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Discussion Starter #1
Hey yall,

The oil seal on my '14 1000 looks like it is chewed up and leaking.

I ordered the seal to replace it, so is there a method for pulling it out and inserting the new one without pushing it in too far?
 

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The seal can be damaged and pushed into the motor if you try to leave the pushrod in the slave cylinder when putting it back together.

The seal is very thick and would be hard to damage all the way through, first thing I would do is ensure it is pulled fully forward and it is clean.

The seal on mine was damaged by the previous owner, I can see the damage but it stopped leaking when I pulled it forward to where it should sit.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The seal can be damaged and pushed into the motor if you try to leave the pushrod in the slave cylinder when putting it back together.

The seal is very thick and would be hard to damage all the way through, first thing I would do is ensure it is pulled fully forward and it is clean.
My co
The seal on mine was damaged by the previous owner, I can see the damage but it stopped leaking when I pulled it forward to where it should sit.
Mine is very chewed up around the hole the push rod goes through and that's where it's leaking from unfortunately.

My concern is trying to pull that sucker out without damaging anything.
 

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Getting the retaining plate off will be the hardest part, a stiff bit of wire fashioned into a hook will get the old seal out, The seal is very thick so I'm surprised it could be damaged enough to cause a leak.
 

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Gotta keep yer rod clean ;)

Sticky chain lube goop collects dirt,gravel and road debris which could chew out a seal.
(another tick for "oily" chain lubes)

I find expanding circlip pliers are ideal for removing seals ;)
I use a suitably sized socket as a drift for pushing new seals in.
 

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The rod only has a very short throw and with a very thick seal I don't see the dirt being pushed in enough to damage the whole seal.

In another post I showed a cover I made for my push rod to keep the gunk off it.

Basically it is a week spring that I covered with some heat shrink and the rod goes through the spring.

The spring needs to be week so as not to push the seal into the motor.
 

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The seal interface between the rod and seal gets torn up from debris baked on the rod. The rod throw may not be far, but it's enough for debris to tear the seal interface and cause weeping.
 

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I had a problem with my clutch rod seal last fall, got it fixed under warranty. 1500 miles later another oil leak from the alternater cover, Fixed under my extended warranty. But what is interesting is that the mechanic found that my crankcase was not venting. The hose from my crankcase was connected to the wrong nipple on the air box. It seems that there are two nipples on this air box which is shared between models. One nipple is thru and the other is blind, to be opened and used on other models..The crankcase vent hose was installed on the wrong nipple causing pressure to build up in the crankcase. Time will tell if this is the cause of my oil leaks, but it makes sense and is worth checking.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just got done replacing the seal....what a PITA. I thought it would be easy once the sprocket and retainer were off, but the seal either kept pushing itself back out, or it would suck itself into the case. Finally when i thought I had it, the pressure of the retainer plate against it pushed it back in.

I finally think I got it in there and I hope it actually seals. I haven't started the bike in hopes the silicone cures. I don't understand why they designed it this way with nothing for the seal to lock into or bite into.
 

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Just got done replacing the seal....what a PITA. I thought it would be easy once the sprocket and retainer were off, but the seal either kept pushing itself back out, or it would suck itself into the case. Finally when i thought I had it, the pressure of the retainer plate against it pushed it back in.

I finally think I got it in there and I hope it actually seals. I haven't started the bike in hopes the silicone cures. I don't understand why they designed it this way with nothing for the seal to lock into or bite into.
Most work on a motorcycle is a PITA for me, even things that seem like they should be simple, so I understand. I do have some questions if you don't mind, as I couldn't find the seal replacement in the factory service manual.

Why did you need to remove the sprocket?
What kind of retainer is on the seal, and with the retainer on, how could the seal be pushed out?
Did the original have silicone on it?

It does seem like a questionable design - seems it would be simple to at least have a lip for it to sit against so it doesn't go into the engine.
 

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The seal just pushes into the crankcase with nothing to stop it going all the way into the motor, there is a plate that bolts on the outside behind the sprocket to stop the seal from coming out.

There is no silicone on the original seal and the silicone he added would have worked like a lubricant until it dried, this would have been the cause of the seal moving around.

"When doing this work ensure you fit the push rod before you install the slave cylinder"

I cut a rubber washer a little larger than the seal and glued it to the outside of the seal after the retaining plate was installed, this has ensured my seal can't ever slip back into the motor.

I think I have a photo I could post if your interested.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Most work on a motorcycle is a PITA for me, even things that seem like they should be simple, so I understand. I do have some questions if you don't mind, as I couldn't find the seal replacement in the factory service manual.

Why did you need to remove the sprocket?
What kind of retainer is on the seal, and with the retainer on, how could the seal be pushed out?
Did the original have silicone on it?

It does seem like a questionable design - seems it would be simple to at least have a lip for it to sit against so it doesn't go into the engine.
The front sprocket must come off in order to remove the retention plate. This plate keeps both the sprocket seal and the push rod seal from coming out of the engine. Its simply just a metal plate with 2 holes in it for the drive shaft and push rod to pass through. It's held on by 2 apex bolts.

The original did not seem to have silicone, but following the guide that was posted earlier in this thread, it called for silicone. In hindsight, as Rolex said, it probably would have been easier.

So far after about 100 miles, I have no more oil leakage so I'm hoping the seal is now doing its job.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The seal just pushes into the crankcase with nothing to stop it going all the way into the motor, there is a plate that bolts on the outside behind the sprocket to stop the seal from coming out.

There is no silicone on the original seal and the silicone he added would have worked like a lubricant until it dried, this would have been the cause of the seal moving around.

"When doing this work ensure you fit the push rod before you install the slave cylinder"

I cut a rubber washer a little larger than the seal and glued it to the outside of the seal after the retaining plate was installed, this has ensured my seal can't ever slip back into the motor.

I think I have a photo I could post if your interested.
The rubber washer thing is a great idea. On my first sprocket change I may just do this!
 

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I cut a rubber washer a little larger than the seal and glued it to the outside of the seal after the retaining plate was installed, this has ensured my seal can't ever slip back into the motor.

I think I have a photo I could post if your interested.
What adhesive did you use? It would have to be pretty super-duper stuff to get a bond that wouldn't just peel away.
 

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I used a contact adhesive, apply to both surfaces and alow it to dry before putting the surfaces together.

The washer is a added feature just to help the seal do it's job and stay in place so I did not want a heavy duty glue just one that could be pulled apart again if required.

I used a hole punch to make the washer so it works like a second seal and the spring loaded rod cove keeps things in good order down there, I also run without the plastic sprocket cover so I can easily see.
 

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I'm thinking of installing something like one of these over the pushrod instead of a piece of rubber tubing. This should give it complete protection from gunk.
View attachment 169434
That looks like a good solution as long as they are narrow enough to avoid the sprocket and long enough to completely cover the rod. What are those accordion things called and where do you find them?
 
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