
Rubber head gaskets
1211 Three Bond Silicone
Coolant, Asian blue
Air Cleaner
Air cleaner foam, lawn mower
ACF50 spray For electrical connectors
Tie wraps and bicycle Inner tube for electrical connections above radiator
4 iridium spark plugs
Folding table
Excel spreadsheet
 

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Most important tool in your tool kit: patience. Don't rush it, follow the manual, don't skip any steps, don't try to use shortcuts until you have a bit more experience.

A common mistake is that people do the front by the manual, and then think they know it all. So they mess up the rear: The rear valves need to be checked with the flywheel at the R|T mark, but need to be adjusted with the flywheel at the F|T mark. While both tasks at the front are done at the F|T mark.
 

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Painters tape, ziploc bags, sharpie for labeling parts, hoses, wires as you disassemble.

Digital camera to photograph things as they are before you disassemble (in case life interrupts and it's several months before you can finish the job, been there).

Photocopy the pertinent pages of the shop manual so you don't make the original useless w greasy fingerprints rendering critical data unreadable

Old Alaskan shipwright taught me the most important part of shop time is to first set up a "Moaning Chair". A place to sit and moan as you puzzle out a problem. I've taught that to my kids and grandkids, it has served me well.

headlamp so you can see in the dim recesses.

Have fun!
 

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You don't need a mic, it helps but it's not essential. I just used a pair of digital calipers I had and that was enough. What you do need to do is recheck the shim clearances after replacing them.

You have to remove the radiator on the 1000, have a clean bucket so that when you have to drain it for the second time because you messed up you can save and reuse the new fluid you just put in.

Put your own marks on the cam chain and sprocket.

Be REALLY careful reinstalling the cam bridges, they do need real care as they'll lift at the corners if you aren't.

There's a faint corner mark cast into the ends of the cam bridges (at least on my 1000). When reinstalling the cam lobes point into those corners when they are lined up correctly (not a tooth out either way). (I didn't follow my own comment #2 when I did it, that's advise from hindsight).

The shim kits come with 3 shims of each size, Suzuki QC is better than that so you probably will have to juggle shims. i.e. while the stamps won't be inaccurate, there was enough variation between shims of nominally the same size to juggle them to get everything roughly the same..
 

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Put your own marks on the cam chain and sprocket.
Just to reiterate: There is a significant difference between the DL650 and the DL1000 in this respect.

The DL650 has a cam chain that runs over the cam sprockets. This means the cam chain has to be loosened, and the chain and sprockets carefully marked, before you can remove the cams to get to the shim buckets. If you let go of the chain during the process it can also drop off the crankshaft sprocket. And the rear cam chain tensioner is a bitch to access. That makes the adjustment process on a DL650 very tricky.

The DL1000 has an additional center sprocket, halfway up the cylinders, that is driven by a chain from the crankshaft. The camshafts have sprockets that mesh with this center sprocket. This makes adjusting valves on a DL1000 a lot easier. No need to undo the chain tensioner, no risk of dropping the chain, no need to mark the chain or the sprockets. Just make sure the rotor is at the F|T mark (both for the front and rear) and plop the cams in with the marks on the side of the cam sprockets in the right orientation.

There are countless articles and YT videos that just talk about "adjusting the clearances on a VStrom" without specifying whether it's for a DL650 or a DL1000, but there is a big difference.
 

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Sorry, I meant on the sprocket pairs. The damned things were covered in marks when I did mine. NFUAL :). It was only discovering those marks cast into the cam bridges that allowed me to get it back together correctly in a reasonable time.
 

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Well, the good thing about the sprocket pairs being marked multiple times, is that the PO apparently did do his checks and adjustments diligently. That's not just good for the valve clearances themselves, but probably also tells you something about how he or she approached other maintenance tasks.
 

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The PO had never done a V-twin. I got it cheap because it ran poorly, they'd obviously done i4's and had the valve clearances on the rear pot swapped around. As you said, someone had been in there, the non-zuk shim was a giveaway and screwed up. Guessing a dealer mechanic.

I mean, whoevers mistake saved me ~3k and since I fixed that it does run very well but at the time it was WTF ????. Why are these so far out.
 

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...The DL650 has a cam chain that runs over the cam sprockets. This means the cam chain has to be loosened, and the chain and sprockets carefully marked, before you can remove the cams to get to the shim buckets. If you let go of the chain during the process it can also drop off the crankshaft sprocket. And the rear cam chain tensioner is a bitch to access. That makes the adjustment process on a DL650 very tricky...
Pro tips... 😉

Zip tie the chain to the sprocket.
Remove the rear wheel for tensioner access.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I over-looked a needed tool. A spark plug socket. The ones I have are too thick walled for use. Partzilla shows the wrench with the part # 09930-10190 for $33.95 + S/H (correct tool?). Any non-OEM alternatives? My Bandit 1250S came with the socket wrench in the tool kit, a bonus.
 

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I over-looked a needed tool. A spark plug socket. The ones I have are too thick walled for use. Partzilla shows the wrench with the part # 09930-10190 for $33.95 + S/H (correct tool?). Any non-OEM alternatives? My Bandit 1250S came with the socket wrench in the tool kit, a bonus.
Harbor Freight...
 
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