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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I'm the new owner of an older V-Strom. Just got it yesterday and HOLY COW the reviews were right! This bike is SO MUCH FUN to ride!!!!

I'm hooked! AND, I already have questions!!!

I have a 2013 650A, and I think I got a GREAT deal. Got it from a fabulous gentleman, who unfortunately had a medical diagnoses which has limited his riding, so he had to sell. It only has 1,500 miles on it. It's super clean, all service records etc. Lotsa goodies came with it.

Anyway, dos this model have seat lowering options? I can't seem to find anything about that.

Also, I'm sure it's on these forums, but what have you done to remedy that pesky throttle issue?

I still lovvvvvve this bike and can't wait to go lay more on it!
 

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Welcome!

First thing to do about the throttle is to take the slack out of the cables. Makes a world of difference in low speed/light throttle operation. Done by peeling back the rubber cover on the cable set that comes out of the throttle control housing. Pretty obvious and easy what to do when you get where you can see the adjuster.
 

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They make lowering links, some like kubota are adjustable. Would want to adjust triple trees up front to maintain geometry. Don’t go too low with links though, I looked at one before I bought mine that was damaged from lowering it to the extent that the rear tire made contact with the fairing/fender that protects battery / electrical stuff and cracked it. There are also aftermarket lower seats. Depending on how much lower you need maybe a combination of those options would work. You might just “get used to it” too. I had an Xr650 (37” seat height) that I had to slide off the seat to the side at stops to get a foot down. My 650 feels so well balanced I rarely put both feet down at stops even though I can.
 

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You can also lower the seat about 1/2" by removing the rubber bumpers under the seat. It will rattle a bit if riding while standing up in the dirt. Otherwise, no bad things happen.
 

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Welcome!

First thing to do about the throttle is to take the slack out of the cables. Makes a world of difference in low speed/light throttle operation. Done by peeling back the rubber cover on the cable set that comes out of the throttle control housing. Pretty obvious and easy what to do when you get where you can see the adjuster.
I would add to RealShelby's comment... I tried this method on my Vee2 (2104 DL1000) when it was new. I had to open up that upper cable adjustment all the way so that only a few threads were still engaged. Still didn't quite get to the standard set point of 1/8" freeplay in the throttle.

When I took it in for the 600 mile service, I mentioned it to the shop and they said they'd take care of it. When I got it back they had simply screwed it back together, reintroducing all the extra slop.

After looking at the service manual's procedure for adjusting the throttle cables on the other end (where they attach to the throttle bodies), I figured I was screwed because their procedure was to simply screw them all the way in and then back them off X number of turns. DOH! There are a few threads about how to adjust the pull open vs pull closed throttle cables on this forum if you need to go that far.

Turns out that the first time I pulled the air box off and could actually see the throttle cables at the throttle body end they were absolutely not set to spec from the factory. I followed the procedure in the service manual and was able to properly adjust the rest of it from the upper adjustment that RealShelby mentioned.

Long story short... If you don't get it to the right spot on the upper adjuster, there is another adjustment to be made down below.

This helped some, but ultimately had to learn to feather the clutch for stop and go traffic.

Some say that removing excess slack from the drive chain also helps, but keep in mind that the chain being too loose is FAR better than the chain being too tight.

When Suzuki recalled the ECU on certain Vee2's that also made a significant improvement. However, I still use the clutch to smooth out the snaps when rolling back on the power at slow speeds (low gears) .
 

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Welcome on board. And yes, there is OEM Suzuki low seat available for your model. Check the For Sale section here. I think there was one for sale not a long time ago.
 

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I could get 2 weeks work of groceries in that trunk. Its huge!

Where do you hale from? Maybe find some like minded riders.
 

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I could get 2 weeks work of groceries in that trunk. Its huge!

Where do you hale from? Maybe find some like minded riders.
Be careful putting a bunch of weight in that trunk. Having weight high and behind the rear axle will (very) negatively effect the handling.

Nice bike, I like the white and that model year of 650 the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ya, the top case came with the bike, It's nice for helmet storage etc. Think it's a 46L? The guy gave me a bunch of extras, figured I could post them on here if I don't need them

These bikes sure are fun! Don't worry, Not a noob, just new to this bike and type of bike. Getting used to it pretty quickly though!
 

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Do the adjustment on the throttle cable and then get use to it. Many things tend to "fix themselves" in time. There is a shorter Suzuki seat available for your model. Likely you can find a good used one somewhere. You never mentioned what bike/bikes you had in the past. Don't be shy about giving a little history on here. Fact is it will help people help you if they know a little more about your background.

Personally I have owned/raced bikes for decades. I currently have sold off all my liter + bikes and just have my 2017 DL650 Wee. It replaced my 2005 Wee and my Triumph Tiger 1050. The DL650 is a very versatile machine that will handle lots of types of riding. Its a good pick for an all-around bike. Oh, and that giant case...its been mentioned about how you shouldn't put too much weight back up there. Any weight in that case, that far back and that high will throw off the balance of the bike and result in possible handling issues.

Enjoy your new ride!
 
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