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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Folks,
I want to purchase the Piaa 510's but I can't decide between the crystal ion (yellow) and the super white. Most of my driving is on the highway so far. I want it to look like an aircraft is landing on the highway. Mostly so that I can see the Bambi's from 10 miles away. So my question is....which ones would you buy??? :?:
 

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Piaa 510's

Hi,

I justed wanted to let you know that I have over 5 sets of
Piaa lights in various models.
I do have the 510's.
Make sure that you put the Super White 510's on your bike
they seem to be twice as bright.
Take it from someone who knows PIAA.
Good Luck,


Troy :p
 

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Narrow beams will go way down the road forever but the wide beam will light up the sides of the road better for leaping bambi. My choice would be better and brighter bulbs in the Strom headlites and wide beam driving lites.
 

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Tyblaney, most of my experience comes from cages at nite but much of it applies to bikes. The biggest difference on a bike is when you lean it and the light pretty much goes away in the direction of your turn when low beam is on. Have Silverstars in the Wee but actually have ridden it at nite since installing them. Having a couple 35 watt driving lites on the forks would be a bonus when riding with lowbeam on. Also, when lightly loaded at nite, crank down the rear preload and the low beam will reach out a little further.
 

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Personally, I would go with white lights. To many people, fog lights = yellow, driving lights = white, but that's simply untrue. There are white fog lights and amber driving lights. The belief that amber light is best for fog and rain is based on a misunderstanding of Raleygh scattering. The thought is the frequency of yellow light is backscattered less than white light, but fog and rain droplets are large enough to reflect back amber and white light equally. Amber lights are better in snow though, because there is better contrast with, and less glare reflected off of, snow-covered surfaces. Colored lights are usually made that way by tinting the glass, which absorbs some of the light they're trying to produce. So if you're not riding in snow, white lights would be better because they're brighter.

Now, driving vs. fog pattern depends on how you want to use them.

Driving lights cast their light in a narrow, circular beam, like a spotlight, illuminating the road far ahead of the vehicle. The beam angle is very narrow, usually in the range of 10-15 degrees, though some lights are as narrow as 5 degrees. They're sometimes referred to as "pencil beams" because the shaft of light is long and narrow like a pencil. Think of them as supplimentary high beams.

Fog lights cast their light in a very wide beam with a sharp cutoff across the top. 90 degrees is a typical beam spread from a decent set, and I've heard of beams as wide as 120 degrees. The intent of a fog light is to illuminate as much of the road in front of and around the vehicle without shining light on the droplets of water vapor in front of the driver's line of sight, which would reflect back as blinding glare. Their wide beam also makes them useful for lighting up corners and things along the side of the road waiting to jump out in front of you, and the beam cutoff means they won't blind oncoming traffic so they can be thought of as supplimentary low beams.

Because they serve different purposes, they are also best mounted in different locations. Since fog lights are designed to cast their beam of light underneath the rain and fog droplets that are at eye level, they are also usually mounted down low. However, the lower you mount the lights, the longer the shadows they cast. This won't do for driving lights. They're intended to light up the road as much as possible, so they are frequently mounted up high to provide flatter lighting. Motorcycles are a bit limited as to where you can mount lights, but on a rally bike fog lights are usually found on the forks or fender, while driving lights are up next to the windscreen.

Sorry for being so long-winded, I didn't set out to write a crash-course in auxilliary lighting. I could go into some more detail about bulbs, and the design and materials used in reflectors and lenses (or, "Why aren't my $20 Wally World lights as bright as my buddy's $200 PIAA's when they draw the same wattage?"), but I'll leave that for another time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Holy Christ JetJaguar!!

You are the man!!!! :twisted: I now know who to contact when I want some information on lighting! Thanks you so much. I think that when it comes down to lighting I will be purchasing the Piaa 510 super white wide beams. (shown in www.amotostuff.com) With you experience would you agree this is a good choice :?:
 

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Hella has a pretty good choice of driving lights with various reaches and widths in their beams.
 

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tyblaney said:
Holy Christ JetJaguar!!

You are the man!!!! :twisted: I now know who to contact when I want some information on lighting! Thanks you so much. I think that when it comes down to lighting I will be purchasing the Piaa 510 super white wide beams. (shown in www.amotostuff.com) With you experience would you agree this is a good choice :?:
Well, seems everyone is picky about something. Some have elaborate chain cleaning rituals, for others it's a never-ending quest for the perfect windshield. Good lighting is my thing. PIAAs are a good light, if a little pricey. Hellas are also very good, and a coworker who's into Jeep offroading swears by KC Daylighters, says they have the best vibration protection (but I think he just likes them for the smiley-face covers :)).

FWIW, those super white 510's are at the top of my short list of what I'm going to be putting on my bike. I'm going with a fog pattern light because I want to light up things along the side of the road and I can leave them on all the time which would make me more visible. Plus, I don't get a chance to ride with my high beams on very much, so I wouldn't get as much use out of driving lights. If I found that in my riding I used the high beams a lot, then I'd probably go with driving lights instead. My dream setup would be a set of fog lights plus a single HID spotlight, switched independently. HID's are about 3 to 4 times brighter than halogens, but very pricey (~$600 each) and realistically, I wouldn't use it often enough to justify the price.
 

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FWIW i have experience with HELLA, PIAA and KC, i go jeeping, stromming and we use hella lighting on our heavy rescue trucks at work. KC is nice for jeeping but a hell of a lot of draw on the electrical system. i went with the wide patten on my 510s for side of the road illumination, i'm terrified of hitting a deer, i've been EXTREMELY lucky to not have pegged one yet and i'm hoping lighting up the side of the road will shift the odds in my favor. I'm also a fan of the adage "don't over drive your lights" and honestly, i can go fast enough to scare myself without more lighting range to encourage me to increase speed!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
JetJaguar said:
tyblaney said:
Holy Christ JetJaguar!!

You are the man!!!! :twisted: I now know who to contact when I want some information on lighting! Thanks you so much. I think that when it comes down to lighting I will be purchasing the Piaa 510 super white wide beams. (shown in www.amotostuff.com) With you experience would you agree this is a good choice :?:
Well, seems everyone is picky about something. Some have elaborate chain cleaning rituals, for others it's a never-ending quest for the perfect windshield. Good lighting is my thing. PIAAs are a good light, if a little pricey. Hellas are also very good, and a coworker who's into Jeep offroading swears by KC Daylighters, says they have the best vibration protection (but I think he just likes them for the smiley-face covers :)).

FWIW, those super white 510's are at the top of my short list of what I'm going to be putting on my bike. I'm going with a fog pattern light because I want to light up things along the side of the road and I can leave them on all the time which would make me more visible. Plus, I don't get a chance to ride with my high beams on very much, so I wouldn't get as much use out of driving lights. If I found that in my riding I used the high beams a lot, then I'd probably go with driving lights instead. My dream setup would be a set of fog lights plus a single HID spotlight, switched independently. HID's are about 3 to 4 times brighter than halogens, but very pricey (~$600 each) and realistically, I wouldn't use it often enough to justify the price.
Jaguar,
Do I need to change anything electrically with adding the 510's? Keep in mind I have a stock K6 1000. How would you wire these babies up?? :?:
 

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Over driving your lites is a recipe for disaster at the best of times.
 
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