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Discussion Starter #1
Good day fellow enthusiasts. :)

I would like to ask for a little help, identifying a part on my bike, please.

The bar that follows the chain from the motor to the rear wheel, has a mount for the chain guard.

When I bought the bike a couple of years ago, I noticed the distinct lack of a chain guard. I then noticed the mount for the guard was missing.

I'm under the assumption, that I would need to replace that bar, to get a new chain guard mount. I haven't seen any after market items that perform such a function.

What is the name of that bar? Or part number?

Thanks a lot folks. :) :nerd:
 

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Unless I'm mistaken that 'bar' is the swing arm. There is a short plastic piece that mounts on the forward portion near the front sprocket. It's a guide to protect the chain and swing arm.
There is no 'chain guard' as such other than the piece you have there to keep lube from being thrown onto the tire.
 

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That bar is the bikes swing arm. Not cheap nor a quick installation. I assume the picture is not your bike, as this one has a chain guard? I would make a bracket or two and drill/tap the swing arm to mount the brackets then chain guard before replacing a swing arm.
 

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That bar is the bikes swing arm. Not cheap nor a quick installation. I assume the picture is not your bike, as this one has a chain guard? I would make a bracket or two and drill/tap the swing arm to mount the brackets then chain guard before replacing a swing arm.
On a project bike I damaged the swingarm trying to replace the bearings. Fortunately, I found a used swingarm for only $85 shipped on ebay so not horribly expensive. I thought I had "totaled" my bike as swingarms are over $1000 from Suzuki. Nevertheless, you are correct, replacing the swingarm is not a simple R&R.

I wouldn't drill or tap the swingarm, that could compromise the integrity of the bar. It is a highly stressed member under load and I think it might crack or fail if holes are drilled in it. The mounts for the chain guard are welded on but the mystery is what happened to them on his bike. Weird.
 

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On my 650 the rear mounting point for the chain guard snapped of the swing arm.

I made a small alloy L shaped bracket, drilled & tapped the swing arm and added some epoxy as I tightened things down, it has been there for many many thousands of K's with a good chunk of that being dirt without a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wish I knew. It was like that when I bought it. There's no obvious signs that the bike has been dropped, other than this one odd bit of damage.

I wouldn't want to drill through it... I might be able to tap it tho... ;) It's aluminum, so you cant weld to it, as far as I know.... ;P
 

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Perhaps the bike threw a chain at one point or maybe the PO did a silly thing and got a rag caught up in the chain and ripped off the guard. Who knows?

I can't imagine why anyone would remove it by choice.
 

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On a project bike I damaged the swingarm trying to replace the bearings. Fortunately, I found a used swingarm for only $85 shipped on ebay so not horribly expensive. I thought I had "totaled" my bike as swingarms are over $1000 from Suzuki. Nevertheless, you are correct, replacing the swingarm is not a simple R&R.

I wouldn't drill or tap the swingarm, that could compromise the integrity of the bar. It is a highly stressed member under load and I think it might crack or fail if holes are drilled in it. The mounts for the chain guard are welded on but the mystery is what happened to them on his bike. Weird.
YUPYUP. The spot heat from drilling or welding can compromise the heat treatment done during manufacture and severely weaken the swingarm
 

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Perhaps the bike threw a chain at one point or maybe the PO did a silly thing and got a rag caught up in the chain and ripped off the guard. Who knows?

I can't imagine why anyone would remove it by choice.
I don't have a center stand, so I remove mine when oiling the chain in order to get oil on nearly the whole run. On & off: two screws and an electric screwdriver. Boom.
 

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The black chain guard shown in your photo is held in place by screws to two threaded alloy tabs that are welded to the swingarm.

I also assume that the photo is not of your bike, as that bike has a chain guard.
Are the two threaded tabs still attached to your swingarm? The most likely reason for not having a chain guard is that one of those tabs broke off.

Can you post an image of your bike, the top of your swingarm, from the rear perspective?

In the attached parts drawing you can clearly see the two tabs on the swingarm that attach the chainguard (#17) by two screws (#18).
 

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My bike had no damage to cause the tab on the swing arm to break off it just gave way and I know of a few others that had the same problem.

I had no concerns about drilling the swing arm and would do it again in the same situation, you are actually drilling through a weld and the surface of 2 x 5m bolts is tinny.

My Grandmother worried less than some on this forum and she was famous for being a worrier.
 

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The rear chainguard mount of my bike also fractured away from the swingarm. It must be caused by the repeated stress as the swingarm pounds up and down on bumpy roads.

My first fix was Araldite 2 pack epoxy which did not hold. After some roughing up I am now trying JB Weld. After a second application, I am now waiting for it to age before refitting the chain guard.

Perhaps I should have just drilled and tapped a new bracket to the swingarm from the getgo. I guess that it can be attached so as not to interfere with the chain adjustment slider.
 

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Brockie if you spend some time walking through a bike wrecking yard you can see just how much punishment a swing arm can take, a couple of little holes is nothing.

I still believe one of the most dangerous things I will ever do is ride down the road at 100kph with a stranger coming at me also doing 100kph and we are divided by a line painted on the road and I do that without a second thought.
 

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I don't have a center stand, so I remove mine when oiling the chain in order to get oil on nearly the whole run. On & off: two screws and an electric screwdriver. Boom.
Please tell me you roll the bike forward a few more inches to get the rest of the chain. Then I won't think you are entirely cuckoo.

Seriously, though, you can probably pull the bike over on the side stand to lift the rear up and rotate the wheel by hand just a few inches further. That's what I do on my DRZ for the entire chain. A much lighter bike though. (My DL has a chain oiler.)

Just thought it might give the OP something to consider regarding the history of the bike and if it may have suffered some previously unknown damage. But it sounds like the 650 might be prone to this. Makes me glad I have a 1000, I suppose. That's one issue I haven't encountered.
 

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Probably no danger in drilling two small holes, but I would choose to wrap a clamp around the swing arm to hold a bracket, perhaps using the galvanized steel strips sold for exhaust repair. Wrap around, bolt in place, with a bit sticking up to bolt the chain guard onto. This also gives the option of adjusting the height of the chain guard, in case you need more clearance for a larger sprocket.
 

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Please tell me you roll the bike forward a few more inches to get the rest of the chain. Then I won't think you are entirely cuckoo.

Seriously, though, you can probably pull the bike over on the side stand to lift the rear up and rotate the wheel by hand just a few inches further. That's what I do on my DRZ for the entire chain. A much lighter bike though. (My DL has a chain oiler.)

Just thought it might give the OP something to consider regarding the history of the bike and if it may have suffered some previously unknown damage. But it sounds like the 650 might be prone to this. Makes me glad I have a 1000, I suppose. That's one issue I haven't encountered.
2017 Suzuki DL 650 ABS: 470lbs Black & Decker Li ion screw driver ~1.2lb.
I haven't been on a long enough ride with this bike to need to lube the chain en route(<700mi). And after nearly fifty years of riding, this is my first motorcycle without a centerstand. Your methods are more practical on a trip where I wouldn't be too concerned with leaving residue in a parking lot or campsite, and likely how I'll do it away from home. Typically I do maintenance & detailing in my garage, which has Race Deck brand flooring. I lay a rag under the chain while oiling to catch any oil dripping off, and I find it just simpler for me to zip the chainguard off and on with the power tool sitting on its charger 2-3 steps away for access to the top run rather than get back up, roll the bike forward, replace the rag get back down etc.
If you don't mind, do you have a Scottoiler on your 1000? What type of oil do you use, and how long does the onboard supply last?
You can send a private message if you like; I've strayed far enough off topic, I think.
 

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2017 Suzuki DL 650 ABS: 470lbs Black & Decker Li ion screw driver ~1.2lb.
I haven't been on a long enough ride with this bike to need to lube the chain en route(<700mi). And after nearly fifty years of riding, this is my first motorcycle without a centerstand. Your methods are more practical on a trip where I wouldn't be too concerned with leaving residue in a parking lot or campsite, and likely how I'll do it away from home. Typically I do maintenance & detailing in my garage, which has Race Deck brand flooring. I lay a rag under the chain while oiling to catch any oil dripping off, and I find it just simpler for me to zip the chainguard off and on with the power tool sitting on its charger 2-3 steps away for access to the top run rather than get back up, roll the bike forward, replace the rag get back down etc.
If you don't mind, do you have a Scottoiler on your 1000? What type of oil do you use, and how long does the onboard supply last?
You can send a private message if you like; I've strayed far enough off topic, I think.
I don't have a fancy-schmancy garage floor like you do. My shop is just an old converted barn.
I'm running a Tutoro. I use the Tutoro oil which seems to be lasting forever. The bike will be gone before the liter is used up.
I've never calculated how often I top up. For sure I can go a few thousand kilometers. It's a tidy set-up, minimal fling, far cleaner than the Motul I used to use on it. There's a couple threads around here on that topic.
 

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You don't need a centre stand you just need a bit of pipe.

Google trail stand and you will get the idea.

Put the bike on the kick stand then pivot the rear of the bike up and to the left on the stand this will lift the rear of the bike & put most of the weight on the stand, you then put the pipe between the floor and the bobbin mounting point on the rear of the right side of the swing arm.

On my Wee I fitted my DIY trail stand permanently in case of a flat tire, I did post photos on here but it was a long time back.

I know some people were using cut down adjustable alloy walking sticks and would carry them in their tool rolls.
 
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