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Discussion Starter #1
What is the go with riding the Nullabor in Sept? ie, is it rainy season or what?
2nd question; anyone interested in doing a bike swap with me here in Un Zud? My thoughts were that I could, under my insurance, let anyone over 25 use my bike{with a valid license} and so if I could find someone interested in doing some riding in NZ, then they could just swap like for like. I envisaged getting on a plane, with Givi panniers, and flying over and getting on a bike I am very familiar with to ride over to Perth to visit friends there. That idea appeal to anyone here wanting to visit NZ?
3rd question; Having crossed the Nullabor, would you want to come back that way or is it a oncer?
Thanks, Al
 

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Weather ok, not to hot.

Do it twice? There is only one tree to look at. :green_lol:

The Nullabour is only a short strectch of a very long boring ride from Perth to the rest of the world. I've done it by car, train and bike. Some people ride pushbikes, horses, and even walk across the Nullabour.
 

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The tree is not a queue. It is a quandong.

You never know quite what you'll find for weather, when crossing the Nullarbor. The seasonal averages will give you a fair bet . . . yet odd meteorological turns can bring you surprises.

In summer, you may get tropical monsoonal rainclouds sweeping that far south, and giving you rain for almost the entire trip, instead of the hot/dry Perth-type climate that should be baking you.
Spring and autumn can sometimes give you a few days of Antarctic chill.

And odd little swirls of airstream can give micro-climate changes for a quarter hour or so. (On my latest trip, I had a digital thermometer on the bike . . . and east of Eucla [SA/WA border] there came a sudden warm feeling as I cruised along . . . and sure enough, tick-tock tick-tock, the indicated temperature had risen 4 degrees C. It all gradually settled back to what it was before . . . and then within half an hour, whoof, it suddenly climbed 8 degrees C.
Weird, because it was all flat terrain ~ no hills, valleys, or coastal formations to channel the air currents.)

For the eastwards trip itself, you will get arid farmland west of Ceduna; a brief "null-arbor"; then a lot of scattered low bushes; then the horizons are gone and you have a seemingly endless run to Norseman amongst low gum trees where each kilometre appears the same ~ and you can stop every metre for a leak. Never any queuing.

Some think the cross-Nullarbor run is boring. But they have the wrong attitude. Much better, in a Buddhist way, to consider it a restful & meditative experience.
No bears, crocodiles or suchlike mega-fauna for your camera. Not much in the kangaroo line, either (but still not wise to do any fast cruising during early morning or late afternoon, or night ~ but that's something that applies pretty much Australia-wide). If you wish to refresh your animal spirits, just stop your bike anywhere along the way . . .even the most desolate places will show you a surpassing amount of micro activity going on, with lizards & beetles & various sizes of ants, all living a micro-New-York frenzy of activity.
Just remember those ants and choose wisely, when you come to select your campsite placement [I have assumed that you will be carrying a tent : you won't have any difficulties finding a free tent site out of view of the road traffic.]

Coming back from Western Australia will mean [lucky you!] using the Nullarbor highway again . . . unless you decide to divert far, far to the north (the northern road going close by Stonehenge, according to Bazza McKenzie).
But at least you have some route choices west of Norseman and east of Ceduna.
Good luck. The scenery is definitely un-Unzud-ian.
.
 

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Correction, paragraph five.
I meant westwards from Ceduna !!

Which points up a danger, if you have dash of my disorientation ~ make sure you head in the right direction after striking camp in the morning.
Annoying and embarrassing, after a day's fast travelling, to find yourself back where you had been, just two nights before.
.
 

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Wouldn't call september the rainy season in West Aus, in fact alot of us over here have forgotten what rain is.
You could be unlucky tho.
Personally I love traveling the nullabor. Its a lot of nothing, nothing, nothing. Long, flat, straight rd. Lets you clear the head.
Its only a couple days so go for it.

wizzer
 

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Correction, paragraph five.
I meant westwards from Ceduna !!

Which points up a danger, if you have dash of my disorientation ~ make sure you head in the right direction after striking camp in the morning.
Annoying and embarrassing, after a day's fast travelling, to find yourself back where you had been, just two nights before.
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LOL, Last time i was at Cocklebiddy (a roadhouse on the nullabor), a lady who slept at the motel asked for the directions to Melbourne. Had to laugh at that one. Could've been so mean.

wizzer
 

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Quite. A bit over 2000 kilometres to Melbourne one way, and 20000 k's the other way.

There's a story from 30+ years ago, in the Northern Territory, about a bloke who was driving westwards from Camooweal [on the Queensland border] to Tennant Creek [on the north-south Stuart Highway].
The road was [and still is] flat and straight, passing through featureless flat grassland for most of the eastern part.
The first stop or watering hole was the pub at Barry Caves, being 167 km from Camooweal. (Alas, the splendid Barry Caves pub nowadays demolished, and the site non-existent.)
Arriving there after sunset, said bloke parks near vehicles which he recognises as belonging to some mates of his, and goes into the pub, leaving his keys in the car [as you do, when in the middle of the outback].
He leaves, a couple of convivial well-lubricated hours later, jumps into his car, and heads straight off. Boring on through the night for two hours . . . he arrives at the lights of Camooweal.
(A couple of "friends" had sneaked out of the pub, and turned his car 180 degrees about.)
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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Good times, good times!
Well you haven't put me off although there will be me and wife which means no camping as she doesn't do tents! Unless I put me foot down, haha!
Here is a current photo of my much modified V.
 

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No camping???

There are endless free camping sites along that road. Just pull over anywhere you want and make a little fire. Just make sure you are well away from the road, the road trains go all night. Also, watch out for the fresh road kill they leave behind.

Look out for all the decorated tree's, can't miss them. People will put anything on a tree!
 

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I assume you know Mike Couchman. Have a chat to him. We did the Nullabore last year in April and it was a hoot!

If you don't know him let me know, and I'll drag out his phone number.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No camping???

There are endless free camping sites along that road. Just pull over anywhere you want and make a little fire. Just make sure you are well away from the road, the road trains go all night. Also, watch out for the fresh road kill they leave behind.

Look out for all the decorated tree's, can't miss them. People will put anything on a tree!
Yeah i know, but I'm up for it! Will have to see how the girl feels as time goes by.

I assume you know Mike Couchman. Have a chat to him. We did the Nullabore last year in April and it was a hoot!

If you don't know him let me know, and I'll drag out his phone number.
Yeah man I met you at his place at a Ulysses xmas do?
He is nothing but trouble plus he crashes! Bahahahaha!
 

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Laava,I have been over and back on the wee and I must concur with "mid" if you leave Ceduna and have the mindset of one stop 900k days get me outta here you will not enjoy as it is long and flat but google up some POI's make it a two stop crossing soak up the Aussie outback and enjoy.Watch out for the Dingo's they eat babies.:yikes:
 

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Agreed. Don't hurry & rush.

Especially travelling two-up. You as rider may well be enjoying the unrolling of the scenery in front of you, but your pillion passenger is just getting the side view. And on this ride there aren't the mountain ranges or river valleys & chasms which can enliven the side-view for the passive tourist observer.

Particularly on the section of highway east of the W.A./S.A. border, there's a number of places (only a short distance from the road) where you can stop and "waste" a lot of time on the ocean views. Here the plateau of the Nullarbor Plain drops vertically into the Southern Ocean. The great stretches of cliff face look superb; the empty ocean extends to cloud-scaped horizons [ocean empty unless a few whales or dolphins . . . or in-shore seals surfing the waves] and endless rows of surge sweep in from Antarctica to crash at the cliff base. Almost hypnotic.
I imagine that these stops would be memorable for your wife (and yourself), as well as providing welcome breaks from just sitting.
Just be a bit careful at the cliff edges. Unless you (or she) are well insured . . . but now that I think of it, the body would never be found or recovered . . . so it might be a 7 year wait until the insurance pay-out came through.

There are various other side-trips off the highway, but most of them you'd have to research first . . . but your time is limited, and most of that would be more deservingly spent seeing the southwest of W.A.
One small extra point ~ all the highway is flat, except for a strange "sunken" section [also flat] like a low shelf, extending 180 Km from Eucla to Madura. More so on the western section, there is a thin but even scattering of trees.
I always pause at the cliff-top where the road plunges down the so-called "Madura Pass" ~ and take a few minutes for the easterly view out over this sunken shelf, where [with a little imagination] the scattered trees present a picture resembling the Serengeti Plain. Giraffe-less, though.
.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Those are awesome pics thanks P! I am a step or 2 closer to turning this into a reality. I have a question tho, how long at "relaxed pace" will it take to go Sydney to Perth?
My wife has recently had her best friend move to Perth on a belated OE and we are needing to spend at least 5 days with them so am hoping to spend about 3 weeks in total.
 

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Those are awesome pics thanks P! I am a step or 2 closer to turning this into a reality. I have a question tho, how long at "relaxed pace" will it take to go Sydney to Perth?
My wife has recently had her best friend move to Perth on a belated OE and we are needing to spend at least 5 days with them so am hoping to spend about 3 weeks in total.
That is a big call Laava,will you be two up with the bride or solo?the most direct route or the more scenic--will you be riding back to the east?
 

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The most direct route is about 4000km, if you call 500km a day a relaxed pace with lots of time to sight see & side track thats a total journey of 8 days!
Please post some pics of the adventure & good luck
 

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Yeah i know, but I'm up for it! Will have to see how the girl feels as time goes by.



Yeah man I met you at his place at a Ulysses xmas do?
He is nothing but trouble plus he crashes! Bahahahaha!
Laava,having been there and the 3 weeks you have up your sleeve I'm thinking off to Perth at 30,000 ft and enjoy your time with friends,your time frame does not include the strom and the big plain--that is a separate journey.
 

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Reluctantly, I would have to agree with the opinion by Windinhair.

For a solo ride by an enthusiast : a few days in Perth "and environs", book-ended by a somewhat leisurely 6-7 days ride each way from/to Sydney, would be a fine holiday.
But two-up with the Better Half, on a tightish schedule, without much scope for dealing with unexpected problems ~ and possibly unpleasant patches of bad weather . . . could easily turn out to be quite a trial for her, with more negatives than positives.

Plane and hire-car [or better still, a "borrow-car"] might be a slightly boring & mainstream choice, but is probably the wiser choice for this time round.

The Nullarbor, and all its "feeder-roads", will still be there for next time.
Perseverance's photos are good . . . but the reality is even better.
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