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Discussion Starter #1
Until I purchased my 'Strom, my other bikes all had dry clutches...BMWs and Guzzis, so auto oils were just fine.
I'm taking the advice in the article from Motorcycle Consumer News that says motorcycle specific oils are uneccssary and using standard auto oils are fine. I plan to use Valvoline semi-synthetic 10-40 every 2,500 miles.
My mechanic doesn't like the idea, but he wants me to buy this stuff at $11 a quart!!!

Don't mean to start a war; I would just like to hear what you guys are using and if my choice is okay.

btw, I did the first change @600 miles and used straight Valvoline 10-40 conventional for the break-in time. So far, the bike seems fine. :D
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I'll use Mobil 1 automotive, probably 5w-30.[/quote]

Wow! A 5W-30? You don't think that's too thin?
 
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Discussion Starter #4
I don't want to start a giant debate but here is what I know.

Mobile 1 auto oil has friction modifiers in it to conserve fuel which MAY cause your clutch to slip [no I don't want to argue about this <G>].

The only Mobile 1 for autos which is OK to use is the 15W50. Have used it for 300 k miles in a variety of bikes.

I don't buy any bike specific oil because I think it's a rip off [no I don't want to debate ].

Bobb
 
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Discussion Starter #5
none of the oils designed for a car engine are really supposed to be used in a transmission or clutch.the car never subjects the oil to the stresses present in a motorcycle engine or the rpm range of most motorcycles.before this does start a war,or some people's wisecracks about other's religion,look at it this way.pennzoil-breaks down at approximately 1,000 psi;motorcycle specific mineral-based oil breaks down at approximately 2,700 psi;golden spectro 4 semi-synthetic blend breaks down at approximately 10,200 psi.most of the motorcycle specific oils are made by the same companies and packaged for the big four as branded.many of the blends are similar in their durability ratings but you will find that one may shift a little better in your bike than others.what your local shop carries or suggests or even where the stuff is made can have a little to do with this choice as well.redline and spectro from usa,motul from france,and on and on.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
none of the oils designed for a car engine are really supposed to be used in a transmission or clutch.the car never subjects the oil to the stresses present in a motorcycle engine or the rpm range of most motorcycles
.........................
Then why did Mobile 1 auto and plain old Castorl GTX score better than the motorcycle specific oils when tested ?

Bobb
 
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Discussion Starter #7
uh oh.


All's I'm gonna say is that I've been using "Car" oils in every bike I've ever owned since I was 8 - all wet clutch bikes - and have never had a slipping clutch or an early failure.

I have heard, though, that you want to stay away from the ones with additives specifically for reducing friction because they could cause slippage...never tried or experienced it myself, just hearsay.

My strom gets Castrol GTX 10w 40, it shifts funny on anything else.

As Gump would say, that's all I have to say about that.

:D
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Desert Dave, you are an evil man. :evil: :twisted: :shock: :eek: :lol:
But to get back to the topic, you should be fine as long as you're careful not to get into a situation where you exceed 1000psi. Wouldn't want those "long-chain polymers" in your Valvoline to suddenly "shear".....
 
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Discussion Starter #9
We use Torco 4 Stroke and have for 30 years in all our bikes racer's or street . We have never had a oil related problem with these products. Pete
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, guys. I really appreciate you entertaining a most dreadful question. :wink:
 

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Nothing but Castrol GTX for my bikes. Have GS500 with 15,000+ miles and runs like a top. Had other bikes and always used car oil and never had a problem. In the US we have too many choices. People in poorer countries consider Castrol the cream of the crop and get it if they can afford it.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Motorcycle oils are marketed like diet pills on the Discovery Channel where marketing hype universally overrides common sense. Trust your common sense and ignore the hype.

Plain and simple: There is no miracle product that's a substitute for frequent oil AND filter changes. I was told a few years ago by a veteran racing mechanic that it was far more likely for an oil filter to experience pressure-related failure and cause engine damage than it was for an appropriately SAE rated motorcyle oil to suffer viscosity breakdown in any water-cooled street bike. With all the heated discourse on this and other boards over oil, you almost never see the same heated discussion over oil filters. Why is that? Manufacturer sales hype, that's why!

Synthetics are a good choice for air cooled engines, racing engines subjected to extreme use and for those occasions when you know you're going to go a LONG way between oil changes. If you have a water-cooled bike you don't race and you change your oil every 2000-3000 miles, synthetic and designer-brand oils may provide more "psychological" than tangible benefit. But, if it makes you feel better, then where's the harm?

I personally use Suzuki's 10W-40 motorcyle oil though likely any brand of appropriately SAE rated motor oil will work the same. Some bikes may shift better when using one brand of oil compared to another. Find one that works for the bike you have and run with it. My dealer sells the Suzuki-brand oil for less than $2.70 per qt. It doesn't have any friction modifiers in it and it's shockingly cheap compared to designer brands. I replace oil and filter every 2000-2500 miles without exception. I've had a dozen bikes in 35 years of riding and all are still running including the 1969 Honda Trail 175.

I use Suzuki oil filters. They're expensive at $12 each but are absurdly overbuilt to avoid pressure-related failure, unlike the cardboard-stuffed garbage sold by Fram and others. Filters by Amsoil, Napa Gold and K&N have also tested well in independent studies if you prefer to use those brands.

Cost of Suzuki oil/oil filter change, $21 plus tax.

Synthetics and designer brand oils bring it to $36 and higher.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Yeah, I always use the OEM oil filters and oil on my bikes. Well, not always the oil, but definitely the filters.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
figured that i would add my 2 cents worth. My other bike is a Kaw Vulcan 500, and i have been running Casterol GTX 10-40 in it. It has had a problem with the clutch when first started, where you would shift to first, and the tranny would clunk and the engine would die. I would do this even if you let the engine warm up for a bit. I got the idea that maybe it was the oil, since it did not do this when i first bought the bike. I changed the oil, putting in the same Suzuki 10-40 that i am using in my V-Strom. Guess what? The problem is gone! I paid $2.65 a quart for the oil, so you can guess what i will be running in both bikes from now on. For 1 buck a quart savings, I see no reason to run the automotive oil. Like I said, my 2 worth!
 
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Discussion Starter #15
eej63 said:
I changed the oil, putting in the same Suzuki 10-40 that i am using in my V-Strom. Guess what? The problem is gone! I paid $2.65 a quart for the oil, so you can guess what i will be running in both bikes from now on. For 1 buck a quart savings, I see no reason to run the automotive oil. Like I said, my 2 worth!
My thoughts exactly. Suzuki's 10W-40 oil, at $2.65 a quart, is an outrageous steal and performs beautifully. Of course, if prettier packaging and a multi-million dollar ad campaign bolsters your consumer confidence, I strongly encourage you to do what works best for you.

Just don't make the mistake of getting cheap with the oil filter in an attempt to offset the higher cost of the designer oil. That's just plain stupid.
 

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Bob Todd

Bobb_Todd said:
I don't want to start a giant debate but here is what I know.

Mobile 1 auto oil has friction modifiers in it to conserve fuel which MAY cause your clutch to slip [no I don't want to argue about this <G>].

The only Mobile 1 for autos which is OK to use is the 15W50. Have used it for 300 k miles in a variety of bikes.

I don't buy any bike specific oil because I think it's a rip off [no I don't want to debate ].

Bobb
Bob Todd,

Do you run the Mobile I 15W50 year-round? If so, does it start up OK in the winter (like at 20 degrees F)?
 
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Discussion Starter #17
Most of the time when the temp drops below freezing, it starts to snow here so I don't do a lot of riding in cold weather.

I wouldn't worry about having the 15W50 in, I'd just let it warm up a littel longer.

If I knew I was going to be doing big mileage in colder weather [like when I ride down from Ontario for Bike Week in March] then I would put in Rotella Synthetic as it has a 0W40 range.
 

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I agree with BT - especially if your bike is garage kept you can start up and use 15W50 all year around. Your engine operating temps and therefore oil temps don't change too much summer to winter, sure they change a little but not enough to affect the way a 15W50 would perform vs. a 10W40 once the engine is warmed up. I used the 15W50 Mobil1 redcap in the past, I liked it too. Had no issues with it on either of the Hayabusas or my GSXRs.
 
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