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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all

I have pretty much decided that I am going for the 2014 vstrom 1000. I was reading about it and found out that the fuel should be at least at 90 octanes.

I was wondering what do you guys do if you are riding to those remote places where they only have regular gas? Are there any fuel additives that can boost the octane levels?

Thanks in advance.
 

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I was reading about it and found out that the fuel should be at least at 90 octanes.
What system? What part of the world?

There are two systems of measuring the gasoline's octane rating. Research Octane Number (RON) is one way to test. A different test is the Motor Octane Number (MON). They test different attributes of the gasoline. Most of of the world uses RON. The U.S. & Canada use an Anti-knock Index (AKI) that is the numerical average of RON & MON. The AKI number is about 4 to 5 points lower than the RON for the same gas.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What system? What part of the world?

There are two systems of measuring the gasoline's octane rating. Research Octane Number (RON) is one way to test. A different test is the Motor Octane Number (MON). They test different attributes of the gasoline. Most of of the world uses RON. The U.S. & Canada use an Anti-knock Index (AKI) that is the numerical average of RON & MON. The AKI number is about 4 to 5 points lower than the RON for the same gas.
Well in the US.

So what if the anti knock index is lower than recommended then can it be improved by additives?
 

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I wouldn't obsess about it. I asked the Suzuki rep about it at an IMS show. He claims they will run on regular but that its not optimum for the bike.
It is a bad show on Suzuki's part to build a so called 'adventure bike' that needs premium but they're not the only ones to do so.
As for octane booster it can be bought commonly in many shops, you can always chuck a bottle in your saddle bag for just in case if it worries you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I wouldn't obsess about it. I asked the Suzuki rep about it at an IMS show. He claims they will run on regular but that its not optimum for the bike.
It is a bad show on Suzuki's part to build a so called 'adventure bike' that needs premium but they're not the only ones to do so.
As for octane booster it can be bought commonly in many shops, you can always chuck a bottle in your saddle bag for just in case if it worries you.
I had the same question in mind. I am planning to attend Suzuki bike show in the month of June and will ask the same question to the rep.

Thanks
 

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Hello all

I have pretty much decided that I am going for the 2014 vstrom 1000. I was reading about it and found out that the fuel should be at least at 90 octanes.

I was wondering what do you guys do if you are riding to those remote places where they only have regular gas? Are there any fuel additives that can boost the octane levels?

Thanks in advance.
If you are riding in the U.S.A., I have never encountered a station that did not have high octane fuel. Maybe 40-50 years ago, but not now. I would be shocked if you were not able to find high octane gas at any station in the U.S.A.
 

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If you are riding in the U.S.A., I have never encountered a station that did not have high octane fuel. Maybe 40-50 years ago, but not now. I would be shocked if you were not able to find high octane gas at any station in the U.S.A.
Get ready to be shocked then because I can show you numerous stations in small towns that don't offer premium fuel. Its not that uncommon really.
 

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If you are riding in the U.S.A., I have never encountered a station that did not have high octane fuel. Maybe 40-50 years ago, but not now. I would be shocked if you were not able to find high octane gas at any station in the U.S.A.
I find premium to be much harder to find in the remote areas than beer in a dry county. My other bikes require premium; nice to have a bike that doesn't should I have as much trouble finding it as I have in the past (always carried a bottle of octane booster, not anymore.).
 

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Higher octane in a low compression engine does not give you more power, if anything it takes away power. Here is a good explanation on fuel from Dragon racing fuels that was posted on vitalmx.com.

"Fuel Facts from Dragon Racing Fuels



In our first segment of many I would like to help everyone learn more about performance fuels. We will go into more detail in the upcoming segments of fuel facts.

Possibly one of the most misunderstood parts of performance or racing in general is racing fuels. Most racers, parents, and mechanics have an opinion about what fuel works best for them but most are wrong or just do not understand what to look for in a racing fuel. Dragon Racing Fuels would like to take a few minutes to help explain just what racers need to know or what to look for in a performance fuel.

First things first, we must understand octane. What is octane? Octane actually has two definitions, one is that octane is a flammable hydrocarbon liquid that along with other hydrocarbons – pentane, hexane, heptanes, and many others – is refined from crude oil and make up the blend of chemical components called gasoline. That is a chemical definition of octane and the other is that octane is a measure of a fuels tendency knock or ping when mixed with air and burned in the cylinder of an engine. Plain and simple octane is used to measure a fuels ability to resist detonation.

The next thing we need to know is how is the octane rating determined? Gasoline is subject to testing methods to establish its octane rating. One called the motor method, which runs the gasoline in an engine under load and is listed as the MON. The other test is called the research octane and this is run without load and will show larger numbers. This method is listed as the RON. What you see at the pump when stop to get gas is a pump octane number, which is the RON+MON/2. It is the average of the motor octane and the research octane.

One of the biggest myths about octane is that the higher the octane the hotter and faster it burns. The second biggest myth being that the higher the octane the more horsepower it makes. Both of these crazy myths are far from true. Actually the higher the octane the slower and cooler the fuel will burn and octane does not equal horsepower. You should use the lowest octane fuel that your engine can safely perform on. Because once again octane does not equal horsepower! It only serves as a level of protection from detonation or better known as the Death Rattle.

Once we can get past the discussion of octane, we have several other things we can talk about, like burning speed, energy value, and cooling effect. The burn speed is the speed that a fuel will release its energy. So if the fuel is still trying to burn beyond the point of peak cylinder pressure performance will be sacrificed. The energy value is the potential energy the fuel can produce. The energy value of a fuel is measured in BTU and not in pounds and the cooling effect is related to heat vaporization. Which means the higher the fuels heat vaporization the better the fuel can cool the intake charge into the engine. This can have a big effect on horsepower in today’s engines.

One more thing in today’s world of race fuel is you can use an oxygenated fuel. An oxygenated fuel has chemical properties to contain and carry added oxygen in the intake charge of fuel. If tuned correctly, oxygenated fuels can and will produce more horsepower and torque over a nonoxygenated fuel.

Make sure you stay tuned to Vurbmoto.com for the next segment of fuel facts brought to you from Dragon Racing Fuels and find out how you can come close to picking the correct race fuel for your dirt scooter.

Mark Ticen – Dragon Racing Fuels, Fueling Your Passion!"
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I find premium to be much harder to find in the remote areas than beer in a dry county. My other bikes require premium; nice to have a bike that doesn't should I have as much trouble finding it as I have in the past (always carried a bottle of octane booster, not anymore.).
+1 and hence the reason of my post.

I currently ride kawasaki zx6r supersport and it takes 92 only. I have done 300+ mile touring rides on it and I have to make sure that my route passes through big enough cities where I can find premium gas. I have never tried octane booster though. In doubt, I always carry 2 gallon premium gas with me if my route goes through remote small towns.

People have told me that I should be using the sport bike as touring/adventure bike and I totally agree and thats the reason I am planning to switch from supersport to VStrom. :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Typo, "I shouldn't be using sport bike as touring.."

ah can't I edit a submitted post ? I don't see an option :(
 

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I have been cross country on a K1200lt, a can am spyder and also on my Wee. I needed premium on the first two and regular on the wee. The spyder got about 30mpg pulling a Aspen Camping trailer. The LT was pulling a one wheel Unigo. Even with the great MPG of the LT, I found myself many times buying regular instead of premium. I never noticed any problem. I highly recommend that if you in a remote place AND premium grade is available -----DO NOT BUY Premium!!!!!! The premium grade sits a lot longer in the tanks. Buy regular because the tanks are refilled much more often!!
 

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About octane boosters. Most boosters you find are not very honest about what they do. "RAISES OCTANE BY 3 POINTS!!!!!!" screams the label. Awesome, that would make my 87 stuff into the 90 I need, easy-peasy.

Not so fast. "Points" is the key. What they do is raise the octane by .3, not by 3. So you end up with 87.3 octane :) My Neon had a mod that allowed it to use +100 octane racing fuel by hitting a switch, so I got pretty smart on that, since racing fuel is crazy expensive. A company named Torco makes an additive that actually does significant changes. Not many others. So do be careful and read labels well.

http://www.amazon.com/Octane-Booster-Quarts-Torco-Accelerator/dp/B005S2BKDQ/ref=sr_1_4?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1402492704&sr=1-4
 

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I am shocked that premium unleaded is not prevalent in parts of the U.S.A. as others have attested. I incorrectly assumed that if this grade of fuel can be found in remote areas of the Northeast ( NY,N.H.,CT.,Vt.,Maine etc..), that should extrapolate to other parts of the country. My bad. :headbang:
 

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All the above discussion aside....

To the OP's original question regarding the 2014 Vee and what to do IF premium fuel is not available for whatever reason.... I can confirm that it runs just fine on Regular, as I absent-mindedly filled the tank with low-grade and decided to just run it and see how it did. No pings, no smoke, no death rattle, no alarms going off nor loss in performance, and I actually got very decent mileage for that tank.

Would I do it again or make a habit of it? Nope, not intentionally, but it's nice to know that it is not a show-stopper if that's all you can find.

Just not a big deal.

And GLHS837 is completely right about octane boosters. I wouldn't waste space carrying any.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
All the above discussion aside....

To the OP's original question regarding the 2014 Vee and what to do IF premium fuel is not available for whatever reason.... I can confirm that it runs just fine on Regular, as I absent-mindedly filled the tank with low-grade and decided to just run it and see how it did. No pings, no smoke, no death rattle, no alarms going off nor loss in performance, and I actually got very decent mileage for that tank.

Would I do it again or make a habit of it? Nope, not intentionally, but it's nice to know that it is not a show-stopper if that's all you can find.

Just not a big deal.

And GLHS837 is completely right about octane boosters. I wouldn't waste space carrying any.
Thanks for the info. Now I feel good about the 2014 vstrom 1000 :)
 

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If it's like modern cars that require premium, meaning it has good knock sensors and software, what happens is that the knock sensor and software are sensitive enough that it can detect knock or detonation at levels far below what can harm the engine, and the software will adjust ignition timing down to keep any harmful knock from happening. You lose power, but usually not enough for most folks to notice. You really have to be wringing it out to notice the loss, and since most folks never use %100 of the power their vehicle has no noticeable loss.
 

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Are you sure the Vee2 has knock sensors? They are not common on motorcycles.
 

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If you are riding in the U.S.A., I have never encountered a station that did not have high octane fuel. Maybe 40-50 years ago, but not now. I would be shocked if you were not able to find high octane gas at any station in the U.S.A.
I've come across it quite a bit.. a good friend has a BMW RT. It requires premium. We mainly ride secondary roads when travelling and found many small town gas stations did not have Super (and like someone here previously said the ones that did appeared of dubious quality.) Not sure exactly where but likely upstate New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia etc.

(We also discovered that many gas stations listed on the Garmin Database were long closed as well.)

..Tom
 
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