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What a strange thing to stuggle with...the oil drain plug gasket removal. Each time I do an oil change it's a nightmare to get the old drain bolt gasket off, it doesn't seem to have room to clear the threads. The first time it was so bad I went to an automotive garage and the two of us were able to remove it, but what a large pain it was. Just did another oil change and the same problem. I use the stock Suzuki crushable drain plug gasket and once it is used/crushed it's horrible to remove it. I have tried unscrewing it - didn't work, tried prying it off with a screwdriver - very difficult but works, there has to be a better way?

Does someone have a trick to removing this stock drain plug gasket?
 

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The first time I did mine I thought it was made together and not replaceable, and re-used it a few times. Never did leak but it offended my sensibilities to not replace it. I was able to get the washer off by gripping it with some large-jaw pliers (maybe vise-grips) and pulling up while turning the bolt. After that I have always used the after-market solid aluminum washers that don't deform like the Suzuki ones.
 

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Just use large handle needle nose pliers. The crush gaskets are aviation standards, and although pricey, can, over time, let one know if a Harley or other bike has been parked in that spot.
I was taught to never reuse a gasket or washer, and our shop floor is spotless.
 

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Just use large handle needle nose pliers. The crush gaskets are aviation standards, and although pricey, can, over time, let one know if a Harley or other bike has been parked in that spot.
I was taught to never reuse a gasket or washer, and our shop floor is spotless.
My garage floor is free of oil from the many various bikes I have owned over the years, and not a one of them had the original crush washer changed out on the oil drain plug. :wink2: I believe we all should do what makes us ultimately sleep well at night, but I sure see a lot of OCD tendencies and worrying over nothing on this forum as well "my opinion". I think the advice given on how to remove the washer is sound, but I personally wouldn't know. :grin2:
 

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I've spent more time thinking about that blasted crush washer than it's worth and have never been able to think of how (or why) a new crush washer, once crushed, is any different, (let alone better), than an already crushed washer reinstalled and brought to the same compressed state as it had when initially crushed. I figure there is still some spring in it, but even if not it is soft enough to get the sealing job done.

Mine was replaced at 600 miles because it was in the shop, but in the 10+ oil changes since, the same one goes back, still conveniently on the plug, because it looks fine. I've never had a hint of leakage from the plug.

Replacing gaskets, as a rule, is a good idea because they get damaged or shift. But my oil plug crush washer is as good as new, and it certainly does not shift. The surfaces between which it seals are so flat that I doubt the crushing effect matters. Any soft material would be fine there.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I would like to continue using these gaskets. But using a flat blade screwdriver and needle nose plyers seem primitive. Is there a special technique to remove them?
 

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I would like to continue using these gaskets. But using a flat blade screwdriver and needle nose plyers seem primitive. Is there a special technique to remove them?
Using a small pair of dykes would be a little less primitive, I suppose. Whether it's a special enough technique I cannot say. A cutting laser would be pretty special.

At this point, I have to ask: What is the objective here? What will be the measure of merit for the technique, to help decide whether it's good enough?
 

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Using a small pair of dykes would be a little less primitive, I suppose. Whether it's a special enough technique I cannot say. A cutting laser would be pretty special.

At this point, I have to ask: What is the objective here? What will be the measure of merit for the technique, to help decide whether it's good enough?
What can I say, how would a small pair of dykes help you. (Google dykes) :surprise: would be instructional to watch them working.
Seriously though why bother trying to replace the oil drain ring unless its leaking, on older bikes I have even made up cardboard gaskets which have lasted as long as an oil change.
Never had a leaking drain plug just don't overtighten it.
 

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What can I say, how would a small pair of dykes help you. (Google dykes) :surprise: would be instructional to watch them working.
Seriously though why bother trying to replace the oil drain ring unless its leaking, on older bikes I have even made up cardboard gaskets which have lasted as long as an oil change.
Never had a leaking drain plug just don't overtighten it.
Watching these Dykes/Cutters working might be more boring than you imagine. As for why to bother replacing that crush washer -- it's a way to pacify worry for those who have not learned to look past rules of thumb. I've worked with engineers who insist upon a rule-based approach to design, seemingly (to me) as a way of compensating for uncertainty regarding failure margins. I suspect that MC owners often hope that, by taking extra-good care of their steed, it will be significantly less likely to do something random, and bad. It almost seems unkind to try to take that away from them.
 

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Not to hijack a thread already well on the way, but I wonder if you actually used a torque wrench to tighten the plug if using a new washer vs the old washer would make a diff in the torque value. I have read lots of threads over the yrs on stripped oil drain plugs. Back on topic-I refuse to google dykes and will muse on the randomness theory.
 

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Go on Google away you know you want to.
Talking torques I never torque the oil drain plug. Just snug it up no need to overtighten.
 

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Not to hijack a thread already well on the way, but I wonder if you actually used a torque wrench to tighten the plug if using a new washer vs the old washer would make a diff in the torque value. I have read lots of threads over the yrs on stripped oil drain plugs. Back on topic-I refuse to google dykes and will muse on the randomness theory.
I use a torque wrench set to 16 ft-lb. The original washer is basically part of the bolt and paper thin. The only extra step I take is to wipe off any grime or grit that may have made its way onto the mating surfaces. I haven't ever stripped a thread on a bike.

I have no grudge against anyone who prefers to replace it with every oil change, but I don't think it's essential to do. If mine started leaking, I'd replace it. It just never has.
 

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In over 50 years of driving/riding, I don't think I've ever replaced a washer. I have annealed a couple and re-used them.
Lol...whatever works! But for the other 99.9% of us, easier just to grab a 20-cent washer from the bag in the tool box.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
This is the first motorcycle I have owned that used the crushable washer as a drain plug gasket. I believed that because it crushed when properly torqued it was providing a leak resistant seal.
 

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Back on topic-I refuse to google dykes and will muse on the randomness theory.
I just did, interesting results. According to Wikipedia the correct spelling would be "dikes" not "dykes" when referring to diagonal cutters. I have never seen it spelled properly I guess . . .
 
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