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Changed the front sprocket.. I got the proper bolts and spacer when I put the cover back on, but now the clutch lever won't pull. '06 DL1000
 

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Changed the front sprocket.. I got the proper bolts and spacer when I put the cover back on, but now the clutch lever won't pull. '06 DL1000
So is the clutch lever jammed - or is the clutch lever loose and floppy and does not activate the clutch?
This is a common issue when changing sprockets as the clutch actuator can easily be reassembled incorrectly or fall apart while disassembled. See these threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So is the clutch lever jammed - or is the clutch lever loose and floppy and does not activate the clutch?
This is a common issue when changing sprockets as the clutch actuator can easily be reassembled incorrectly or fall apart while disassembled. See these threads.
The lever is jammed. Rod not bent. I think I'll have to do the fiddle thru the filler hole thing. Any advice, pictures, as how do do it right? Really dont want to take off the clutch cover.
 

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Guys. A common problem when taking off the side cover is that some recommend that you strap the clutch lever in before disassembling. The problem is that when reassembling it pushes the clutch plates too far and the tips on the outside of the finer plates push past the finger on the clutch basket and then the clutch is permanently "open" and the engine revs like the clutch lever is pulled in. Sometimes, if you're lucky, you can put a screwdriver through the oil filler hole and push them back into position. If not the whole cover has to c one off, the clutch disassembled and the plates reassembled correctly. Takes a few hours.
 

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The outer clutch plate sitting on top of one of the basket fingers might not be your problem as you state that the clutch lever is locked.
If the problem was in the clutch basket your lever should be free to move and offer no resistance. I would first look that the slave cylinder is working correctly and fitted correctly. Read through those threads.

If you still wish to inspect the clutch plates it is difficult to see in there - but not impossible. Put the bike in gear and with the rear wheel off the deck turn the engine a little by turning the rear wheel and inspect with a flashlight and repeat.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The outer clutch plate sitting on top of one of the basket fingers might not be your problem as you state that the clutch lever is locked.
If the problem was in the clutch basket your lever should be free to move and offer no resistance. I would first look that the slave cylinder is working correctly and fitted correctly. Read through those threads.

If you still wish to inspect the clutch plates it is difficult to see in there - but not impossible. Put the bike in gear and with the rear wheel off the deck turn the engine a little by turning the rear wheel and inspect with a flashlight and repeat.
Yes. Apparently not the common problem of pushing the plates too far apart that they lock that way and won't come together (engage) again. It's that I cant push the rod to get them to come apart (disengage). I've had the slave off four times now. When I hold it in my hand and pull the lever, the cylinder moves out. But when I put it back on, the lever won't move at all. The rod is not bent and I've mounted it very carefully so as not to "gink" anything. What could be keeping the rod from moving in toward the clutch plates?
'
 

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You can remove your oil fill cap and see if the pressure plate is out of the splines it should be mated with. The outer lip of the pressure plate should be about level with the edge of the fingers on the clutch basket.

If it sticks out too much, there have been owners that used screwdrivers to try to make the pressure plate move against the inner hub. Putting the bike in 6th gear and having someone bump the rear tire to shake the inner hub seems to help too. Otherwise, removing the clutch cover and then loosening the pressure plate springs is the way to fix that problem.

I can say I have not had anyone say they have "locked" their clutch lever. So, I cannot really say what I think is going on.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, it,s fixed. After "carefully" reinstalling the slave cylinder I discovered that I has mis-aligned the dowel pin on the case with the corresponding hole on the "ear" of the slave. This was causing enough binding to lock the clutch lever. So I put it back on for the umtheent time and tapped the ear back over the pin without breaking anything. Got a nice regular clutch lever feel. But all the messing around with the slave managed to produce the infamous separated plated on the opposite side. After poking around through the filler hole and rocking back and forth in gear, there was a happy "clink" as things fell into place. Works great now. I feel very fortunate that I didn't have to get a new slave cylinder and pull the clutch case filled with expensive synth oil, and bleed the radiator, etc,etc, Instead, I took a nice little spin and my blood pressure dropped 13 points. Thanks for the help.
 

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wow are you lucky.

I had to disassemble a friends bike — yes a friend — cause no matter what I did couldn't get it back in
 

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Some people have all the luck.

When reinstalling the slave, be careful to align everything, tightening each bolt incrementally to keep things square. And don't lose that dowel. I've had one pop out before and not noticed until I went to reassemble. Another thing to consider is not zip tying the clutch lever but, instead, the slave piston itself (to avoid the clutch pack problem).
 

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When reinstalling the slave, be careful to align everything, tightening each bolt incrementally to keep things square.
Actually I recommend wiggling the slave in place by hand until it sits flush against the engine casing. Only then insert the bolts and tighten things. If you do it by hand there's no way you can exert the force required to bend the pushrod, push the outer friction plate over the basket fingers, or cause any other type of damage/misalignment. On the other hand, if you start tightening bolts with spanners or ratchets, when the cylinder is still half a cm from the engine casing, it's a recipe for disaster.
 
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