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Discussion Starter #1
so i decided that since it's been much colder lately, and i have been using my heated equipment more that i should actually see what they are consuming and compare that to what the bike is putting out for power.

the gear:
Oxford Heated Grips = 4 amps = 48 watts

Gerbing Heated Jacket Liner = 6.4 amp = 77 watts

now the bike is my beloved 07 wee, which i believe puts out 375 watts :confused:

if my math is right, i am only drawing 125 watts leaving me an extra 250 watts for other use? :thumbup:

i ask because i want to make sure my numbers look correct, and because i was concerned that if i was drawing too much power that i would have to/should be putting the bike on the battery tender over night..(i ride my bike every day as my commuter)

my ultimate fear would be to over load the system and burn or melt something...and i have a big list of farkles i eventually want and need to make sure my system can handle it all.

any help, comments, or corrections would be greatly appreciated! :hurray:
 

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Your math is right, but you forgot that the bike uses power too... Lights, fuel pump, charging the battery etc... You actually have about 150 watts of surplus power (the rest is used by the bike)... So you have have used up most of the spare wattage with your heated stuff...
 

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If the math is right don't the 100 watts of head light leave 150 and the brake etc takes more and then the engine electrical, fuel pump, spark plugs and ABS fro thems that got it.
As long as you running at 4K rpm and above there shouldn't be a battery maintaining issue.
No?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
wow, completely spaced on the power needed to run the bike...so the number is about 200 watts to power the bike? between headlights/lights, fuel pump, ignition, and so on...(i don't have ABS)...

so i only have an excess of 50 watts about then...so i should be careful when farkling up...

this may sound like a dumb question, but what happens if you consume more power than the alternator puts out? will the battery just drain? or will there be issues with things overheating and melting?

is there a way to lower the consumption of my lights? like LED's? or something?
 

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Greywolf will probably confirm... but my understanding (is) and depending on the year of you 650 (latter years have an up'd alternator output), you are looking at between 125 and 150 watts of spare alt power...
 

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Grey wolf uses a switch for one headlight. Saves 50 watts. A brilliant suggestion. Easter Beaver supplies such stuff?
And yes. If you have too many things turned on you can surpass the output and it will run the battery down as you ride.
Pulling the plug on one head light will be an easy temporary fix.
 

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It's not an exact measure because even things like the oil temperature play a part. The stator coils are oil cooled and put out more power when the oil is cold for example. Brake light use is a big draw so sitting at a traffic light with the brakes on will draw over 50W. A rule of thumb is to allow 250-275W for the bike's stock requirements. I recommend anyone even flirting with the limits mount a voltmeter on the bike. Equilibrium exists when the voltmeter reads about 12.6-12.8V. Above that and the system is charging. Below and the system is discharging the battery.

I like HID headlights for those using heated gear. Your get more light than stock 55/60W H4 halogens with 35W HIDs but they only draw around 40W including digital slim ballasts. HIDs show a steady light from 9-16V while halogens on a bike running variable heat controllers that cycle a portion of every second look like they are running headlight modulators.

The 375W on my 2007 Wee can handle a 90W jacket liner plus HotGrips but adding gloves will be too much if everything is turned up close to max. Using grips, jacket, gloves and socks requires my keeping an eye on the voltmeter and turning off one headlight if turning up the heat.

2002 DL1000s have 350W available and later models have 400W.

2004-2007 DL650s have 375W and later models have 400W.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's not an exact measure because even things like the oil temperature play a part. The stator coils are oil cooled and put out more power when the oil is cold for example. Brake light use is a big draw so sitting at a traffic light with the brakes on will draw over 50W. A rule of thumb is to allow 250-275W for the bike's stock requirements. I recommend anyone even flirting with the limits mount a voltmeter on the bike. Equilibrium exists when the voltmeter reads about 12.6-12.8V. Above that and the system is charging. Below and the system is discharging the battery.

I like HID headlights for those using heated gear. Your get more light than stock 55/60W H4 halogens with 35W HIDs but they only draw around 40W including digital slim ballasts. HIDs show a steady light from 9-16V while halogens on a bike running variable heat controllers that cycle a portion of every second look like they are running headlight modulators.

The 375W on my 2007 Wee can handle a 90W jacket liner plus HotGrips but adding gloves will be too much if everything is turned up close to max. Using grips, jacket, gloves and socks requires my keeping an eye on the voltmeter and turning off one headlight if turning up the heat.

2002 DL1000s have 350W available and later models have 400W.

2004-2007 DL650s have 375W and later models have 400W.
so it seems as if according your rule of thumb i have used up all my "extra" output.

i have been thinking about installing a voltmeter, do you have a suggestion for one? i would assume they are inexpensive? they should also be wired to switched power as well?

looks like i should also look into HID's and/or the headlight eliminator kit from EB.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I don't have a favorite voltmeter. Many are available. My preference is to wire it to switched power.
 

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Voltmeter and brakelight question

I hope this isn't against the rules to post this, but I have an ADV Monster voltmeter that does the trick. Brakelight question: can you simply switch the bulb out for the same base type of LED? Or does this cause issues? (ie: I think I've read that some turn signal systems are incompatible with LED bulbs not drawing enough current? Not sure if the bike needs to see some draw at the tail light??)
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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An 1157 type red LED will work electrically. It needs to physically be able fit through the hole in the housing and be bright. 3W is probably the minimum.

Those using a CCS100 or Rostra cruise control need to install a relay to ground the unit and break ground when the brakes are activated, They normally use the brake light wire to sense ground through the filament so they go off when the brake light is activated. An LED doesn't have a filament so the CC will "think" the brakes are always on and will not activate.

LED turn signals can be used by replacing the flasher with an LED friendly type.
 

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I've heard about some LED's not working as well though as they create the "hotspots" behind the lens as opposed to lighting the entire lens, like what occurs with an incandescent bulb.

Does anyone have recommendations for an LED that doesn't produce the "hotspots" and distributes the light fairly evenly.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The hotspots are created by this type of LED light which shields the LED from the reflector in the light housing.



These types with multiple LEDs use the reflector.

 
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