StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The earlier V-Stroms appear to have an oil cooler under the radiator as an Oil to Air heat exchanger.

Our 2012+ units have the oil cooler sandwiched between the oil filter and the block as a Oil to Water heat exchanger.
There are two coolant lines running to it.

Was this change made as a cooling improvement or a cost/weight cutting measure?
Would it be worthwhile to install an Oil to Air heat exchanger?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,249 Posts
The earlier V-Stroms appear to have an oil cooler under the radiator as an Oil to Air heat exchanger.

Our 2012+ units have the oil cooler sandwiched between the oil filter and the block as a Oil to Water heat exchanger.
There are two coolant lines running to it.

Was this change made as a cooling improvement or a cost/weight cutting measure?
Would it be worthwhile to install an Oil to Air heat exchanger?
I doubt it was purely a cost saving measure considering that a decade's worth of Stroms had the oil cooler mounted on the front of the engine and the relative cost of the part is probably negligible now.

I'm sure it was in part due to the extreme vulnerability of the previous generation's oil cooler, being exposed to debris coming off the front wheel and such.

This is just a more simple, more efficient setup.

I see no reason to install another oil cooler.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
877 Posts
It may have more to do with emissions requirements- the primary purpose may be to get the oil up to temperature faster. The new design may or may not be better at actually cooling the oil than before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It may have more to do with emissions requirements- the primary purpose may be to get the oil up to temperature faster. The new design may or may not be better at actually cooling the oil than before.
That's what I was thinking...
I've had cars with the Water fed oil coolers that were a mid-year change and I've always seen higher oil temps on them versus when I swap in an earlier year's Air/Oil cooler.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
865 Posts
I've a temp gauge that replaces the oil filler cap, so it doesn't give a real oil temp as it's not touching the oil, but it does get oil mist over it. I reckon that when I'm riding it's mainly third gear upwards, with a gear change of around 5000 ish rpm, then the oil temp will be about 60 to 70 degrees C with an OAT up to 30 deg C. Stop start / low gears / hill climbs saw the maximum up to 80 deg C and drops down quite quickly when back above 3rd gear etc. 10 deg C and 60mph roads equals about 40 deg C.

So unlikely to overheat the oil in "normal" use, and very likely to see oil emulsification if doing open roads in the winter, as the oil just doesn't get hot enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,029 Posts
Th enew setup is much more efficient than the old, much more compact - and probably important to Suzuki - cheaper.

But, main point is, it works better anyway.

Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
I agree, the newer oil cooling set up is better. It not only cools the oil but warms it up as well. With the new design you are not going to get the high spikes in oil temp and the oil temperatures will be more consistent and lower overall.

No doubt EPA stuff had something to do with this as well, as even Harley had to go to water cooling on their vtwins. I've read somewhere that the European EPA standards where getting stiffer in 2015.

The new DL650 gets better gas mileage ( according to the manufacture ) so that means it is running leaner or more efficient depending on your point of view. Therefore better overall cooling is required.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
I need to see a diagram of the oil system in the bikes. Is there a thermostatic valve anywhere to divert oil away from the old air-cooled or new water-cooled cooler when the oil is cold? At what point in the coolant system does the coolant go to the new oil cooler?

Normal engine oil temperature in the sump is above 200°F, maybe up to 220°, and a max of something like 250°F. Aftermarket thermostatic valves for add-on oil coolers usually begin to open at 180°F; I don't know about OEM valves. Sending the hot coolant to the oil cooler before that coolant goes to the radiator is one common way to do it--many large diesels are set up that way, and my Volvo turbo car engine had its oil cooler in the hot tank of the radiator along with a thermostatic valve to bypass the cooler until the oil was hot.

The early pics of the '14 DL1000 showed an air-cooled oil cooler. Later pics showed a water-cooled oil cooler.

Also keep in mind that the air passing over the outside of the engine and around the sump is a major source of oil cooling, as is heat transfer through the engine metal to the coolant. Cold weather riding will have much cooler oil, and very hot weather riding will have hotter oil. I like an xW-50 oil in our engines in very hot climates to help ensure good protection at the hottest points inside the engine.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,731 Posts
I need to see a diagram of the oil system in the bikes. Is there a thermostatic valve anywhere to divert oil away from the old air-cooled or new water-cooled cooler when the oil is cold? At what point in the coolant system does the coolant go to the new oil cooler?
...

Coolant heats up WAY faster than Oil. When the engine first starts heat will flow from the Coolant (as it warms up) to the Oil. When the oil is hotter than the coolant, heat will flow to the coolant. The Coolant has your typical Thermostat on it.. none is needed on the oil cooler.

This is WAY better than air based oil cooler. Faster warmup of hte oil, and much more efficient cooling of the oil when hot. Especially in slow moving or stopped situations.

..Tom
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
Here's the diagram.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
It looks like the thermostat box is too far left--it should be a 3-way valve directing coolant to the water pump and/or the radiator as the temperature dictates.

So the oil cooler gets the cold coolant from the outlet of the radiator. That is way too cold on a cool day. Is there a thermostatic bypass in the oil circuit?
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
Is there a thermostatic bypass in the oil circuit?
Not that I could find. When the thermostat is closed, I'm thinking the arrow over the W may be effectively reversed but at a reduced flow rate because water is not flowing from the radiator while the pump is still drawing water through the cooler due to the difference in hose sizes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
The way I interpret the diagram.

The water doesn't circulate through the system ( rad ) until the thermostat opens. In other words the water circulates around the heads until it gets to the preset limit somewhere around 180 F, when the thermostat will start to open, then goes through the rad and onto the oil cooler and back around again. From what I see it doesn't go around the oil cooler until the thermostat opens. Being that it is a continuous loop once it is up to temp then there is no need for any kind of thermostat in the oil circuit. Most oil coolers with a thermostat bypass the circulating oil until it reaches the 180 F ( or so ) temp. So the thermostat in the water acts the same way and there is no need for any thermostat in the oil system. That's a pretty standard circulation route in my view.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,249 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,042 Posts
So I guess the oil will be alright temp wise, until the coolant starts flowing thru it from the radiator?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,029 Posts
Exactly the same as it was with the air cooled oil cooler.

The difference is, that with the air-cooled version, on a really cold day, the oil would stay colder longer, and on hot days, liquid/liquid heat exchangers are MUCH more efficient than gas/liquid ones and it does a better job of keeping oil temps down.


Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
865 Posts
I've a temp gauge that replaces the oil filler cap, so it doesn't give a real oil temp as it's not touching the oil, but it does get oil mist over it. I reckon that when I'm riding it's mainly third gear upwards, with a gear change of around 5000 ish rpm, then the oil temp will be about 60 to 70 degrees C with an OAT up to 30 deg C. Stop start / low gears / hill climbs saw the maximum up to 80 deg C and drops down quite quickly when back above 3rd gear etc. 10 deg C and 60mph roads equals about 40 deg C.

So unlikely to overheat the oil in "normal" use, and very likely to see oil emulsification if doing open roads in the winter, as the oil just doesn't get hot enough.
For those who are getting milky / foaming / water in the oil, have a look at this, and then be not surprised when you see it when it's nearer to 30 degrees F, and you do short journeys and at normal motorway speeds. :yesnod:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
oil cooler on a 650 vstrom

have a question has any body put a oil cooler on a 2013 or newer 650 vstrom and has any body put a oil pressure gauge on your bike
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
The oil/coolant heat exchanger on the Glee does a better job than the oil/air heat exchanger on the Wee. There is no good reason to add one and it would keep the oil too cold in cold weather so that is one reason not to add one. I think one person put an oil pressure gauge on but I'm pretty sure I've seen zero reports of a main gallery oil pressure deficiency on any V-Strom. A blocked oil passage feeding an oil jet to a cam chain has happened but an oil pressure gauge would not catch that.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top