StromTrooper banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Next month I'm planning my fist trip on my new Wee. Heading north from NJ I'm hoping to ride up through NY state and head over the the Green Mountains in VT. From there over to the White Mountains and Mt Washington in NH and from there (depending on time and weather) maybe over into Maine before returning to NJ. Might get as far as Acadia.

Probably mostly riding on paved roads in the National Forests. This is a solo trip so I won't be doing much (if any) riding on dirt roads. Self recovery isn't fun in case of an accident and I'm no longer young enough to think that hauling a bike out of the mud and pushing it a few miles is fun (or even possible...).

Just wondering if anyone has any favorite (simple, cheap) motels in the Green and White mountains area (should such things exist). All I need is a roof and a bed, nothing fancy! Well, maybe a TV too. I know the Acadia area quite well, so I'm OK there for cheap motels and campgrounds.

I'll probably bring along a small tent and would consider camping as long as it's not raining. I think I get wetter lying in this tent than riding the bike when it rains!

Any comments on the roads in the Green/White mountains area would also be welcome. I've never ridden or driven there before.
 

·
What Kinda Bike Is That?
Joined
·
5,520 Posts
I know the Acadia area quite well, so I'm OK there for cheap motels and campgrounds.
When, and if you get here, please contact me.

Barry B.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Camping in the Green Mtn National Forest

BobA:

Green Mountain Shooter here. If you are planning on heading up into the Northern half of the GMNF I can suggest lots of places to camp at no charge. I live in the Mad River Valley and am very familiar with the camping along Route 100 from Rochester, VT to Warren, VT. If you are traveling along the Western flank of the Green Mountains I can check my maps and perhaps make suggestions as well. Send me a PM if this is your planned route.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the tips so far. I suspect the smaller, cheaper motels probably don't get listed on the usual big travel sites and may not even have a web page. Makes them hard to find before a trip!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
There is no shortage of places to stay in the North Country. Bring your Credit Card, your tent and stop worrying about it. If you can't find a cheap motel. You can find a campground.

I've found that if you stop for dinner at a local place and ask someone where there is a decent cheap motel they all know where it is. Sometimes they will explain to you the price per hour... That usually is a hint not to go there :)

When I'm out and about, I hate picking a place too far in advance. It limits my ability to just take a right and see where that road goes. Also, it makes me either push a bit further or pull up a bit early.

I tend to start looking for something a few hours before I'm going to stop. To each his own though. Most important is to go and enjoy yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I'm in southern VT right on RT100. Near the Mass,NH and NY borders.Green Mountain National Forest is right here, some inexpensive campsites, lean to's etc. Depending on when you're here the hotel I work at would be perfect for you. PM me if ya want. I'd love to meet someone who rides a Strom. I've only seen the one I hope to purchase in the showroom. Drooling, waiting for BRC in Sept.

Nardy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,227 Posts
Smuggler's Notch

Smuggler's Notch State Park has a very nice campground in VT. It's very clean, quiet and well run. Also tons of nice riding to be done in the area. I'll be staying there the weekend of the Sept 23 and attending the Stowe Oktoberfest.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,198 Posts
A lot of campgrounds have lean-to's. Is that an option?

We've stayed a few times at the state campground on Mount Sunapee. Sites are roomy, most have lean-to's, water faucets nearby but no showers. $23-29 per night.

Red Roof Inn in Loudon NH is cheap especially if you have triple A. NHMS is just up the road. There are several relatively inexpensive hotels in Concord NH as well.

There are a number of inexpensive hotels on Rt 7 just South of Burlington VT. Most of them are bad and I don't recommend a single one of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
The Lady and I just came back from 10 days in VT. Deeeeelightful.

New Discovery Park in Groton National Forest did the trick for us, as did a NFS site, Chittenden Brook.

I am convinced there are no bad roads in Vermont, btw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Reply to Places to Stay in Southern VT/NH

Bob:

With a map on your desk I can provide the following suggestions.

The usual Western mid-Southern route into VT from NY is U.S. Rt.4 that will take you through Rutland and Woodstock. My suggestion is to stay off of the U.S. highways for the most part, VT is short on 4 lane highways and the U.S. highways (with the exception of U.S. Rt. 7 in Southern VT and Rt. 4 from Fair Haven to Rutland) are all 2 lane highways with lots of traffic (by Vermont standards). Get a VT road map or get on Google maps and find the VT State highways. If you stay West of the spine of the Green Mtns. you will be riding in open farmland with beautiful views.

You are correct about the national forest, you can camp where you want unless it is posted as no camping. An advantage of the U.S. highways is that there are small motels along them, and they are usually not booked as most people are at the Holiday Inn or Hampton Inn. If you have the time, I highly recommend taking the time to travel through VT at 50 mph on the state roads with lots of small unique shops and restos to visit. Just plan your trip so you can be traveling on the U.S. highways late in the day to find an inexpensive place to stay. In the older mom and pop style motels you can expect to pay around $50.00 per night. There are lots of these along U.S. Rt. 5, which travels North and South along the Western side of the Connecticut River in VT. Judging from your route description it will only take you two days and a night to go from Southern VT up to mid-state for the night and then into NH. Again, if you have the time I can’t overemphasize taking the VT State highways. When you get on the Eastern side of the mountains you will be following the rivers as they flow down out of the mountains, most of which will flow into the Connecticut River which forms the border with NH.

Again, in NH get a map and follow the state roads, stay off of the U.S. highways for the most part. Looking at a NH map you want to travel on the Kangamancus highway (NH Rt. 12 from Lincoln to Conway), or through Crawford Notch or Pinkham Notch. The notches runs North and South, and the Kangamancus Highway runs East and West through the White Mtn National Forest. Again, as this is national forest there are lots of public camping areas that all you do is fill out an envelope and put your money in it for the night and drop in it a pipe. Get a detailed map of the WMNF and these campgrounds will be listed. You can call the WHNF and pay over the phone and I believe they will mail it to you. Lots of info on the USFS website as well.

Maine. Is a big state. The best way to travel North and South is on Interstate 95 until you get close to where you want to go. If you try riding up U.S. Rt.1 it will take you forever. However, once you get above Rockland the traffic should thin out ( if I remember correctly, I lived in Maine for 3 years before I moved to VT). Acadia is stupendous, as Black Lab and others will attest to.

Have a great trip, and the one thing I always struggle with is slowing down to appreciate where I am. And don’t forget to take lots of photos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
898 Posts
Bob:

With a map on your desk I can provide the following suggestions.

The usual Western mid-Southern route ....
GREAT post with LOTS of great info that I can put to good use. Just "stuck my toe in the water" last weekend on a ride up to Bennington and am anxious to explore more of VT and upper NH.

Ever ridden up to Lake Willoughby and camped/motelled?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Lake Willoughby/Northeast Kingdom

BaBaAus:

The area North of U.S. Rt. 2 and East of I-91 (my definition of the Northeast Kingdom) is a great riding and camping area in VT. For the camping part I suggest the following as I have camped there often.

North out of Island Pond on VT 114, to just before Norton Pond, head West on the Hurricane Rd. into the Bill Sladyk Wildlife Management Area (WMA). Stay on the main road and it will take you into a F&W managed camping area with outhouses and primitive camping. I have camped here for years during grouse season and it's really nice. The ride in is on 1.5 lane dirt and is flat.

Another great dirt road area is East out of Island Pond on VT Rt. 105. I suggest google maps to start researching the following. You want to ride East until you get to the Wenlock WMA, on the South side of Rt. 105. The VT Fish and Wildlife website offers maps of the WMAs so be sure to research there. Head South into Wenlock (right after a rail road crossing) and either stay on the main road or, if you have either good map navigation skills or a GPS, head out and explorer. This will take you into the West Mountain WMA with some off the beaten path camping sites. You will not find them on a map, just look for the old fire rings at the old logging landings and spurs. This road is usually not maintained very well, and this past spring I had to navigate some washed out culverts. There are traditional use camps around the area that are used frequently so the road is always passable.

If you stay on the main (dirt) road it will eventually take to you to the Paul Stream Rd. and that will connect to Maidstone Lake State Park. Nice place to camp but it closes in Sept. I believe. Check the VT parks and rec website for details.

For the more adventurous (referring to a detailed VT map) you can ride South on the Paul Stream Rd down to a little town called Granby. I have seen people drive this road in a two wheeled auto, but for reference it's best driven in 4WD. Not sure I would ride it alone on my DL650 without driving it first, or doing a group ride for assistance when the road gets problematic.

There is also the power line cut for the Hydro Quebec transmission line that comes out of Canada that somewhat parallels the Paul Stream Road. Gravel and steep hills but incredible riding. I have driven it in my Jeep but not on the scoot.

The nice thing about riding/camping around Maidstone is that if you come out of the campground and head East you will come out on VT Rt. 102 that follows the Connecticut River, and you can either head South and hook up with U.S. Rt. 2 (major two lane highway in Northern New England, or you can head North on 102 and do a nice loop North to Canaan, VT, West to Norton, VT (just South of the Canadian border) and then South on 114 back to Island Pond.

Hope that gives you some ideas. Again, as much as I despise google, their map page is a good first reference for route planning. Any questions let me know.

GMS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
898 Posts
Thank you for the great info!

Damn that Irene! But I just might head north thataway after Labor Day. Thank you thank you!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top