StromTrooper banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I'd like to put a set of 2 inch Rox pivoting risers on the 2012 Glee.

Other threads indicate there's likely not enough "top" brake line to do this on the 2012 ABS model without buying the +2 inch brake line extension kit from SV Racing.

I've seen the threads that indicate people are doing this without the extended brake line kit, and one fellow in particular said he had no problems at all, until someone else pointed out he had lowered the triple tree on the fork tubes (seen in a photo). The guy went "Oh yeah, duh, I put on a lowering link too".

So to my request for your opinion.

I think I can "get away" with the Rox installation without causing too much unwanted stress on that brake line if I lower the triple tree on the fork tubes slightly.

I'm thinking of dropping the triple tree 1/2 inch (0.5 in. ). No lowering link in the rear.

I realize I would be changing the steering geometry, making the steering trail slightly smaller, and changing rake, and so making the steering slightly more unstable. This on a motorcycle which, in previous year models, would suffer from wind buffet upset to where folks complained about it. Alot... But, to it's credit, the 2012 model has been garnering praise indicating it's not nearly as bad in this regard (praise says it's actually a pretty stable cycle).

So, what do you think? Hair-brained idea, or it has merit?

Basically, I'm attempting to be cheap, cause I dont want to buy the (large $) brake extension kit, yet I also dont want "just a straight-up riser" (yes, I know it's not really straight up).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I can say that it probably wont work. I put 1" straight risers on and did the 3/4" fork drop and at full lock the brake line is pulled as far as I am comfortable with. Its ok now but i wouldnt go any farther with it. As is, i pushed the bars a tiny bit forward to give a little extra slack. Let me know if you get it to work otherwise. It sounds like some cable rerouting can be done for some extra slack but i didnt try it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I can say that it probably wont work. I put 1" straight risers on and did the 3/4" fork drop and at full lock the brake line is pulled as far as I am comfortable with. Its ok now but i wouldnt go any farther with it. As is, i pushed the bars a tiny bit forward to give a little extra slack. Let me know if you get it to work otherwise. It sounds like some cable rerouting can be done for some extra slack but i didnt try it.
So, I think I "read-in" to your reply that you did not perform any cable re-routing? If that's true, then, in my opinion, you left quite a bit of brake line "on the table". I removed the top line from it's clips and freed-up at least an inch of line, without dropping the front fork tubes.

All I did was remove the brake line from the clips that keep it from moving and I obtained a bunch (well, at least an inch) of additional slack. I checked and re-checked the lock-to-lock performance in that state (with left turn being the worst case), and saw nothing that gave me pause about using that now available slack.

So, that's why the question is here. I'm thinking, right now, I've got ~3/4 inch, at minimum, of slack. Add the "extra" 1 inch from releasing the cables from their clips, drop the fork tubes 1/2 an inch, voila! 1/4 inch to spare as a WAG.

You've all probably already guessed I'm gonna try this. I am pondering the steering geometry change carefully, tho. What I read is that good, careful folks (like you :) drop the front end a bit (3/4 inch in your example), make no change to the "back end" via lowering link, and ride on with no problems (unless they show up in "coffin corner" cases, like from high speed wind buffet on a scored-for-rain road surface and catch unawares until too late)...

*That's* the scenario that really gives me pause to think this through. I'm cheap, but not that cheap! If I decide it's too dice, I'll either: buy the whole brake line kit, 2) buy the single brake line (which I have confirmed today that I can get) or 3) buy the lowering link for the rear.

Anyway, I'm grateful for your input. Thanks...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Why don't you try dropping the front first by varying degrees, to see if the handling meets your expectations? It's free and takes all of 10 minutes.

Before I purchased my lowering links, I played around quite a bit with the front height. At 15mm (0.6 inches) down, I decided that the front was a bit squirrely for me, so I raised it back up to 10mm (0.4 inches) and it was fine. In the end, I got 3/4" lowering links and then dropped the front to match and it has the same neutral handling as stock again.

Once you figure out the maximum drop you feel comfortable with, at least you'll have solidified that variable in the equation. I personally wouldn't go down 3/4" on the front only to make room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Agreed on only the lowering the front being a last resort. Based on all the reading here i dropped both front and rear 3/4" to keep the steering geometry intact.

Correct in that i also did not reroute any cables yet. It sounds like i might have to give that a try. I still dont feel like i have the bars in the "right" spot for me yet. I get some pain at the top of my shoulders/neck area after an hour plus ride. I would like to bring them an 1" closer and see how it feels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Perhaps I'm mis-reading what the OP is saying but "I think I can "get away" with the Rox installation without causing too much unwanted stress on that brake line if I lower the triple tree on the fork tubes slightly." seems to indicate he belives that lowering the triple tree, i.e. raising the fork tubes, would provide more front brake line slack.

From the brake line manifold the brake line runs to a bracket fixed to the right side of the steering head. Lowering the triple tree, raising the forks, would thus increase the line length required to reach the master cylinder; i.e. reduce available slack, not increase it.

From my observations I think this later post is on mark; "All I did was remove the brake line from the clips that keep it from moving and I obtained a bunch (well, at least an inch) of additional slack. I checked and re-checked the lock-to-lock performance in that state (with left turn being the worst case), and saw nothing that gave me pause about using that now available slack."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Perhaps I'm mis-reading what the OP is saying but "I think I can "get away" with the Rox installation without causing too much unwanted stress on that brake line if I lower the triple tree on the fork tubes slightly." seems to indicate he belives that lowering the triple tree, i.e. raising the fork tubes, would provide more front brake line slack.

From the brake line manifold the brake line runs to a bracket fixed to the right side of the steering head. Lowering the triple tree, raising the forks, would thus increase the line length required to reach the master cylinder; i.e. reduce available slack, not increase it.

From my observations I think this later post is on mark; "All I did was remove the brake line from the clips that keep it from moving and I obtained a bunch (well, at least an inch) of additional slack. I checked and re-checked the lock-to-lock performance in that state (with left turn being the worst case), and saw nothing that gave me pause about using that now available slack."
Doh! You're correct! OK, thanks... Well, I'm in for the penny now. I've got the Rox part on the way. Oh Boy, now what 'm I gonna do? Why, throw more money at it!

Thanks, you been helpful. Really, thanks...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Doh! You're correct! OK, thanks... Well, I'm in for the penny now. I've got the Rox part on the way. Oh Boy, now what 'm I gonna do? Why, throw more money at it!

Thanks, you been helpful. Really, thanks...
So, I bought the brake line from Galfer, OEM + 3 inch extension. I'll let you know how it goes when I have it (and the Rox parts) in hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Brake line is in-hand...

I sent email to Galfer:

"
Please confirm that D772-3 (Line-A only) is the "top line" for a:

2012 Suzuki DL650 V strom, with ABS
...at OEM length.

That is, +3" is +3 inch longer than OEM length (OEM + 3 inch).

One more detail that you should positively confirm: The 2007-2011
Suzuki DL650 with ABS is different, and likely a different part
number.

I'm ordering for the 2012 ABS model year, and it's different from
previous ABS model years.

It's a different length, and there may be one other difference: It has
a "manifold block" at one end of tis line. That is, they're not "banjo
bolts" at both ends, but only at one end.

What I'm ordering is essentially the same brake line you folks make
for one brake line of the SV Racing 3-line kit (for the 2012 Suzuki V
Strom ABS), but with one more inch to extend that "top line" further.
The one you make for them is "OEM + 2 inch", and I'm ordering "OEM + 3
inch".
...and they confirmed all this information for me, and then delivered it.

The extended brake line looks correct, and all parts appear to be there in the package.

About $60 delivered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Glafer extended brake line screw-up

Well....

I got to installing it yesterday, only to find that it was a darned good thing I ordered an extra inch (+3 in. instead of +2 in.), because Galfer screwed up my order.

They did not attach the correct plumbing for the bottom manifold part.

Instead, they gave me a 90 turn. It's easy to see their screw up from the picture:



I went round and round with them to insure I got what I wanted before I ordered it. They *knew* exactly what I wanted and the application.

But, they still messed up.

I'm gonna leave it in, as it a real PITA to work on.

If you go down this road, there are a couple more gotchas you'll encounter.

First is, the OEM manifold is threaded to screw into the mounting block you see in the picture. The Galfer part is not threaded, you'll need to supply mounting HW, they do not.

Second is, there is a very small brass gasket that fits into the manifold between the manifold and ABS plumbing pipe, and you insert it before you attach it to the ABS plumbing. It can easily get sideways while you're caty-wampus on the floor trying to mate the manifold to the ABS plumbing. Dont let it fall out, dont let it get sideways, and once you're sure youve pushed the manifold and plumbing together, you're committed until you've got them screwed together hand tight. Otherwise, it might go sideways inside if you relax.

Good luck, I never wanna do that again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Had same issue

For me the throttle cables were too tight with risers
Mine were too tight. I used Rox 2" pivoting and opted to order new Galfers from SVracing as the stress on the lines is just a bit too much.Throttle lines too tight more so than brakes. Was it doable? Sure, just not durable IMO. I did lower my bike and same with the forks too, and it still was tight. Brakes and throttle, I don't like them to be maybe it will work situations. Just my 2 cents.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top