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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, sadly i'm not going to be able to use my bike for the next year and will be sticking to my car. Therefore i'll be leaving it parked in the garage.

I will have someone to start it up and let the engine run every 2 weeks or so, but apart from that, do I need to do anything else? Like will the fuel degrade or damage the engine if its not changed in a year? I've heard of some people adding fuel stabilisers. Are these advised or not worth it?
 

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I wouldn't even bother starting it up every two weeks. Put a battery tender on it or disconnect the battery completely, and put it on the centerstand if you have one (to minimize tire flatspotting, but that's only a temporary condition). I haven't had any problems with fuel that's only a year old, either, only with fuel a couple years or older (in my experience).
 

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fuel stabilizer cannot hurt and it's cheap insurance. fill the tank to minimize condensation and run the bike with the stabilizer to distribute it through the lines.

give metal parts a light coat of wd-40.
 

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+1 on everything above. A year is not that long and I wouldn't have someone start it up and let it idle. Not much good can come from that.
 

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--Change the oil and run it momentarily before you lay it up.
--Add petrol stabilizer to a full tank of petrol. When you're ready to ride siphon that old petrol out, burn it in your car, and ride with fresh petrol.
--Air the tires up to the sidewall max pressure. When you ride correct the pressure to the pressure you like (or that shown on the swingarm sticker).
--Connect the automatic trickle charger to the battery. (If it isn't a sealed battery you can fully charge it then drain out the acid. Replace the acid and recharge when you're ready to ride.)
--What do you use in the U.K. to keep moths out of woolen clothing? In the U.S. we use moth balls or a moth block made from naphthalene or paradichlorobenzene. They keep bugs and rodents away and prevent mold from growing. You can put these in various locations where mice might nest or chew the wiring.

Don't just have the engine run. It would do more good to take it out for a half-hour or longer run where everything gets thoroughly warmed. Or lay it up as described above. A no-load run of a few minutes just draws moisture in.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the advice. Some really great tips there! Will definitely be implementing them!
 

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All good points above, but I just want to stress NOT to start the engine. Cold starting puts a lot of wear and tear on a motor since oil is not always where it needs to be right away. It also promotes water condensating in the motor oil.

I stored my Wee for over a year - I stabilized the gas and filled the tank, placed it on the centerstand, kept the battery charged, and took the seat off because mice like to nest under it. It started right up after a year+ I ride it regularly now with no problems.
 

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One that I have seen used is to put paddock stands under the bike front and rear to get the wheels off the ground. It stops flat spots from forming due to sitting in one place constantly. I'd also suggest making sure you don't have a tank of ethanol laced fuel when you store it. It will go nasty and do damage far faster than proper petrol, so my opinion is to fill it with a tank of premium non-ethanol fuel, stabilise it with your choice of product and make sure the tank is full to the top.
When storing LONG term I've heard of people disconnecting the battery, taking out the plugs and filling both the bores with oil, then refitting the plugs loosely with no leads, and filling crankcase to the very top with oil. Turning it over like that would be a bad thing of course, but it prevents condensation and dry bearings. You could even go all out and block the crankcase breather and fill it to the top of the heads, keeping the entire engine filled with oil, but I think that's going a bit overboard. It would prevent dry bearings and cam-chains etc but you'd have to drain everything when you get back. I do think this would be a bit excessive though.
 

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Does England have ethanol in the Gas ?

Fresh oil and filter and a GOOD squirt of fogging oil in the gas and crancase and the exhaust. Perhaps cover openings with a little screen

Gas needs to be fresh stabilized and filled right up to the top of the neck

Take the battery out and only a REAL tender will save it. Probably easier to just pitch it and buy new
 

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Another thought just occurred to me. It might be worth getting a buttplug for your pipe ... the bike's exhaust that is, something like this:



They keep water, condensation and vermin etc out of the pipe.
 

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Another thought just occurred to me. It might be worth getting a buttplug for your pipe ... the bike's exhaust that is, something like this:



They keep water, condensation and vermin etc out of the pipe.
+1
I was just getting ready to post the same. I keep one in all my exhaust when not riding. I also use them when I wash it to keep water out.
If I were storing mine it would have a plug in it.
 

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I would add a cover to all of the recommendations.

Because of an ill-timed move, my bike has been resting in mom's garage since this time last year. 40C plus summer temperatures and -40C winter. The tank is full. The oil and filter were changed just before it was parked (not planned, just serendipitous). I managed to give it a wash and lubricate the chain and WD40 a few vulnerable spots. On the centre stand. The battery has been on a battery tender, and it has been covered the whole time. The cover is one of the inexpensive ones on EBay - less than $20 delivered I think.

Last weekend I finally got back to it. Cover off. Battery Tender unhooked. Checked that there was oil. Started first push and ran like new.

If you're storing it in a safe an dry place, those basics should do fine. In the past I have sometimes fogged inside the plug holes with WD40 or put a teaspoon of oil in there. I neglected to shove an old, oily rag into the exhaust, but it doesn't look like anything has taken up residence there.
 

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Oh, and here's a trick I learned from vintage guys who have a habit of storing their one of a kind 70's Ducatis in damp gardening sheds. Cover the bike and put a 25 or 40 watt bulb inside a clay flower pot - the pot upside down - under the bike. It is just enough to keep dampness off the bike.
 

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I oppose sealing the pipes except when washing

DONT wash and put away make sure it has been brought up to FULL heat before storage at least a 20 minute ride

Cover does make sense NOT if its breezy as blowing fabric will cut paint
 

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My habit is to tuck the rag that I've used to clean up the chain and anything else oily into the end of the pipe, not shoved down in to seal it, but enough to deter wildlife. I agree with wash, then run it to burn off moisture.
 

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If I were storing my bike for one year I would seek therapy. The machine will be just fine, but the human will suffer a bit more.
 

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I need therapy. This week marks a year since our move from small town to big city; big city where the tiny, single car garage is full when the car and lawn mower are in there, and there is no where else for the car and lawnmower. So it was a year ago that my bike was washed and prepped for not-this-long storage, at least I didn't plan it that way, in mom's garage. It's covered and the battery is on a battery tender, and I just don't have time to do anything about it.

Please send me the number of a qualified therapist.
 

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Remove the battery and store in a cool place, fill the tank to the brim and get both wheels off the ground. Cover the bike with an old sheet and store away from direct sunlight and take anti rodent action if you think it necessary. Drain most of the tank before re-start and dump it in your car, use fresh fuel and charge the battery if necessary.
 
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