StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Have a Vstrom 650 ABS Adventure 650 and getting ready to start my own oil and fluid changes. I know how to change the oil. Is there any other oil type of changing to do, like gear box or anything like that? What about the coolant, how often? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
Coolant every 2 years.
Brake Fluid Flush every two years.

The Google custom search box located in this page will link you to all the information you will ever need to know about fluids for your bike.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,049 Posts
The gearbox and the engine are lubricated by the same oil. Check the coolant type your bike comes with. Some are long life types that last better than 2 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Coolant every 2 years.
Brake Fluid Flush every two years.

The Google custom search box located in this page will link you to all the information you will ever need to know about fluids for your bike.
The “SUZUKI SUPER LONG LIFE COOLANT” (Blue) is every 4 years and the “SUZUKI LONG LIFE COOLANT” (Green) or non-genuine super long life coolant says every 2 years.

I wonder what comes from the factory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
I'm pretty sure the rad fluid I drained out of my bike was blue and because I got my 2008 650 used (2nd owner) from a dealership I really didn't know for sure it's history with respect to coolant changes. I flushed the cooling system three times with distilled water and ended up using Toyota pink long life coolant. I told myself I'll change it in two years but if I get lazy or forgetful it gives me at least another two year grace period.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I'm pretty sure the rad fluid I drained out of my bike was blue and because I got my 2008 650 used (2nd owner) from a dealership I really didn't know for sure it's history with respect to coolant changes. I flushed the cooling system three times with distilled water and ended up using Toyota pink long life coolant. I told myself I'll change it in two years but if I get lazy or forgetful it gives me at least another two year grace period.
This is a good detail to take into consideration when changing coolants. If you're going to use a different coolant than what's currently in the system it's essential to flush the existing coolant out of the system well. Some coolants when mixed can result in undesirable chemical reactions. Most automotive systems I've flushed have taken about three fill/drain cycles (running up to operating temp each time) with straight distilled water to come out clean and ready for refill with new coolant. ALWAYS use distilled water to flush and to mix with concentrated coolants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
Coolants come in two base glycols, ethylene (alcohol based and poisonous) or Propylene (vegetable oil based and environmentally safer. actually you eat propylene glycol on the regular basis as its a food additive).

Color, texture or smell is no way to tell what base glycol/coolant you have only chemical analysis can do this. If you mix propylene and ethylene basesd glycol they can gel so that is why it is important not to mix unknown glycols/coolant together.

But you don't need to get expensive "motorcycle" coolant well because there really is no such thing as "motorcycle" coolant. Coolant is either a propylene or ethylene glycol base with water and an inhibitor to adjust the PH to a level that will not attack metals in the system. Typically aluminum is the most PH sensitive metal in the system. Since most radiators have lots of aluminum in them PH is adjusted to satisfy it. That is why you see "aluminum safe" on the label of 99% of coolants available at the store. Aluminum safe is nothing more a PH range. The second thing you need to look for is glycol that is silicate free. Silicate doesn't get along with the plastic impeller and seals on the water pump of motorcycle, automobile, tractors, lawnmowers, generators or any engine.

The good news is cheap old premix Prestone 50/50 is "aluminum safe" and "silicate free" and is all your motorcycle needs. At a whopping $8.88 a gallon it is cost effective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Ok stupid question time......
I have a late 2017 650XT, and it’s time for first oil change.
PROBLEM
I’m on an island province in Philippines.... nearest dealer a 1 hour plane ride or overnight ferry ride away, so I can’t just pop over and buy the parts I need.
I can oil locally no problem, but I’ll have to buy the filter on-line so I MYST be 100% certain!!!
But when I try to locate the filter type, all the suppliers catalogues seem to stop at 2016 models!!!!!

So, simple question.... is the K&N KN-138 Oil Filter correct to my 2017XT 650?
I can get these online easily!


Sent from my iPhone8
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,675 Posts
As long as youre ordering..you COULD just order from a Suzuki dealership parts department several of the oem Suzuki oil filters and drain plug gaskets.
Oil filter......16510-07J00
Drain plug crush washer...09168-12002
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,822 Posts
Do they even make coolant any more with silicates? Because of the number of vehicles out there with water pumps that could be damaged by silicates, it seems from my previous searches for coolants that all of them are silicate free now. That seems to be the industry standard. It would probably easier to know at this point which ones aren't silicate free, to be able to avoid them.

I've also read that, in addition to flushing the cooling system with distilled water, you should add white vinegar to the water, since the acetic acid acts as a mild solvent to help remove any deposits. Anyone else here do this when they flush the system?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,675 Posts
RC, back when most motorcycle engines were air-cooled and most car engines were cast iron rust and corrosion were the cause of clogged radiators, overheating, water pump failures, etc.
These days most car engines are aluminum, like the bikes. 5-year coolant change intervals are normal, and I rarely see cooling system issues with the cars, even less so with water-cooled motorcycles.
At the dealership we used a 2-part BG(Bearing& Gear Corp) cooling system flush package--a mild acid to remove scale, followed by a base neutralizer for that flushing agent. Without removing the acid, though mild, radiators and heater cores could develop leaks.
I'm not entirely convinced that such measures are necessary today. In most cases--including my own vehicles--what I drain out is just as clean as what I put in.
Most coolants today are designed for aluminum engines and are silicate-free. For myself, I use either Subaru Premium Pre-mixed coolant, or Mazda Extended-Life Pre-mix. No mixing necessary, no needing distilled water, quick, efficient, and less expensive. i change coolant at every major service, 7500 miles in my ZRX, will change it at 29000 miles/4 years using the Suzuki Super Long Life Coolant (Blue) in my DL1K when I get to that point. The Suzuki GREEN coolant is used is to be changed at 7500 mile/24 month intervals. Whichever comes 1st in both cases.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,867 Posts
So why the more frequent coolant changes on a motorcycle, compared to a car?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,822 Posts
I remember well those days, Maz4me. My first three cars were built prior to 1973, and I'm well acquainted with leaking radiators and failed water pumps. However, since the days when cast iron engine blocks dominated has faded into the past, most blocks are now aluminum, along with the common water pumps with plastic impellers. All of which require silicate free coolant, which now appears to be the standard. Calling them "silicate free" seems to be a holdover from the days when cast iron blocks and metal impellers were more dominant, but now I think that it would make more sense to identify the ones that DO have silicates, rather than the other way around. In fact, some of the brands I looked at don't specifically say "silicate free", they just say "safe for all engines". If you're a novice at maintenance, and you're looking for a coolant that specifically says "silicate free", you might get misdirected when you can't find that specific phrase.

I need to flush mine before a trip this summer, though it still looks fine. I'll probably just use the Zerex Asian, or whatever else is on sale at O'Reilly's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
As long as youre ordering..you COULD just order from a Suzuki dealership parts department several of the oem Suzuki oil filters and drain plug gaskets.

Oil filter......16510-07J00

Drain plug crush washer...09168-12002


If only it was that easy......
This is Philippines. They are simply just not set up for it. They have no online payment system. Even if they did shipping would cost a ridiculous amount, and it would take weeks or even months to arrive (if it wasn’t stolen en-route)!
Back to my original question......KN-138? I can get these. Just need to know if they are correct or not.


Sent from my iPhone8
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,675 Posts
LoLo, the '17 DL650 takes the same oil filter as the '16, so yes, the KN138 would be your replacement filter.
Located on the SuzukiPartsWarehouse online microfiche.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,675 Posts
RC, instead of "Silicate Free" many of the later coolants now reference "Long-Lasting Aluminum Protection" in their advertising and on their on-container description. My Mazda Tribute recommends a different coolant than my Miata, MPV, or the wife's Mazda5. But both reference aluminum protection, as does my Subaru coolant.

In some of the Mazda 626 and Millenia V6s, the aluminum of the block and heads were just fine...but the water pump impeller rusted away. In 929s and MPVs, the impeller loosened on the water pump shaft. Both resulted in severely overheated engines. those cases were the result of owners never changing their coolant in 75K miles or more than 5 years.

You can check with a coolant protection bulb indicator, but the real deal is acidity in the coolant. I check with a voltmeter--negative lead grounded on block, positive lead in the coolant at the radiator filler neck. .8VDC and your coolant is DONE. A mild acid, dissimilar metals in contact with the coolant, and you have the making of a battery. Electrolysis does the damage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,822 Posts
All of which strays a bit from my initial question: what coolants are you liable to run into in a regular auto parts store that still have silicates in them? Are they even out there for general sale any more?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,675 Posts
I wouldnt know without examining the coolant container or reading a product description online. I dont buy coolant at auto parts stores--I purchase mine from my ex-employer so I know what I'm getting.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top