StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was hoping someone can tell me if I just messed up my new 2019 V Strom. It was on it;s center stand and I started it. when i pushed it off I (somehow) pulled the throttle and it revved out big time! I am still breaking it in and it was cold as well. I have around 850 miles on it and going by the book as far as break-in. It only redlined for a secound, but like i said....It was cold and I am not supposed to take it over 7000 rpm's for another couple hundred miles.

Thanks for your comments..I am new at this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
My guess is that's not the first time your motor has been revved up high. They probably did that same thing testing it in the factory to make sure it was running right and ready to install in a frame.

I wouldn't worry about it, and I'm NOT a 'ride- it- like -you -stole -it' kinda guy.

.............shu
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,998 Posts
Shouldn't cause any problems. Sustained high rpm when new can be a problem, a short burst generally won't do any harm.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
895 Posts
I'd bet a scientist would have a hard time telling you did that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,231 Posts
it will be fine, Suzuki red lines them at the factory with 0 miles on them :) The break in isn't just about the engine, it's about giving the pads time to seat, tires scrub in, find anything missed in the initial setup, for you to get used to the bike etc. It's a way for Suzuki and the dealer to reduce liability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
I was hoping someone can tell me if I just messed up my new 2019 V Strom. It was on it;s center stand and I started it. when i pushed it off I (somehow) pulled the throttle and it revved out big time! I am still breaking it in and it was cold as well. I have around 850 miles on it and going by the book as far as break-in. It only redlined for a secound, but like i said....It was cold and I am not supposed to take it over 7000 rpm's for another couple hundred miles.

Thanks for your comments..I am new at this.
Totally trashed the motor. Better sell the bike to me for $50 salvage.
277288
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,363 Posts
Did the rev limiter work? Usually around 10.5k rpm's.

Yeah, that's what you did. Tested the ECU rev limiter. ;)

Just watched a vid yesterday about the rev limiter. He said to stay away from it. As long as it's not every ride you should be fine. Better than the old days when they didn't have ECU rev limiters. Boom!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,232 Posts
Breathe easy it's gonna be fine, now go ride it normally like you typically would and ignore the bogus break in procedure. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all your input! I feel a little better about it. I did not notice the rev limiter working, all I saw was the needle zoom past 10.000 for a split second. I guess I'm OK as long as it doesn't start smoking on me. 😁:poop:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,116 Posts
Quit worrying or better yet forget about the manufacturers break-in procedure. Its doing nothing. Just ride the bike like you normally would. There is no type of street riding that you have done or are going to do that will or has done anything to shorten or lengthen the life of the engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
If it couldn't handle a little variance in the break-in procedure it wold be a POS. It is not a POS. I kinda got after mine a little under 600 miles, but didn't sustain high RPMs and was careful to vary the RPMs. Don't sweat it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,363 Posts
Don't baby it either. Once it does hit the 1000 mile mark give it WOT once in a while. Seats the rings better. I'm kinda a vary the throttle all the time kinda guy. WOT after 50k miles keeps the carbon out of the combustion chamber too.

I still hit the rev limiter once a year or so too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,363 Posts
Shouldn't cause any problems. Sustained high rpm when new can be a problem, a short burst generally won't do any harm.
This is a good practice for speeding also. AMHIK :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
... keeps the carbon out of the combustion chamber...
Ordinary downshifting does this quite well, as it's the only time when you have high rpm combined with high intake vacuum, (throttle plates closed). This causes a rapid drop in combustion chamber temperature, which prevents the formation of carbon deposits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
I agree with the general consensus that the motor is fine. However, I thought I'd contribute an engineering explanation of what "break-in" actualy means so you can understand why the motor (probably) wasn't damaged by the rev to redline. There are two main elements to break-in; wearing or conforming mated, moving parts together and work hardening.

When a new motor is assembled many parts that are in physical contact with, such as bearing surfaces, cylinder wall and rings, etc. are not smoothly mated. Even though dimensionally within tolerance there are microscopic high points between the mating surface. These high points are a source of high friction and localized heating of the metals. This can cause damage to the crystaline structure of the metal surface leading to pitting, galling and other problems down the road. As the motor breaks-in these high spots are worn down and mate the surfaces together thus reducing friction. My guess is that 80% of that process is done by 200-300 miles.

The second element of break-in is work hardening of load bearing components. The con rods, crankshaft, bearing structures are under heavy loads at higher RPMs. The design and dimension of these components are based on the strength of the metal after being stressed in use. This process is probably 80% done by 2000-3000 miles but it explains the gradual break-in period. Work hardening takes time in service and as the metal strengthens over time it can then handle more stress (i.e. more RPMs) eventually reaching its design strength.

That said, I think the break-in recommendations are probably overly conservative for a variety of business and engineering reasons. With the high tolerances of modern metal manufacturing, the wear-in period is greatly reduced from 20 years ago but the 1000's of miles rule of thumb still persist like 3000mi oil changes.

On the other hand, the work-hardening period is a gradual process but is probably overly conservative to avoid warranty repairs. What causes a forged or cast part to fail under load is the inclusion of a flaw, a void or dislocation in the crystaline structure of the metal, that limits the stress it can take. However, modern casting and forging techniques have really good control over the source of these flaws so even this problem has been greatly reduced over the past 20 years. But the components in the 'Strom engine haven't been x-rayed and analyzed like a jet engine turbine blade to confirm there are no inclusions in the metal. What Suzuki is trying to avoid is breaking parts that have an inclusion that could have survived if the part was allowed to reached its max strength through work hardening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,116 Posts
Don't baby it either. Once it does hit the 1000 mile mark give it WOT once in a while. Seats the rings better. I'm kinda a vary the throttle all the time kinda guy. WOT after 50k miles keeps the carbon out of the combustion chamber too.

I still hit the rev limiter once a year or so too.
If the rings haven't seated between during bench testing at the factory and mile 1... miles 2 thru 999+ are not going to do anything.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top