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I was performing my first oil/filter change on my DL1000 today when I ran into a snag. I decided to use my new torque wrench to tighten the the drain plug bolt to 16.5 lb/ft. The angle I was holding the wrench combined with my inexperience of the tool, I way overtightened it to the point it stripped and loosened up:mad:. There wasn't a crush washer attached when I removed the bolt, just a small washer that was the same diameter as the bolt. Thin pieces of metal were stuck into the threads, and when removed, it didn't make any difference.

I ordered a new drain plug bolt and crush washer from my Zuk dealer and hope I didn't do permanent damage to the threads inside the oil pan. Any advice/reassurance is appreciated.
 

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Yikes....that doesn't sound good, that is why I don't trust allot of torque wrenches.:rolleyes1: You may need a helicoil or self tapping oversize drain plug, I think this is another good option too..... http://www.timesert.com/
 

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The plug is steel and the case is aluminum. It's the case that gets stripped, not the plug. A helicoil or similar replacement is in your future. That was the crush washer you saw. It gets crushed to that size.
 

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I was performing my first oil/filter change on my DL1000 today when I ran into a snag. I decided to use my new torque wrench to tighten the the drain plug bolt to 16.5 lb/ft. The angle I was holding the wrench combined with my inexperience of the tool, I way overtightened it to the point it stripped and loosened up:mad:. There wasn't a crush washer attached when I removed the bolt, just a small washer that was the same diameter as the bolt. Thin pieces of metal were stuck into the threads, and when removed, it didn't make any difference.

I ordered a new drain plug bolt and crush washer from my Zuk dealer and hope I didn't do permanent damage to the threads inside the oil pan. Any advice/reassurance is appreciated.
I don't know what size torque wrench you used, but torque wrenches are most accurate in the 80% and higher of their range. The most accurate wrench to use for a 16.5 ft.lb.(198 inch lbs.)torque value is a 30-200 inch lb. wrench. They are usually a 1/4" drive. If you used a 1/2" drive torque wrench or a 3/8" drive that has a max torque rating of 100 ft. lbs., that's where you'll get into trouble.

Like Greywolf said, it's helicoil time.

Edit: You might want to put a little gob of wheel bearing grease on the end of the bit just before drilling through. Also use some on the tap. The little bits of aluminum will stick to the grease. Flush well with engine oil by pouring into the filler hole up top before inserting the drain plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't know what size torque wrench you used, but torque wrenches are most accurate in the 80% and higher of their range. The most accurate wrench to use for a 16.5 ft.lb.(198 inch lbs.)torque value is a 30-200 inch lb. wrench. They are usually a 1/4" drive. If you used a 1/2" drive torque wrench or a 3/8" drive that has a max torque rating of 100 ft. lbs., that's where you'll get into trouble.

Like Greywolf said, it's helicoil time.

Edit: You might want to put a little gob of wheel bearing grease on the end of the bit just before drilling through. Also use some on the tap. The little bits of aluminum will stick to the grease. Flush well with engine oil by pouring into the filler hole up top before inserting the drain plug.
It indeed was a 1/2" drive. I would have been better off with a short wrench and going by feel rather than placing my faith in that torque wrench. I'll do a search for "helicoil" and in the meantime pray the new bolt holds. Thanks for the advice.
 

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NAPA can fix you up with a kit
 

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It indeed was a 1/2" drive. I would have been better off with a short wrench and going by feel rather than placing my faith in that torque wrench. I'll do a search for "helicoil" and in the meantime pray the new bolt holds. Thanks for the advice.
You're welcome bikerdad, good luck. You'll be back in the saddle in no time. Here is a link to a good deal on a decent quality calibrated torque wrench for the smaller fasteners on the bike. I use this one for the brakes and triple clamp bolts, drain plug, cam journal holder bolts, or any fastener up to 16.5 ft. lbs. http://www.amazon.com/GearWrench-85...ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1208233611&sr=1-1
 

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I own 3 torque wrenches but I don't use torque wrenches on drain plugs. 1/2" drive on an oil drain plug that just needs to be snug is a disaster waiting to happen. I've seen so many of these threads about stripped oil plugs, but how many have we seen where the oil plug fell out while riding down the road? I can recall only one and that was from a dealership that probably never even tightened it down at all. Leave the torque wrench to fasteners that need it. My $.02
 

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I've heard of this way too many times. People think that they are doing the right thing and try to torque everything. I've found 1/4 tools and short wrenches to be very useful on MC's.

Good luck with the helicoil!!
 

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I'm not saying that an appropriately sized wrench and the good ol' calibrated arm is a bad way to go, but one assumes that the factory specifies a torque value for the oil drain plug for a reason. Personally I use a 0-200 in-lbs beam-type torque wrench when tightening my drain plug - then I know that it is neither under or over-torqued. I'm fine with using my finely calibrated arm for non-critical fasteners, but I consider the drain plug to be fairly critical - too easy to strip if overtorqued, and you really don't want it coming out unexpectedly.
 

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oli plug question

I've heard of this way too many times. People think that they are doing the right thing and try to torque everything. I've found 1/4 tools and short wrenches to be very useful on MC's.
:iagree: ............
 

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NAPA sells a series of drain plugs that are designed for people who do this, they are "self tapping" and scaled in size. Go there with yours, find the next size up, and use it. No need to helicoil.

I used a NAPA plug in a similar situation a few years ago and it is still working just fine. I safety wired it just in case.
 

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NAPA sells a series of drain plugs that are designed for people who do this, they are "self tapping" and scaled in size. Go there with yours, find the next size up, and use it. No need to helicoil.
I'm thinking it would be a good idea to ensure that it's the same thread pitch as the original drain plug?
 

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This looks like it would work

Yikes....that doesn't sound good, that is why I don't trust allot of torque wrenches.:rolleyes1: You may need a helicoil or self tapping oversize drain plug, I think this is another good option too..... http://www.timesert.com/
I looked at this thread and it looks like just what you need. Or you could use a self taping bolt, which I have used several times over the years of riding. They work good and are a cheap fix.

When I change oil I don't use a torque wrench on the drain plug, I tighten it by feel. Then after the oil is in I run it and check for leaks.

I don't know why, but for some reason it is a fault of all Americans to over tighten bolts. Be careful when tightening any bolts. I usually tighten and recheck after a run.

Good luck in whatever you do!
 

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When I change oil I don't use a torque wrench on the drain plug, I tighten it by feel. Then after the oil is in I run it and check for leaks.

I don't know why, but for some reason it is a fault of all Americans to over tighten bolts. Be careful when tightening any bolts. I usually tighten and recheck after a run.
That's why I use a torque wrench - a decent quality one with an appropriate range for the job. Then I know that it's neither too tight or loose.
I've never had a problem with a drain plug or oil filter that I've tightened properly leaking.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you for all the responses. I had never used a torque wrench untill I removed both wheels off my bike a few months ago. I picked up a pretty cheap one from harbor freight that was 1/2" drive. As I was about three turns too tight, I realized the mistake I had made. I always used to hand tighten everything in the past with no problems. I thought I was getting fancy when in reality I was using the wrong tool for the job.

The upside is I never would have bought the torque wrench and performed maintenance on the bike without the help from this forum. While I did run into a few snags with my wheel removal project, forum members helped to bail me out. The knowledge base of this forum was the leading factor in my bike purchase.

I ordered a new plug and washer from the dealer and will try that first before I head to Napa. Thanks again and I will report back when she can hold oil again.
 

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Timeserts are the best. You will never use a helicoil kit again if you use one of these. The hard part of this is going to be cleaning up the hole. You may have to lay the bike over or if you have a lift that has a removable area may work as well. Try things out on something else first you don't want to mess it up further.
 

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I don't know why, but for some reason it is a fault of all Americans to over tighten bolts.
Only the inept that do not know what a proper tool is or how to use it and from where to purchase. It is a fault of most on this forum to purchase cheap tools then whine, piss, and moan when they screw up their bike. Feel acquired after thousands of repetitions can be trusted but for the unknowing a proper tool properly used will prevent some of the foolish things posted on this forum.
 

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Only the inept that do not know what a proper tool is or how to use it and from where to purchase. It is a fault of most on this forum to purchase cheap tools then whine, piss, and moan when they screw up their bike. Feel acquired after thousands of repetitions can be trusted but for the unknowing a proper tool properly used will prevent some of the foolish things posted on this forum.
Certainly obtaining the correct tool is not outside the realm of possiblity for the home mechanic but spending hundreds or thousands of dollars to work on a couple of bikes is just not economically feasible in most cases. The learning process takes time - like you said, - education is not cheap and we often learn most from our mistakes - so they vent about it a little on the forum - maybe looking or hoping for help or insight from someone with more experience.....is that so wrong?
 
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