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Discussion Starter #1
I have a new to me 2012 650 that I bought from a dealer so I don't have access to the prior owners information. The bike has a very nice Ohlins shock that I'd like to adjust for my weight. I'm somewhat familiar with setting up the front forks preload and rebound but the preload on the rear isn't adjustable by a screw, it's got 2 spanner nuts. The rebound adjustment is with a wheel at the bottom of the shock. Any suggestions on how to set up this rear shock would be helpful. I could only get my front sag to 20mm so I'm thinking if I can get some more preload in the rear that would help with the front end.
 

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You'll need the proper wrench from Ohlins, or a knock-off, to adjust preload on the shock. You want about 40mm of sag, front and rear.

I suspect that your front sag measurement is off. Unless someone screwed up the installation of aftermarket fork springs there's no way that you have only 20mm of sag. Here's the method to use:

Sonic Springs - Setting Sag

The Stroms have a little more travel than the average street bike, so they need a little more sag than the 30-35mm spec'd in that article.

One thing. You absolutely have to have a helper to get an accurate sag number.
 

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Your either have a shock spring that's too soft or not enough preload on the rear. I would guess the former.
Because of differences in shock linkages and the difficultly in measuring shock preload, it's best to work from sag ratios. You're looking for about 10-15mm of bike sag and 40mm of total sag.
If you can't get the numbers to line up with preload adjustments then the rate is wrong.
 

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TBH, I would find a local suspension shop to do the adjustments for you. Suspensions are a black art and getting it right can make a huge difference. Moreover, since the bike is new to you they would able to tell you if the Ohlin shock is out-of-range for your weight and any other issues. An adjustment visit is probably only around $100 if not less.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was told it was set up for 225 lbs rider but I weigh with gear around 200. Something isn’t right. I’d like to find a competent local suspension guy but haven’t been very successful. Not too many motorcycle suspension specialists here on Long Island.
 

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I was told it was set up for 225 lbs rider but I weigh with gear around 200. Something isn’t right. I’d like to find a competent local suspension guy but haven’t been very successful. Not too many motorcycle suspension specialists here on Long Island.
25lbs isn't enough to really matter.

Grab a friend and do some careful sag measurements, if you have good data getting things dialed in isn't too hard.
 

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Listen to RichDesmond.

What he understands about suspension is likely a lot more than any local suspension guru.

It isn't really black magic. It is just that too many won't sit still long enough to properly adjust the suspension to a good starting point. RichDesmond has given you the tips to start doing that. It really is that simple! Even a stock suspension can be improved by this basic measuring and adjusting. Even if you don't have heavy enough springs, getting it set as correct as possible makes more difference than many realize.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I agree, it's not black magic. It's much more trial and error based on some fundamental sag measurements. I've done this before and depending on how OCD you are will determine your level of satisfaction. Getting it "perfect" can be a bit frustrating. Results will definitely be better than if you assume the stock setting is what's best for you.
 
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