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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi folks, long time lurker here, and about to be newly fledged member as well :)

I've been seriously thinking of getting a "Wee-Strom" for over a year now, as a change from the Kawasaki VN750 cruiser I've been riding for almost 4 years. After spending a few months comparing and sitting on (but not riding) similar bikes like the Kawasaki Versys or BMW F650.

After a while, I decided ABS brakes would be a must on my next bike, which killed the Versys for me (I don't plan on riding off-road), and just liked the looks of the 'strom over the BMW, including the tach/speedo gauges (also, it's cheaper and has dual discs in front versus the single disc). And with me having a 34" inseam, it seems the most comfortable for longer distance riding.

Finally, as a daily city commuter I'd been put off from the 'Strom as "too big" to maneuver easily in and out of traffic, but after an accident I've decided to reduce my city riding... And to reduce my temptation to be "nimble" in traffic as well. Much more of my riding now will be of the touring variety, so the larger, heavier Wee-strom is now a plus in this regard.

Anyway, after the 2012 models were announced, I waited to see what the changes were; after seeing it I was impressed, but also impressed by the idea of spending thousands of bucks less on a late model bike with ABS. The 2012s are hard to come by still where I am, and run well over $9,000 after all the taxes and fees and a few must-have additions like a centerstand. Instead, I've decided to go for a low-mileage 2011 Wee for nearly $3,000 less.

My only remaining concern is that I've not actually ridden a Wee-strom yet, though I have sat on a stationary one and found it very comfortable. But not sure what I can do about that, really.

Also this will be my first bike with a chain drive, after years of riding bikes with low maintenance belt drives and shaft drive (well, I had some belt maintenance done once but at a dealer). I understand I'm gonna have to clean and lube the chain periodically. I've seen it done and it didn't seem like a big hassle like some folks make it out to be, especially with the funky chain brush that fit around the whole chain at once - spin the chain through the cleaner spray mist (aimed first at the inside and then the outside of the chain), wait a few minutes, spin the chain through the brush, spin the chain through a hand towel, then spin the chain through a spray of lube (aimed at the inside of the chain). Then a quick wipe down of some of the overspray. Like, a 5 minute operation total, done about once a month?
 

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i use a loobman chain oiler. it has been working well and is only 40 bucks. No cleaning and just push a button when on longer rides and chain gets oil. I did have problems with it emptying out all over but contacted them and they told me how to fix it.
 

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Welcome! The Strom is a great city bike as well a do almost anything bike.

Don't bother cleaning the chainr, but lube with every tank of gas and every rain ride.

..Tom
 

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I rarely clean my chain and only lube it about every third tank of gas. it has gone nearly 30K miles and is still quiet and showing only a little wear. When I finally do replace it I will go with stock Suzuki parts --they have shown me a lot of quality and worth the price.
 

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If you get a center stand or lifter swing arm stand or even crutch then chain maintenance is not really difficult

Just don't lick it clean*

If your commuting and caught in the rain then some running to dry and a lube is warranted


* If it isn't obvious a body part between chain and sprocket on a running bike will be cut off. Loose clothing rags etc will be dragged in perhaps with you attached.
 

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Robardin
Suzuki runs corporate demo days through late spring and summer across Canada (and I believe in the US). They setup at a variety of dealers and bring in several of their new bikes. I rode a 2011 Wee at the demo day in Brampton early last summer and also had time to ride the V for comparison. 40 minute group ride through the town and on the highway and this really sold me on the Wee. If you find yourself still undecided the summer, attending a demo day would be an option.
Ken
 

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Well, the chain drive is a maintenance PIA compared to other methods but if you keep the bike on paved roads the cleaning interval is reduced considerably. That doesn't mean you don't have to inspect, adjust, and lube it.
 

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Keep your chain clean and your powder dry.

The great advantage of a chain is that this system allows you to change the final drive ratio via the installation of different sprockets. To the best of my knowledge, changing the final drive ratio on a shaft- or belt-driven motorcycle is difficult, if not impossible. Please correct me if I'm wrong here.
 

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I've owned chain and shaft bikes. The new O-ring chains wear very well. I primarily stay on the road and have a center stand so every so often when getting gas or stopping for lunch I lube it with some Loews store chain lube. If I do go off road and get a bit dirty, I take a few shop rags (wet them with some oil) and wrap them around the chain while spinning the wheel with my hand to clean/wipe it down. For replacement, I spend approximately $150 for new chain and sprockets. In all fairness this is less trouble and cost than what my former bike (BMW) required with lubing splines, changing final drive oil, u-joint issue, and potential final drive failure (expensive). The biggest drawback to me is a chain doesn't allow you to keep the rear end as clean and shiny as a belt or shaft drive so what you need to do is ride the bike and stop looking at it.
 

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Can you buy the 2012 adv extras and put on a 2011 or older?
Yes, in the form that fits the older bikes.

About chain maintenance---There are dry, or at least non-goopy, chain lubes that do a very good job and minimize or eliminate the need to clean the chain. The DuPont Teflon Multi-Lube aerosol sold at Lowe's in the U.S. (don't know who stocks it in Canada) is one excellent choice and only US$5. I'm riding a bike with a chain that was lubed with Tri-Flow for the first 19,000 miles and an industrial chain lube with molybdenum disulfide and graphite in an evaporating penetrant for the next 2,000 miles, and it is still running fine, with no need to clean 'cuz it doesn't hold dirt. Lubing every 3rd tank of gas in the dry and every tank in the wet or in abrasive dirt is good.
 

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Lowes stocks it in Canada (at least in Brampton, Ontario).
I stocked up on the spray and also the liquid to take on trips :yesnod:
 

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Yes, in the form that fits the older bikes.

About chain maintenance---There are dry, or at least non-goopy, chain lubes that do a very good job and minimize or eliminate the need to clean the chain. The DuPont Teflon Multi-Lube aerosol sold at Lowe's in the U.S. (don't know who stocks it in Canada) is one excellent choice and only US$5. I'm riding a bike with a chain that was lubed with Tri-Flow for the first 19,000 miles and an industrial chain lube with molybdenum disulfide and graphite in an evaporating penetrant for the next 2,000 miles, and it is still running fine, with no need to clean 'cuz it doesn't hold dirt. Lubing every 3rd tank of gas in the dry and every tank in the wet or in abrasive dirt is good.
My last chain was replaced at over 46,000 miles and still had some life left in it. I ride on gravel roads almost every day, ride in rain and almost any condition except ice or snow on the roads. It was NEVER cleaned. Lubed with Wurth HHS2000 (an oil based product) with every tank of gas and every rain ride (which happend a lot on that chain!)

..Tom
 
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