StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Not exactly vstrom related. But if you use a PLB do you carry it on the bike or in your jacket. In jacket I am concerned about damage in a get off. On the bike concerned about being separated from the bike. Thoughts? ?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,498 Posts
Ram holder on the bars with flat front facing up for the best satellite connection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,492 Posts
Not exactly vstrom related. But if you use a PLB do you carry it on the bike or in your jacket. In jacket I am concerned about damage in a get off. On the bike concerned about being separated from the bike. Thoughts? ?

I carried a Spot Tracker for years and went through the same debate. I had the first generation and it didn't reliably send out tracks in my jacket pocket so it ended up in my tank bag.

New ones probably work better in a jacket and that's where I would carry it. If you get tossed off and hurt you could notify emergency services without having to crawl back to your bike! The Spot I had was pretty tough, if the crash was bad enough to bust it up... :jawdrop: game over man!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,273 Posts
I'm more concerned about broken ribs/punctured lungs when carrying it in my jacket. My SPOT is mounted to the bike. Usually when riding off road I'm with buddies. They can push the button for me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
I keep it in the tank bag, and also have a ham radio APRS tracker that sends out a location beacon every minute or two.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
851 Posts
There is another advantage to carrying your Spot in your tank bag. This is story I posted on another forum.

My friend Patrick was touring northern Thailand on a rented motorcycle. He borrowed my Spot Tracker for the trip. It's been fun watching his tracks over the past couple of days. The Spot transmits your location every ten minutes. I have the app loaded on my Iphone that shows the pings on a map. Last night I got a text from him that he lost a bag off the back of his bike and the Spot is in the bag. Could I please send him the last known coordinates. I texted him the last location and also the location of the police station nearest the last known Spot location. I then took a screen shot of the location as shown on the app and texted that to him.

Here is the story as told by Patrick.
"First of , everything is fine. I just screwed up this morning while getting gasoline and left a bag sitting on the back of the bike. It fell in the roadway as I drove off and someone picked it up and took it home.
Turns out, in this high-tech world, the spot tracking device was in the bag and Jeff checked online and send me the GPS coordinates by text. I found the police station and they got a whole Hawaii 5O on us and were able to locate the address from the GPS coordinates. I rode out to the house with four police officers and they retrieved my bag with camera and The tracking device.

The poor woman who found it looked quite dismayed. She said she had waited a long time before taking it home. The police took pictures of her ID, and another with her and I together along with the bag. I have no idea if they consider Her a potential good Samaritan or a person of interest. I apologize for creating so much trouble for everyone.

Meanwhile, back at the station, all the cops pose for a group photos with me and the bag. Not having any donuts handy, I gave a bunch of fancy Cliff bars and sweets to the detective.
Then it was back into the official report. The officer and I sat and he dictated the report two and efficient and attractive Thai woman with excellent penmanship. She hand wrote the report, making a carbon copy. We all signed it and I got the carbon copy. Interesting contrast between high-tech and old school.

So, I got on the road three hours late but have an adventure to talk about.
I hope I finally learned a lesson, having done this before.

The Bumbleheaded adventurer
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,175 Posts
I really want one of these for my trip, but the costs associated with it are ridiculous really. It would be cheaper to buy life insurance and die, but then i don't really like that option either.

Maybe i will just be sure not to crash into a Moose or Deer, or get a flat tire, or somehow stop that guy having a heart attack from coming into my lane. ;)

That was a great story Dravnx.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,722 Posts
Well, it is called a "Personal" locator beacon as opposed to a "Motorcycle" locator beacon. I'd be inclined to keep mine on my person if I had one.
 

·
Bikeless 4 now
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
I've been using my Spot 1 for years for peace of mind for my wife (and friends). 2 years ago I took a 7000 mile 13 day trip out to Yellowstone, Rockies, Tetons, etc. in July and everybody watched my link and lived vicariously through my posts. You can get them for free with a rebate now and then and it's about $150/year for tracking. I'll bet many of you spend more than that at Starbucks. It's a matter of perspective. I'll always have one. That said, mine is mounted to my clutch reservoir on a RAM mount so I can easily hit the button to send an "I'm OK" email to friends and family periodically.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
A PLB is different then the spot. I went with A PLB where you only press the button if you are in serious need of life saving help. I think I will put in a lower jacket pocket. If I went off hill and got injured and separated from the bike that would make more sense.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
851 Posts
I debated whether to get a PLB or the SPOT. I liked the tracking idea. It was fun watching my bud on his travels through Thailand and then when I did my last trip through Baja, my friends and family could watch my progress and live vicariously through me. The SPOT 3 also has 3 programmable buttons. I programed one for "I'm still having fun". I sent this one at least once a day. Another is programmed to say "I'm having problems, I'm not injured but pay attention to my location" The third button was programmed "I am having serious problems, figure out where I am and start looking for help". Of course, the SOS is button is preprogrammed to alert the International Emergency Response Center who will notify the local authorities for you.

They have specials on occasion with rebates that make the unit practically free with a subscription.

I carry mine in my pocket when I'm alone and mounted to a RAM when I'm with others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
I have been carrying a McMurdo FastFind PLB for a few years and debated where to stow it. Was in a handlebar bag and now carry it in a Kriega backpack but want to make a padded holster that I can attach to my upper thigh with velcro and a nylon webbing lanyard attached to the belt of my riding pants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,273 Posts
A PLB is great and a one time expense. But it's nice to be able to send that "OK" message out when in the middle of BFE setting up camp with no cell signal. It's also nice to be able to look back at how much ground you covered on those days. I'll always have a SPOT, 150 dollars a year is penauts compared to how much I spend on gasoline and booze anyway.

Everyone argues that the PLB gets help more relaibly since the PLB goes though the Air Force. In the end Air Force or private company the same people get called and that's the local authorities who will send out a local SAR team if needed. Or you could just get Sheriff Bob in his Pickup that shows up to help you.

If I didn't have a SPOT I would at least carry a PLB with me. But I like the extra abilities of the SPOT device in the end.

https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php?id=775851fc4e961aa40
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
A PLB is great and a one time expense. But it's nice to be able to send that "OK" message out when in the middle of BFE setting up camp with no cell signal. It's also nice to be able to look back at how much ground you covered on those days. I'll always have a SPOT, 150 dollars a year is penauts compared to how much I spend on gasoline and booze anyway.

Everyone argues that the PLB gets help more relaibly since the PLB goes though the Air Force. In the end Air Force or private company the same people get called and that's the local authorities who will send out a local SAR team if needed. Or you could just get Sheriff Bob in his Pickup that shows up to help you.

If I didn't have a SPOT I would at least carry a PLB with me. But I like the extra abilities of the SPOT device in the end.

https://spotwalla.com/tripViewer.php?id=775851fc4e961aa40
Yes, there is no annual subscription cost for a PLB but it is not truly a "one time expense" as the batteries in the models I have researched are good for 5-6 years and then the unit has to be sent away to have the batteries replaced. According to the dealer that I bought the unit from (mountain equipment coop in Canada): Replacing the battery costs almost 80% of the unit, so replacing the whole unit for a fresh one is a popular route to take. I paid $210 for mine, a newer unit is now $285 so that produces a yearly cost in the $30-$50 range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
I carry Spot 3 on Ram on bike.
Also carry Plb on my body.
Use the Spot for normal tracking, breakdowns, showing significant others my position and stops.
If I can reach the Spot after an off then ok, if not and lying in a ditch somewhere then hopefully still have the Plb.
Can't allow for every eventuality though.
Hope I never have to use it in emergency but good to have.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Also from what I have read seems like the PLB are supposed to have much more transmission power and higher reliability if really needed. I guess some of it comes down to why you are carrying one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,273 Posts
I'd have to see the transmitter specs on a common PLB vs a SPOT. The PLB has to play the line between power output and battery life. It needs to be able to run for the long haul after being activated. I'm not sure if the SPOT boosts power output when you push the 911 button but the Tracking feature will run for something like 7 days continusouly on the SPOT 1 which in my experience is a conservative measurement as mine has ran for two weeks constant on in tracking mode.

The later model SPOTS are known to have a slightly lower battery life due to use of AAAs instead of AAs from my understanding.

Either way the SPOT has gotten the job done in the past. I will say some of the PLBs incorporate a "homing" beacon. Basically it transmits at 406mhz to the satalitte and also transmits at 121.5mhz for tracking equipment to home in on you at closer range. I used to work with PLBs and ELTs when I was in the Civil Air Patrol and they are pretty accurate. ONce the 406mhz beacons started coming online it became even easier to find them. Now I work in Flight Equipment in the aviation world and deal with emergency radios/beacons on military gear and aircraft.

I like the looks of this one. As small as a pack of cigarattes and runs at 5 watts of output power (I'd guess this is standard but not sure). Supposed to work for 48 hours.

http://www.amazon.com/Personal-Locator-Beacon-MicroPLB-High-Reliability/dp/B00GCERP10/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1431873575&sr=8-8&keywords=plb+personal+locator+beacon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Reported missing first???

Is it true that for a PLB to work, someone has to report you missing first, then the authorities look for the signal, or react to the signal you have activated on your PLB?

I have seen one of the PLB's on Amazon explain that in their description.

If that is true then it is really a back up to a SPOT type device, as you need a responsible party and known checkpoint times in your plan. For day travel, sure, you don't come home, wife calls authorities, on a multiday without comm that could mean days before they even look for you.....the devices only last 48 hours once activated.

Being lost is one thing, going down on a bike usually means you need help asap, even waiting the few hours for SPOT rescue could mean death from injuries but its a fighting chance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,492 Posts
Is it true that for a PLB to work, someone has to report you missing first, then the authorities look for the signal, or react to the signal you have activated on your PLB?

I have seen one of the PLB's on Amazon explain that in their description.

If that is true then it is really a back up to a SPOT type device, as you need a responsible party and known checkpoint times in your plan. For day travel, sure, you don't come home, wife calls authorities, on a multiday without comm that could mean days before they even look for you.....the devices only last 48 hours once activated.

Being lost is one thing, going down on a bike usually means you need help asap, even waiting the few hours for SPOT rescue could mean death from injuries but its a fighting chance.

A PLB has a unique serial number that it transmits when activated. When you purchase the unit you register your information.

When the PLB is activated the alert system goes active on it's serial number.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top