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Happened four times in as many hours, yesterday, and I was starting to think it's a problem because of the recently-lowered pegs but from what I'm gathered reading other "peg scrape" threads, here, it's more suggestive of riding technique needing improvement? What's this about "leaning more towards the 'inside' in a turn"?
 

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A short way before you start the turn (let's assume a left curve) shift your butt on the seat to the left side of the seat. The bike will be canted to the right. Twist your hips to the left so your right knee is lightly against the tank with your left knee dangling out. Lean your shoulders way left so you are looking over your left mirror, turn your head to look to the turn exit, and keep your eyes level. Push on your left grip to turn. Roll on the throttle. When it is time to straighten pull back on the left grip. Re center yourself if you're going straight; go all the above to the other side for a right turn.
 

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A short way before you start the turn (let's assume a left curve) shift your butt on the seat to the left side of the seat. The bike will be canted to the right. Twist your hips to the left so your right knee is lightly against the tank with your left knee dangling out. Lean your shoulders way left so you are looking over your left mirror, turn your head to look to the turn exit, and keep your eyes level. Push on your left grip to turn. Roll on the throttle. When it is time to straighten pull back on the left grip. Re center yourself if you're going straight; go all the above to the other side for a right turn.
That's a great description of the technique, but it should be noted that unless you're really hauling ass, you don't have to hang your butt off the seat and drag a knee to get lots of benefit from shifting weight. Doing all the upper body stuff described above ("kiss the mirror") will usually change the center of gravity enough to avoid scraping the pegs.
 

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Well, not really hanging the butt off and dragging a knee, but more of just shifting to the side with both sit-bones still on the seat, and just letting the knee dangle. Riding with the balls of the feet on the pegs is a help, also.

Yes, merely leaning the body toward the pavement is a huge improvement. Many riders keep their body upright while they tilt the bike into the turn, actually lean away from the turn, and reduce ground clearance. Many more sit rigid on the bike like they're afraid to move a muscle (and they probably are, 'cuz they don't know what to do or what will happen if they move). Getting loose and feeling able to move on the bike is good and allows us to ride better in some unexpected situations.

Teaching oneself to lean toward the pavement takes effort. And, as always, we actually move much less than we think we move. What most of us consider a moderate movement would actually be a small movement if we could see a picture of ourselves.
 

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My pegs are not lowered but the suspension id old, 55K miles and I get the pegs to scrape at speed occasionally. I'm not a fan of leaving the seat to keep the bike more upright. Scares the crap out of me as it is! Lowered pegs just puts them closer to the ground. Ever watch a Harley with floor boards in the twisties?
Go slower, raise the ride height or raise the pegs or hang off and get the bike away from the ground.
If you buy really cheap tires they will inspire so little confidence that you won't be inclined to ride like a GP rider! :green_lol:
 

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Thank you, Gentlemen, for the advice! I've got some "practicing" to do!
one thing no one mentioned was all of this butt moving/ shifting should be done before the corner so you don't upset the balance of the bike as you enter the corner... Thanks to Keith Code
 

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True enough about moving to the position before the corner. Just watch the racers, they move like crazy setting up for the next corner. Done well, it's very graceful.
 

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As with a lot of movements, the timing isn't what we think it is. An early start to the movement likely finishes at the right time. A start when we think the timing is right likely ends up late.

It is easy to practice. On a straight, safe, 25 mph road, lightly put your weight on the pegs and shift your weight to the side of the seat, to the left to practice for a left turn. Lean your body to the left of the windscreen. Keep your eyes level. The bike is now running straight but canted to the right. It'll want to turn right, so a light pull on the left grip is needed to keep running straight. If you were making a left curve now, you'd just push on the left grip, and around you go. Re-center, repeat getting over to the left. Re-center and repeat several times. Now try to the right several times. Easy. When you're feeling good about moving on the bike and use it in curves, it'll feel really smooth with the bike in more control than ever.

The bike corners better when it is more upright. Aside from avoiding scraping hard parts or your boots, the suspension reacts better to bumps in the road (bumps are up & down; the suspension moves at the angle of the bike), and the tires have a more symmetrical contact patch the more upright they are.
 

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PTRider, please help me understand this more. If the bike is canted to the right and you need to pull the left grip to keep straight, it seems you have to pull even more to turn left? Why does pushing the left instead of pulling make the bike turn left? This is intriguing and can't wait to try your practice method. Thanks for these tips.
 

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What a great thread! I too had the same question as the previous poster when I first got my bike. I'm a new rider and took a California Safety Class. They told me the same thing about "pushing on the left bar when entering a left turn". That seemed totally wrong to me and I was afraid to do it. Now after riding for awhile, I find myself doing it just by nature. I'm not really pushing, but rather leaning on the left grip. It works! I've been surfing for over 40 years and it's funny that the general principle of leaning into the turn is similar. Much more fluid entry and exit into and out of turns. I find myself with the same rush when making fluid turns, even though the sports are not related.

Thanks for the tips!
Craig
 

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I do this in the turns and it is natural with cornering but logically it makes no sense to me in the realm of physics. Totally different on a bike than in a car. Wish I could explain it though.
 

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I used to scrape pegs quite a bit (thought it was great!) and yet I knew I wasn't going that fast, because some others I rode with were not leaning their bikes over as much and yet going faster through turns. Once I learned how and started to practice setting up for my turns, while maintaining better form through the turns, I stopped scraping my pegs completely. Now I am much faster and way smoother, in addition to being much safer as my bike is more upright and I am in greater control of the motorcycle than I was previously, especially when unexpected events or road hazards pop up. When riding on very tight, twisty roads, ensure that the balls of your feet are on the pegs. This will allow you to smoothly shift from side to side as you leave one turn and begin your set up for the next. I also found that tank grip pads helped my outside knee grip better while leaning, because the textile pants are can be quite slippery. Smoothness is key.

A few books that cover this info well are Total Control by Lee Parks, Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatsch and Twist of the Wrist by Keith Code. For me, taking a course on cornering was a great way to get some personalized feedback and the few hundred dollars spent there helped me get much more out of my street riding. Some courses can also have photo or video feedback, so you can do an exercise and immediately see where you need to make adjustments to your form. There were all kinds of bikes there - from big touring Harleys to Stroms and Sportbikes.

edit: after I took these courses, I went out and bought some practice cones. Or use tennis balls cut in half or something else that you won't wipe on if you run over it. Set them up as a 100ft circle or 2x 50ft circles as a figure 8 turn. This way you can practice the transitioning from right to left and vice versa. The MSF cones are really nice and small, but I didn't find them until after I had already bought 100 of the slightly larger disc cones from ebay for about $50. Do this with a buddy and one of you can take photo's or video and then use it to see your areas for improvement.
 

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Depending on your weight, you may also consider rear suspension settings and even upgrading front springs to better accommodate your weight.

Many of the posts in this thread about body position and such are extremely important as well, but suspension plays a huge role.

When I upgraded my front springs, the lil extra ride height, coupled with the rear set-up, were all the difference for pegs dragging.
 

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EFS, details about counter steering can really get into the weeds.... The bike must lean to turn. You have to lean it to handle the centrifugal force during the turn. The easiest, quickest, most effective way to make the bike lean is to steer the tire contact point out from under the bike's center of gravity. So, to start a left turn, you push on the left grip. This steers the contact point to the right of the bike's CG, the bike leans to the left, the front tire drops over to the left, and the bike turns left. To turn left sharper, push the left grip harder. To straighten, pull back on the left grip. (Steering with one hand allows the other arm to relax and things seem to work very well this way...per Lee Parks excellent book, "Total Control").

Look for Keith Code's youtube video of his No B.S. Bike where he mounted a handlebar to the frame with controls, and he shows the ineffectiveness of trying to steer a motorcycle by shifting body weight and other techniques rather than counter steering.
 

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spectrum

just want to add, you won't need to 'hang off the seat' for every turn you encounter, only the higher-speed higher-lean corners that make motorcycling more fun

I recently have been scraping my left peg a few times entering turns too quickly, and this thread helped me realize that it is during the turn-in that leaning off the bike is most important (sometimes a bit scary/not advised when under hard braking)

K
 
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