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Discussion Starter #1
I took my 09 650 into a local dealer here last week for a valve clearance check, throttle sync, and fork spring install. I think they also checked a few other minor things, like tire pressure (which I know they did as you will see in a second).

So, I get the bike back and something surprises me. The mechanic who worked on it with many years of experience says to me that when he was putting the guards back on (the ones to protect the plastic in case of a drop), he reversed them at first and lightly scuffed the paint on the right side. :yesnod: He says it should be no big deal and that it should buff right out with a little wax, and that he would have done it but didn't have any wax. Red flags go up because I think, "Uh-oh, if this guy can't get that right, what else might be wrong???" About a day after I leave the shop, I notice I am now missing the valve stem cap on the rear tire (this is how I know he checked tire pressure). WTF??? He can't remember to put the cap back on???

Today, I go to jump on the bike and want to use my GPS. I plug it into my cigarette lighter plug, which is connected directly to the battery. I blow three separate fuses trying to troubleshoot the issue. :headbang: And when I take the seat off, I discover that the experienced mechanic disconnected the rubber strap to hold the battery down, but did not re-connect it. He also removed the rubber cover on another nearby plug and did not put it back on. And that is just what I can see.

Now I am a bit pissed off and more importantly, am not sure I even have confidence that my bike is safe to ride. I have never had a single issue with the bike and now this crap is happening. What do you guys think I should do? At a minimum, I will be re-visiting the shop to have a word with them on Tuesday when they re-open.

ETA: BTW, I did try buffing out the scuff marks. No dice. What a surprise that is!
 

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Well I'll tell you. Start learning to work on your own stuff.

Obviously that doesn't really help dealing with this shop. But it seems to me that they should be paying to fix the damage done while it was in their custody. I'm going to stress that paying part, as I wouldn't let them get within 20 feet of the bike with a ten foot pole. If you really feel it's not safe take it to a more reputable place and have everything checked out. But talk to this shop first and let them know they ARE paying for it.
 

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For starters go back and tell him he owes you for a new painted part. Tell the shop owner your concerns and what you found. No need to be aggressive or nasty about it, just matter of fact and that you want him to make it right. If he responds positively that's a good sign.
If not, then find somebody else to work on the bike.
Check what you can, the things that would involve safety, oil, chain tension, tires. Take it for a ride and see if anything feels strange.
 

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+1 on what Wingnut says. It may do no good at all to complain to them, but it definitely won't do any good if you don't. And one good thing about complaining (and complaining in a forceful, non "aw shucks" sort of way) is that the shop will more likely remember you for your next visit. It might push the balance enough in your favor that they will take more care next time, if for no other reason to avoid the hassle of dealing with you afterwards if they are sloppy again. At the very least, they should be fixing the scuff marks that they left on your bike.

Make sure when you deal with a shop in the future, you know exactly what they will be doing on your bike when you take it in for scheduled service. Ask the service manager specifically what they will be servicing, make sure you're in agreement with what they are going to do, and tell them you want to see any parts they change (like an air filter, or plugs). Make sure they know that you're not agreeing to any other services unless they call you first for approval. If they start giving you grief, then it's time to find a better shop. I ride for an hour to get my Harley worked on, just because of the attitude of my local Harley shop; when a shop acts like they are doing you a favor when they work on your bike, it's time to take your bike and your wallet somewhere else.

Wingnut's also right about working on your own stuff. One of the first accessories I bought was the service manual. Those $200.00 oil/filter changes, tire changes, etc can all be done in your garage with minimal tools for about a fourth of the price.
 

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Every village, or dealership, needs an idiot, you found theirs. PITA. It would make not go there again after I got the managers ear full of what you found wrong.
 

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Go to Walmart get the 3M liquid compound to rub/polish out your paint

also with microfiber cloth will polish face shields
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I generally do try to work on my own stuff, but have been under a time-squeeze lately and thought, "what the heck could it hurt?" I have had good experiences with them in the past as have a few other folks I know, so I didn't really hesitate taking it to them. Of course, now, I will be very reluctant to take the bike there. Sad because I know the folks that run the place and I think it boils down to the one new mechanic who, despite having a ton a certifications, at the very least simply does not give a crap to do it right.

I did think about getting some sort of compound for the scuff but after spending about an hour addressing an issue with a hard-to-reach plug (he left the protective rubber cap off and dislodged one of the wires going into the plug), I decided that they can take their time, energy, and money and make it right.
 

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I decided that they can take their time, energy, and money and make it right.
Since you already made your decision I make the following witty statement for the benefit of everyone here, except you:

Let them keep their time and energy it's obviously not worth the money anyways.
 

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I generally do try to work on my own stuff, but have been under a time-squeeze lately and thought, "what the heck could it hurt?" I have had good experiences with them in the past as have a few other folks I know, so I didn't really hesitate taking it to them. Of course, now, I will be very reluctant to take the bike there. Sad because I know the folks that run the place and I think it boils down to the one new mechanic who, despite having a ton a certifications, at the very least simply does not give a crap to do it right.

I did think about getting some sort of compound for the scuff but after spending about an hour addressing an issue with a hard-to-reach plug (he left the protective rubber cap off and dislodged one of the wires going into the plug), I decided that they can take their time, energy, and money and make it right.
Sounds like you're actually in a better position than most, since you actually know the owners. It gives you a fallback position in case you don't get any satisfaction from talking to the service manager
 

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post the name of the dealer here so others can learn NOT to trust them. doesn't help you much but...

and if you get no joy from them being nice, don't waste time. small claims court and BBB.
 
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