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How do you guys efficiently fill your space? I start filling my panniers and top box and everything becomes a mess. Then everything you need is on the bottom. I'm looking at smaller bags to organize cloths tools snacks and different camping items. One thing I have been looking at is this to give you an idea what I'm talking Magpul DAKA? Pouch Medium OD Green
I really would rather find something little less durable and cheaper though
 

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Lots of places sell little stuff bags--Amazon, Wal-mart, sierra Trading post, E-bay, etc, etc. I've even made them from old jeans legs.
 
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I've said it before, will say it again. Go to an outdoor/camping store and get a load of roll-top waterproof bags. Different sizes, different colors. A well-known brand over here is Ortlieb, but there are others as well.

Not only do they keep your stuff perfectly dry even if the top box or panniers don't, but it also helps a lot in keeping your gear sorted. The orange one contains my sleeping bag, the blue one my clean clothes, and the grey one my tent fly.

At the same time, get a few mesh bags too for the gear that doesn't need to be kept dry (stove & accessoires for instance).
 

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Ya I'm just looking to stay organized.

Pannier Dimensions: Denali: 47L - 20"H x 18"L x 7.5"W - Most volume without more width. For a comparison of our different panniers and their dimensions please click this link to our WIKI page.

According to happy trails I can fit bags 18 inches long and 7.5 wide
 

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I think Happy Trails has some bags designed just for the pannier, but they are expensive. I have a selection of stuff sacks, zippered canvas-type pencil pouches, and dry bags from Walmart and just picked up a couple compression bags from Amazon. I write on the bags to identify contents. One pannier (the left one) tends to hold the stuff I need less often (tools, cook gear).
 

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I have the OEM side cases. The large one (left side) keeps my rain gear, extra gloves, and jacket liners. Each one is rolled up and placed on the bottom of the case. This leaves enough room to put my jacket and gloves in case I stop somewhere and don't want to carry them around. The smaller case (right side) carries miscellaneous stuff. I use the bag that came with my helmet to store my GPS Case, GPS power cable, tire pressure gauge, waterproof cover for my work backpack, and a few other loose items. I keep a spare hat and sunglasses thrown in there. I also have some flat bungees just tossed in the case...I use them frequently to hold down my backpack, so there's no point stowing them away in some container.
 

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With a full set of OEM bags and a tank bag I am generally "over-luggaged" for around town stuff, but I hardly ever remove and leave any of the luggage at home. When I do it is normally the top case.

Next, with the exception of a small cooler that fits in the top case, the stuff stored in the right side bag and top case stay in the cases except when being used, and the tank bag and contents stay on the bike 99% of the time.

Details on storage -

- Tank bag - hat, gloves, glasses and cases, ear plugs, GPS when not on the mount. Cell phone when on the bike and riding.

- Left side - seasonal jacket, waterproof riding pants, sheepskin pad, and other items that may need to be accessed through a day on the road. Also, the tank bag can be stashed in the left side box when parked at a sketchy spot. When I'm on the road for an overnight trip my laptop bag and CPAP machine both fit nicely in the left side, and the riding pants get moved to the right side. Unless I'm parked at a motorcycling venue where theft worries are minimal, I normally take my jacket inside with me in the interest of security.

- Right side - tools and tire kit, 12v compressor, multi-meter, electrical stuff (fuses, tape, etc), Plexus windshield cleaner, chain lube, rags to support the several different mechanical chores, jumper cables, tie-downs and ratchet straps in case I have to be rescued by trailer, and my Helen Two-Wheels D-ring luggage tie downs. The tools are organized inside a roll kit for basic wrenches, but I carry a ratchet and some additional sockets (6-pt) and wrenches that are in a 12" open top tool bag with small side pockets. The chemicals are further organized in a small tall and narrow cardboard box to keep the cans from moving about. With all that in the side-case there is still 6" to 8" of vertical space available in the right side box that gets "infrequently used" clothing when on the road. (Side note: I need to weigh all that one day just to see how it all adds up).

- Top case - paperwork (registration, insurance, other), maps, manual, and a small cooler that will hold 8 typical 16 oz bottles of water, and that has a watertight pouch for road snacks or whatever. The paperwork and maps are further organized in a zipper pouch that I spotted at a truck stop. There is still some space available in the top case.

Finally, my guiding rules are heavier things towards the bottom of the cases, more frequently accessed stuff in the (1) tank bag, (2) top case, and (3) left side, and leave room to stash the tank bag and GPS out of sight if at all possible.
 
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When we go camping or on long trips we use Helen2wheels large box bags. Four different color straps so once everything is organized, the color coding makes individual packing and placement a breeze.
 

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The easy way for me is pannier liners. Dry bag type or just coated nylon, but a bag that fills the whole pannier space. There are a number of brands out there, usually for about $20-40 apiece.

These allow you to move your gear from bike to tent, or bike to motel room in one trip.

Inside the bag liner, use stuff sacks or zipper pouches for organization. You have triple weather proofing this way, eg: clothing in a stuff sack, inside the pannier liner, inside the pannier.


Pannier 1: Your toothbush, etc in a small kit bag; your misc. stuff (flashlight, extra batteries, insect repellent, etc) in another small bag; clothing bag; flip flops and hat--all these go in one liner bag. That's everything you need in the motel or tent and you can leave everything else on the bike (if the area feels secure to you).

Pannier 2: I keep tools, spare parts, chain lube etc, again in their own bag. I have my stove, fuel and food bag on this side also.

Dry bag: ( no top box for me) : across the back holds all camping set-up (no need to expose any of your other gear to rain while you set up. Sleeping bag in stuff sack, mat, tent, tent poles.

Tank bag/tank panniers: raingloves, buff, maps, 1 liter of H2O, snacks, sunscreen, etc.

Most people I've traveled with either gravitate to this type of system or eventually end up on the side of the road in the rain scattering gear left and right and muttering, "Where the %*#@ did I put my raingloves?":furious:

I start filling my panniers and top box and everything becomes a mess. Then everything you need is on the bottom. I'm looking at smaller bags to organize cloths tools snacks and different camping items.
A few week ago my wife and I were riding through Northern California for a while and a guy (on a BMW F650, if it matters) who packed like that pulled in. I watched from the second floor balcony as he pulled out his jeans and sneakers from one side, rummaged through his tools to find his shower kit, and dumped everything out of his top box for his tablet. He was back out 3 more times, removing sleeping bag, ground cloth, duct tape, flashlight etc, to find something else. Each time he struggled to fit everything back in. It was hot and it didn't look like he was having much fun, especially getting the sleeping bag back in -which was stuffed so hard in a compression sack that it really wouldn't conform at all to the space he had.

..............shu
 

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Last trip I went on was on a BMW RT. In the side cases I had raingear, tool kit, small tarp ... stuff that I didn't need to have for an overnight stay and the heavy stuff.
The top case had small stuff like ball cap, extra gloves, maps, electronics ... purposely left it mostly empty for a place to stow my helmet and gear to use when we stopped for a break during the day.

I used a Leader Dry bag stuffed with overnight stay gear.
Unstrap one bag and drag it into the room or tent.

A second bag housed the tent, sleeping bag and pad.

I packed a Tshirt, socks and shorts together is a single stuff sack.
Grab a sack and have a change of clothes.
One sack was stuffed with toiletries, one with jeans, one with shoes ...
Each stuff sack stood upright in the dry bag so no digging required.

Strapped the dry bags on the passenger seat for a nice backrest.

 

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I use helmet bags - they are flexible, drawstring and tuck into the odd shaped corners of the factory Wee luggage and lord knows I've got enough around

Tank bag takes camera's, pills, snacks, hat and various cables, Mii drink enhancers, TMPS tool, pocket knife multi-blade. Amazing what goes in those many little pockets on my Rapid Transit magnetic bag. TMPS goes in the little pocket towards the back where I can look down and see it. Passport in the plastic map pocket.



Topcase has a bottom layer of miscellaneous that is easy to see so don't often need to go rooting through it - chain lube and siphon in a ziplock, some microfibre clothes, sandals and cool weather layers...then the computers etc in a multi-pocket computer bag as I'm in and out with it every food stop and it does not bother the bottom layer. Effectively divides the top case into two layers.

Side bags get clothes and toiletries - kids diabetic stuff get one side bag and some spare water. If riding solo I have loads of space. When with the kid he only has a topcase plus needs a ton of light but take up space diabetic gear so clothes are minimal. One helmet bag holds all my clothes except the 501 jeans for a 3 week trip. Polyester is wonderful, dries quick, packs small.

Kid has a rack on top of his topcase that is great for drying things.
 

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Cheers Basketcase

on RON trips I try to put things over and over into the left, right or rear bag. I use Nelson Rigg Yellow Drybags and each goes into the hotel each night. I pack everything in zip lock bags of various sizes and put heaver stuff into the bottom. Usually I only open 1 bag in the hotel because it contains what I need. I am beginning a transition to Kappa cases and my first one, the top case, has a handy-dandy "liner, which is a nylon bag with handles and a shoulder strap. I idea is to take the liner into hotel and leave the case on the bike locked on. In the Air Force long ago I found the bag drag was by far the worst aspect of traveling. Paraphrasing Gen Maximus Decimus Meridus's "hold the line" speech to his cavalry: "If you find yourself walking through an airport with both your hands free, do not trouble yourself for you are in Elysium and you're already dead!"
 

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I'm not the best packer out there but one thing I find handy is this:
Anything I hope to never use on a trip but feel I should have with me, gets put into freezer size ziplock bags and then duct taped, flat, to the vertical inside of the panniers. (Gorilla Tape)
 
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