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$tromtrooper [belated]
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Discussion Starter #1
I am an above knee left leg amputee and am wondering if there are those out there that have done some adapting so they could ride their strom or favorite bike. (not trike) I have seen the pingle solenoid shifters and other setups for shifting but am more curious about balance issues while stopping etc., and what devices have been tried and worked or failed.

I've done some dirt bike riding since I lost my wheel but not any cruising. Unfortunately I have access to a DL1000 from your fallen member, Mountainair, my brother Jim, who we lost this past July. Some of you may have met Jim at your Rapid City, SD rally. Thanks to anyone who would like to chime in, and to those of you got to know Jim, he was a special guy.

Mtnairmist in South Dakota
 

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Wow. Sorry about your loss. That is tough.

As for the DL1000 . . . It's a lot heavier than a dirt bike. I (and others here) have dropped it a number of times. It's tall, and when it starts to go all you can do is get out of the way. I didn't last year and destroyed my ankle.

Have you thought about the Bombardier Spyder? A friend at work can't ride bikes, but loves snowmobiles and is thinking that might be a solution for the warm months.
 

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Some of the maxi scooters might work well for you. Burgmans are pretty good, twist and go wise... no gears no clutch. But they are fairly heavy so that may be a problem. My Burgman 400 is about the same weight as my Wee. The advantage is that both front an rear brakes are hand controlled...ABS is available as well.

The Aprillia Mana allows for fully automatic or shifting and is a nice crossover bike in the tradiional style...still have to hold it up though and rear brake is foot operated.

Otherwise the Can Am trike is a compromise that might work for you. There is always somethingt that will work if you want to ride.
 

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Sorry for your loss. It's good see see that adversity isn't going to keep you down!

Assuming you get past the shifting issue then balance becomes the biggy for you. I ride a DL650 and have ridden a DL1000 and don't find them that different from a weight point of view. I find in most of my riding I tend to stop and balance with one foot. In my case I normally use my left foot when stopped but have used my right on occasion. 99% of the time this works fine for me, but every once in a while (say on an uneven surface or a slippery road) I might need to put down the other foot as well.

I'm 6'2" and am a bit over 245 lbs right now.

..Tom
 

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Living the Stereotype
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mtnairmist,

Do you have a prosthesis?

I've still got all my stuff so I'm trying to think how I'd ride a V-Strom witout my left leg, shifting notwithstanding, and it would seem doable.

It's the starting, stopping and getting on and off that I would think are tricky.

I suppose you could have some sort of actuator for the kickstand. Also, I would really practice low speed manovers to minimize the need for stopping and possibly finding an invisble pothole, etc.

Make the bike work for you. Making sure the bike is were it needs to be for departure before you park will be crucial.

Lowering the seat and suspension couldn't hurt either.

Trading the V-Strom in, if the emotional attachment allows, for something more manageable is always an option.

Best of luck,

Norm
 

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Good on ya for wanting to ride on.
I've got two good legs, although a bit short with only 28" inseams; and I often need my 2 good legs to keep from falling over. So far I've only dropped my Vee twice.
I'd also suggest that you consider a Spyder. I meet a middle aged woman in NH who rides a Spyder and tours with friends on cruisers and she leads the pack in the corners. Apparently her husband just can't keep up. The luggage compartment up front is a bonus.
 

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$tromtrooper [belated]
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks to all for your replies. There are some devices on the market that seem a bit quirky, like deployable training wheels (lol) and such. Regardless, these are big bikes and in my condition nothing is going to be near 100% and as bigboy and v-tom said, balance can be an issue with all born with parts functioning.

The piaggio is interesting. Haven't heard of them before. Not sure it would be a cruiser that I am after but who knows. The trikes, GL1800's etc. would ultimately be the best option and unfortunately Stroms w/ chain drive aren't much of a triker. Any more thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks to all.
 

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What about looking into the Yamaha FJR. There is an automatic version, and its a really nice bike.
 

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... that seem a bit quirky, like deployable training wheels (lol) and such.
A few days ago a motorcycle was coming towards me. I could not figure out what was wrong until it got closer. It had two permanently mounted wheels on the sides, covered with matching colored fairings, turn signals mounted on top. I did not have a chance to look at it at the speed I was traveling, I just want to say there is a possible solution out there.
 

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I ran into two guys riding together a number of years ago

that were both left leg amputees one above the knee and one below. and they both had a prosthetic that they changed into (homemade or at least home modified) when they got on their full size Harleys that had a rubber peg for stops, and one had a set of pegs on the front to shift up (pull) and shift down (push) that was the guy that had the below the knee. the other one had small cups mounted on a stomp up stomp down shifter and a shelf built onto the foot board. I could see the stomp up stomp down shifting and a cup type peg holder working on a strom. This was years and years ago, prosthetics have come a long way, I guess it would depend on how high the amputation is.

where there is will there is a way.
 

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$tromtrooper [belated]
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Discussion Starter #13
mtnairmist,

Do you have a prosthesis?

I've still got all my stuff so I'm trying to think how I'd ride a V-Strom witout my left leg, shifting notwithstanding, and it would seem doable.

It's the starting, stopping and getting on and off that I would think are tricky.

I suppose you could have some sort of actuator for the kickstand. Also, I would really practice low speed manovers to minimize the need for stopping and possibly finding an invisble pothole, etc.

Make the bike work for you. Making sure the bike is were it needs to be for departure before you park will be crucial.

Lowering the seat and suspension couldn't hurt either.

Trading the V-Strom in, if the emotional attachment allows, for something more manageable is always an option.

Best of luck,

Norm
I do have an endoskeleton prosthesis. ( looks like pipes with a knee joint and a foot) This gives me an advantage, if I fall on that side I can unhook the leg and crawl away! I ride mountain bikes and have had plenty of spills to my left as its not practical to stick my leg out and catch yourself because the leg will only accept weight when its straight. Those off-road situations would have to be entirely avoided on anything but a pedal bike.

The issues of shifting and kickstands etc. I personally beleive can be overcome with, like you said, actuators and the desire to overcome. Balance, well that is another matter.

Thanks Stromin' for taking the time to think like a uni legger. This helps!
 

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I have a friend that rides that is mid chest paralized and another friend built him a twist shift (a la Vespa) and double hand brakes. He straps himself in and goes.
Granted its a sidecar, but he is now looking for an articulated sidecar that can be modifed.
Anything is possible and there are a couple of groups of disabled riders out there that will be able to give you even more help to get around what ever gets in your way.
Good luck.
bill.
 

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+1 on the Piaggio suggestion. Go take a look at one. Leans like a bike, but when you come to a stop it'll stand upright (after hitting a switch) without having to put a foot on the ground.
 

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What about looking into the Yamaha FJR. There is an automatic version, and its a really nice bike.
Yeah but... if there are concerns about stability at low speed and when stopped, FJR is so not the right thing. That thing is a pig to push around in neutral even when you have two good legs and had all of your spinach!

It does seem to lose 200 lbs when it gets going though...
 

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I think that with a little practice and determination it would be possible for you to ride the 1000 with confidence.

It might be possible to get the bike to help you with the balance issue by weighting the right side. What I mean is that if the bike had saddle bags, you could add weight to the right side so the bike would have a natural tendency to lean slightly right when you came to a stop. That may be a perfect solution, but it may be enough to give it a try to see if riding the 1000 is for you.


SS
 

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shifter

i met a guy with no left leg . he ran the shifter to a shaft that ran across the engine too the right side of the bike . some race bikes run an extra brake line from the rear brake to a lever obove the clutch lever . do this because applying the rear brake slightly in a corner helps the handleing . and its easyer to do it by hand than with there foot as it would be grinding on the pavement in a right hand turn . with a set up like that you could gear down and use the rear brake at the same time
 

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piaggio

+1 on the Piaggio suggestion. Go take a look at one. Leans like a bike, but when you come to a stop it'll stand upright (after hitting a switch) without having to put a foot on the ground.
some people knock the switch by mistake when off the bike and the bike falls over
 
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