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Is this a good replacement brand for OEM? Can anyone confirm that their# CR8E/1275 is the correct plug for my 2007 DL650?

Thanks,
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I like the CR8EIX Iridium plugs as replacements. You'll probably never have to replace the plugs again. I put mine in at 17,000 miles and they look and work great at 60,000 miles. OEM replacements are NGK CR8E or DENSO U24ESR-N.
 

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more plug questions

I will most likely go with the iridiums as they have worked well in my cager =Nissan. I have 3 weestroms, 2 are crashed and I am in process of rebuilding one complete bike. I pulled plugs today : one had CR9E which is a different heat range than oem...bike was running great until I got slammed by a cager. The other bike looked like a recent tune up, K&N air filter and CR8EK plugs which have a double electrode. So my ? is why would they switch from oem and any real world experience or performance gains in changing plugs. I know its like an oil/tire thread but besides these iridiums which I am probably going with...any recommendations? Seems like oem should be best. dunno. thanks, Doug
 

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I like the CR8EIX Iridiums. CR9E is a different heat range and I see no reason to go that way. The stock DL1000 plugs have dual electrodes and the stock DL650 plugs have single electrodes. Otherwise, the sizes and heat ranges are the same. Both bikes use the same CR8EIX plugs in Iridiums.
 

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going with the iridiums

putting the dual electrodes back in my spare engine because they look new, are interesting, and after fogging engine I just need something to keep the spiders out :yikes:. Pitching the cr9e because are old and wrong heat range although bike ran fantastic with these. Going with the iridiums because greywolf says are good, they have been in my nissan sentra many miles and cage runs great...and lastly because my 99 yamaha yz400 uses this exact plug and runs super strong plus idles like a purring cat. :thumbup:, Oh and I also like the 3 black racing stripes on them.
 

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I used the iridiums in my DL1000.

Why? I dunno, really. They're only about $7 each at Advance auto. The bike runs exactly the same, which is as expected.

I change them at every valve check, so I have absolutely no need for the longer life potential. I just feel a tiny bit more at peace somehow with iridium plugs. :confused:
 

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I changed the spark plugs on my Vee with 50,000 km soon after I purchased it. When I balanced the TB's, I found that spark plugs where not that accessible, so I decided to change them for iridiums (CR8EIX)

While I know that they are gonna last forever, I would have changed them back for new CR8EK with dual electrode if I didn't got a PC3. The dual electrode helps when the engine is in very lean condition.

My recommendation would be to stick with CR8EK or another multiple electrodes if not retuning the FI.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Only one electrode sparks at a time on a dual electrode plug. The spark occurs on whichever side overcomes the resistance of the gap first. I see no advantage for a lean condition.
 

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Only one electrode sparks at a time on a dual electrode plug. The spark occurs on whichever side overcomes the resistance of the gap first. I see no advantage for a lean condition.
Yep -- a spark is a spark. Fancy multiple electrodes still only make one spark at a time. There are some truly ridiculous plug designs out there based on the multi-spark or "ball of flame" fallacy.

If you need multiple sparks to ensure full mixture burn, you have to use multiple spark plugs, as on the later model Wees.

The point of the dual electrode and iridium plugs is simply longevity and consistency. The dual electrodes split sparking duties, and so they erode at about half the usual rate. The gap stays much more consistent over the life of the plug.

On iridium plugs, it's the same idea -- the thin center electrode resists corrosion and electrical erosion better, so the plugs last a lot longer and are far more consistent over the life of the plug.

In cars, iridium plugs are normally expected to last 60,000 to 100,000 miles. Motorcycle engines spin faster, but there are lots of reports of the same plugs being used in V-Stroms for 40,000 to 60,000 miles with no issues.
 

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dual electrode will only make a single spark, but it will follow the path of least resistance. The side with the richer mixture, smaller gap and colder electrode is most likely to get a spark.

It's not a night and day difference, but it's one more chance on your side not to get misfire.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Side with a richer mixture? That's a stretch. So is colder electrode. The smaller electrode of an Iridium or Platinum plug will do better.
 

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Side with a richer mixture? That's a stretch. So is colder electrode. The smaller electrode of an Iridium or Platinum plug will do better.
I'm only sharing the result I got from switching from CR8EK to CR8EIX. I believe in small electrode enough to put them everywhere I can. I used them in sleds and dirtbikes since I was a teen (that's 15 yrs ago). I even use Iridium in my garden tractor...

The results I got on the DL1000 is actually the first time that I have some downside going with small electrode. It's also the first time that I get an engine that use dual-electrodes as OEM.
 

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A lot of people have gone from the dual electrode plug to the Iridiums. None have reported a worsening as a result until now.
 

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i change ny plugs w/ ngk cr8e 3.99 every time i clean my air filter which is usually every 10,00 miles or so, i don't mind changing the plugs. i like to take them out and see how the engine is running anyway to see what might be building up on them. they usually look slightly grey cocoa color
 

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sparkplus/more to know

spark plugs always are controversial,non=rare metal plugs run better if sufficiant snap kv is avail (reserve spark energy is nesc as leaner mixtures offer more resistance in any gap/larger gaps also force higher voltages) when the off= gassing ocurrs from metal oxidation it promotes a larger flame front which is bennifitial in optimized mixtures {12.6=13.5%}but wears substantially at mixtures greater than 14%.Higher perf is always with the cheaper plug/but if you are not racing/or your mixture is not optimum/ or the snap kv is in question then stock plugs are best since a teem of engineers that are aware of all the variables have worked it out.PS the dual electrodes might have been employed to provide a divide/dual flame front which ussually improves lower rpm combustion , also most of the orig plugs in canada and europe come back 1/2 heat range hotter than cr8,I've noticed a lot of tip in hessitation noted as an injection problem/poor sync combined with atypical loww rpm driving will cool off the plugs/going to a 8 wi\ould make this worse.If you prefer low rpm /lazy touring then try 22 or cr7 and a good sync before spending money on a programmer...oh ,and resistors to shift mapping don,t work enless you eliminate the O2's.(the blocklearn/fuel integrator will justwrite over then in a few miles.
 
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