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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought my first Suzuki in 1979. I learned about their stupid proprietary oil filter about a week later, at my first oil change. I've been deeply annoyed at this ever since.

For the record, I'll be talking about a product in this post. I designed the product, however it won't be me making or selling the product, nor will I make any money when they are sold. My reward for my design efforts is that I got several prototype parts for free; that's the beginning and end of my involvement with this product. After all, it's apparently illegal at this site to publicize one's own product.

I now have an adapter on my VStrom that lets me use industry standard Honda type filters, like the Pure One PL14610 or the Supertech ST7317 (shown). These filters, as noted in my filter xref page, have synthetic media and are about 8 times more efficient at cleaning your oil than normal filters, like the Suzuki OEM. They also happen to cost less, but my purpose here is cleaner oil, not saving $8 per oil change. It also means I now only stock one oil filter for all my bikes - VStrom, ST1300, Superhawk, Ninja650. This adapter will fit any Suzuki 4-stroke engine, including motorcycles, marine outboards and quads.



I expect this product to be available to the public by Nov.1, 2010, for under $20. The guy making them is still working on his web site, he's not quite ready to take orders. But they're on his VStrom and mine.

Sorry about the dirty bike. My VStrom is now ridden by my 20 y/o son and has 74,000 miles on it. Like most teenagers, cleanliness is not among his outstanding qualities.
 

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Well, I'm impressed. But I'm easy.
 

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What is wrong with the Suzuki filter? It is a standard filter used on many different 4 stroke engines and is a widely available size from virtually any auto accessory store.

If you are going to make statements about how crap things are I for one would like to see your reasoning so I can understand your argument.
 

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If you are going to make statements about how crap things are I for one would like to see your reasoning so I can understand your argument.
Second that. Moreover, I've been using the Purolator M16818 for 35k miles or so with no special adapter I'm aware of, is that not an industry standard filter?
 

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As far as I can tell, the science behind the Cal-Sci web pages is sound. The filters available to fit V-Stroms are not as good as those recommended at CS. The Purolator filters that do fit our bikes is a lower quality than the Pure-One. I'd like to see an adapter available.

That being said, it wasn't clear that the touting of the adapter was not an ad until this thread. It is very clear that downloads of Suzuki manuals are copyright violations.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Standard filters are about 85% efficient at 35 microns, about 1.4 thousandths of an inch. That means that they pass 15% of 1.4 thousandths diameter particles. Since the basic machining tolerance of your engine is 1 thousandth inch, that means particles are passed which can stick in bearings and cylinder walls and gouge both sides. Synthetic media filters are about 85% efficient at 12-15 microns, depending on brand, and 99.5% - 99.8% at 35 microns - they pass 30-75 times fewer particles at 1 thousandth of an inch. The ML filter series at Purolator is made in China and rebranded, it's cheap crap. The PL filter series at purolator is made in the US and is the best oil filter made regardless of cost. The ST filters are made on the Champion line, the same line that makes the new synthetic filters for Harley and the Mobil-1 filters, and is comparible to the PL filters from Purolator.
 

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Many filter options for this bike, and none yet that I know of has caused any ill effects.
 

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Many filter options for this bike, and none yet that I know of has caused any ill effects.
My thoughts exactly. V-Strom forums as far as I'm aware aren't flooded with people complaining about engine lubrication issues so I can only assume that the standard filter whilst maybe not theoretically the best available is certainly in practice more than suitable for the intended use.
 

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I've had a new oil filter tit made at work to do just this. No issues with the Suzuki filters, but now all my Honda's and the Subaru share the same Purolator Pure Ones I prefer to use.:yesnod:
 

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The ST filters are made on the Champion line, the same line that makes the new synthetic filters for Harley and the Mobil-1 filters, and is comparable to the PL filters from Purolator.
Champion Laboratories makes several different quality levels of filters...at least they make several different price levels. Most filter makers do the same, and some are clear that the quality are not the same and quality pretty well follows the price. For example, a Clarcor engineer told me that their Baldwin and Hastings brand filters are top quality and their Casite brand and private label filters are not equal quality. I would never assume that the super-cheapo Wal*Mart SuperTech filters are the same quality as Purolator Pure One filters regardless who makes them. I would not assume that ChampLabs cheap Warner and ST filters are the equal of even their Mobil1, K&N (auto oil filters), and Royal Purple branded oil filters. (K&N makes their own air filters. Champ Labs makes K&N auto oil filters. HiFloFiltro makes K&N motorcycle oil filters.)
Champion Laboratories Inc.

Do you have an authoritative source for the information that synthetic filter media is always better filtration than paper media? I know that it can be better, but is it always better?

Will the adapter accept filters with the wrong internal bypass valve setting? Or the wrong pressure and flow characteristics? (The internal bypass valve in an oil filter is very important to bypass cold, heavy, thick oil so it doesn't rip the filter media and cause the pieces of filter paper and crud to enter the engine. Hot, thin oil filters; cold thick oil can't be filtered in the same filter.)
 

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Many filter options for this bike, and none yet that I know of has caused any ill effects.
Hard to prove a negative, but the difference between synthetic filter media and standard paper is well known. Synthetics are far superior. That's not the only factor in oil filter design, but it does differentiate the best from the also-ran.

This article which compares the guts of various automotive filters has been online since 2000.

Probably the most important value here is the element surface area. This helps determine the amount of filter media that is available to trap particles. Cellulose media (basically paper) can trap fewer particles and can flow less oil per square inch because there are fewer passages through it. Synthetic media has more passages and can trap more particles and flow more oil than cellulose per square inch. For the same type of media, the smaller the area, the sooner the filter will become plugged and will end up bypassing much of the oil instead of filtering it. Some filters use a cellulose/synthetic blend, so a direct comparison is not possible. More pleats in the element does not necessarily mean more surface area (as you will soon see). In fact, too many pleats can end up restricting the flow too much because there is not enough space between them to allow oil to flow. Most of the cheaper filters use a mix that is mostly cellulose. Some of the better filters use synthetics or synthetic blends.
 

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I had a Honda CB350 that didn't even have an oil filter. That doesn't mean I would not prefer a good filter.
 

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The OP has like 2 posts... edit now 4 posts... This can/will get old
quick and become just like any other oil thread.

I'm a maintenance supervisor for a fleet of helicopters worth several hundred million.
I'm using (like several other strom owners where I work) the 10 buck filters in our 6 grand vstroms. Go figure...:confused:

It's too easy to make the public paranoid and think they need extra stuff and get them to spend their money on your best product.


Having said that, if one has an opportunity to use the same filter on several different vehicles by adding an adapter, that would certainly be a nice convenience. :headbang:

Ken
 

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Knize, in his article, said, "Probably the most important value here is the element surface area." And he said, "Synthetic media has more passages and can trap more particles and flow more oil than cellulose per square inch." So, which is it, total surface area or passages through the media that is more important? I suggest the latter. It isn't the media area that filters, it is the number of holes of the correct diameter.

In any case, what's the problem we're addressing? Our engines do not put out a lot of particles. It isn't like a diesel engine with EGR and oil like black snot up to 10% soot. Nor is it like fuel filters in a dirty fuel system with rusty tanks. Has anyone ever determined that our oil filters become clogged and go into bypass even with hot oil? I don't think so. I run my Tundra's 4.7 liter engine 10,000 miles with an oil filter about the size of the one on the 0.650 liter Strom, and the testing lab tells me that after 10k the oil and filter are good for continued service...test again after 2000 more miles. I'll send a Strom oil sample to the lab after the next 5000 mile run and see what they say. The lab will know if the filter isn't doing a good job.

Yes, I'd like an adapter for various oil filters. However, the filters must have the correct filtration, internal bypass valve setting, and any other parameters set by Suzuki's engine designers.
 

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The OP has like 2 posts... edit now 4 posts... This can/will get old quick and become just like any other oil thread.
//
The OP is also a research physicist with several hundred thousand miles of motorcycling experience. He's also created one of the most extensive motorcycle information sites on the internet.

I fail to see how supervising maintenance on turbine-powered aircraft has any pertinence. Nor the post count.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The ST is made with Champion's good stuff. I know because I called them and asked. The Harley and Mobil-1 filters are too. The Bosch used to be, but then Bosch bought Purolator so the Bosch filter is now a Pure-one alike, not a Mobil-1 alike.

Bypass valve settings are set for the filter media resistence, the value has nothing to do with the engine. A filter should have a pressure drop of a couple PSI out of the engine's total 30PSI to 80PSI. If the pressure drop across the media gets over a couple PSI, that's an indication that there's a problem with flow through the filter media and the bypass must be activated. The engine has no idea if the filter is dropping 1 PSI or 15 PSI, that's only easy to measure inside the filter. A lot of people get all excited about precise bypass numbers; I don't. The good filter manufacturers know how much pressure drop their media can take before it starts to come apart, and set their bypasses accordingly. Hi-Flo is not such a manufacturer, I know of several cases where their filter has stopped up and the bypass has not activated, cutting off all oil flow to the engine.

Vehicle use has a lot to do with oil and filter choices. A vehicle like a taxi that's started once a day and run for lots of miles does very few startup cycles per 1000 miles, and is going to last a lot longer than a vehicle that's used only for a 2 mile commute to/from work, which gets apparently started 500 times per 1000 miles and never completely warms up. A vehicle used in dusty conditions is going to need oil and filter changes a lot more often than a vehicle that only ever runs on interstates. If you use a K&N air filter you should change your oil filter more often, as the K&N lets a lot of silicon through.

A couple times a year I get emails from guys who have 200,000 miles on their ford truck or goldwing or something and have never changed the oil or filter. Never. They just top off from time to time. There is nothing scary about running OEM filters and cheap oil. A lot of people do it, most I suppose, and engine failures are rare. But it's not the best you can do for your bike. If you intend to own your bike for a year or two and run it for 8000 miles, perhaps you nver need change the oil or filter. If you intend to keep your bike for 20 years and 100,000+ miles, I think you should definitely do a lot more maintenance.

Some bikes are particularly hard on their oil - e.g. a 4-stroke dirt bike these days holds less than a quart of oil, there will be a rapid buildup of silicon in the oil due to running in the dirt, and the engine spends most of its time over 6000 rpm. That oil should be top quality and changed every 1000 miles or less, imo. VStroms hold under 3 quarts and many are taken off road from time to time, so imo they should have an excellent oil filter and good oil changed regularly. BMWs and Harleys don't run their oil through the transmission, perhaps it's ok to run the oil in those bikes for longer than most other bikes, all else equal. But if you want to never change your original break in oil or factory original filter, that's ok with me. Let us all know how that works out for you.
 
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