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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, last week my OEM stator fried on my 08 DL1000, 55,xxx miles. I bought a new one from the local dealer and installed it today. Ohm test across the three sets of wires was fine. Bike started fine, but AC volt test across the three wires with plug disconnected from R/R and engine at 3k rpm was reading about 68-69V-AC. That's low. Connected the plug (stator to R/R) and checked Amps across the battery, which weren't even at 12 while at 3k rpm.

When I took the case apart to remove the fried OEM stator, my magnets were found to be in perfect shape. They were rock solid in place. The gap between each was the same. I put JBWeld in between the magnets just for preventative maintenance. Cleaned everything so no JB anywhere else, and the gaps were not filled completely -- just enough for a security dam to keep the gap between them consistent.

What did I miss? Why would I only get 68-69Volts AC, at 3k rpm, out of a brand new stator?
 

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Well, my 2012 got a new stator due to the recall.

It didn't work right out of the new box!

I would pull the plug again and instead of the AC voltage test do a ground test. Set meter on ohms. One lead on a known good ground, the other lead on any one of the three wires. Check each wire. ANY movement in an analog meter, or ANY change in reading on a digital meter means there is an internal short in the stator.
 

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do a ground test. Set meter on ohms. One lead on a known good ground, the other lead on any one of the three wires. Check each wire. ANY movement in an analog meter, or ANY change in reading on a digital meter means there is an internal short in the stator.
Thanks. I just checked that and all is fine. No resistance showing between the three wires and ground. Resistance among the pairs is consistent.

I'd go back to the dealer and talk to the parts manager, but what else should I be checking or what else would be causing such a low reading on the V-AC? I need ammunition for my chat with the parts manager. He's a nice guy and has treated me well so far. I don't plan to go postal on him but I want to talk informed. Any thoughts about what I could have missed?
 

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I'd go back to the dealer and talk to the parts manager, but what else should I be checking or what else would be causing such a low reading on the V-AC? I need ammunition for my chat with the parts manager. He's a nice guy and has treated me well so far. I don't plan to go postal on him but I want to talk informed. Any thoughts about what I could have missed?
Normally that points to the magnets migrating. But you are sure they are in place and spaced good enough.

What is the actual voltage reading across battery terminals with engine off. Then at idle, then at 5000 rpm?

The bad thing here is that normally electrical components are NOT returnable! Just to confirm, was this an OEM stator or aftermarket?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
prior to installing the stator, I checked the R/R. Based on the diode test, it is fine. Even if the R/R was bad, that would not impact the V-AV test from the stator because the two are disconnected.

yep, I'm certain the magnets are fine. I couldn't move them, and I tried to move each one. So I did the JBWeld dam in between each

voltage across the battery terminals with engine off was 12.7. I figured that was OK for starting the bike and continuing with the tests when I first started.

I don't remember doing the volt test across the battery once it was running. I was focused on the stator tests. Thanks for the advice to do that. I just ran down to the garage and checked. I checked voltage across the battery at idle and it was 14.6. I checked it at 3k and 5k rpm and it was 14.3. Soooooooooooooooooooo, I conclude that the stator MUST be working properly. That leaves me to think that my meter probes were not getting good contact with the female connectors inside the stator plug for the V-AC test.

Any different conclusions you'd draw? If not, I guess the stator is OK.

Now to mount a digital readout LED volt meter on my dash.

(oh, yes the new stator is OEM purchased from the dealer).
 

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voltage across the battery terminals with engine off was 12.7. I checked voltage across the battery at idle and it was 14.6. I checked it at 3k and 5k rpm and it was 14.3. QUOTE]

Your voltage readings are a little strange. Are you sure your instrument is reading correct?

14.6 at idle seems unlikely and it should go up with revving to 3-4k, not down.
 

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Yes, that is better! The voltage shows current being generated so maybe you had a glitch in measuring the A/C readings. \

INSTALL the voltmeter! Best thing you can do for a V Strom!

Lower voltage as the engine revs is probably ok. That is the R/R doing its job. I actually don't like to see 14.6 volts. I don't really like anything over 14.2 on a good system. But there are batteries that are designed to be charged at that voltage, so it is just my old age causing me to wonder about that!
 
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you guys are correct in that I'd guess the higher RPM would bring higher voltage too. Could be my old and inexpensive meter, or it could be operator error of not getting the best connection between probe and battery terminal. Even with alligator clips to play as my "third hand", working the throttle, watching the RPMs and maintaining good contact between probes and battery terminals challenges my coordination level. But at least what it proves to me is that the stator is working.


This next part is probably basis for a new thread but I'll add it here. When I was reading all of the threads here that I could on stator and R/R problems and solutions, I ran across the concept of putting a larger R/R into play in the system. Since the OEM stator on my 08 DL1000 is a shunt type, it only helps the stator to run hotter than necessary. Much of the discussion though was about the DL650. Guys were changing from a shunt to a series -- specifically the SH 847. Greywolf posted that the newer DL1000s are using the SH 847 as OEM stock. He even identified the part number as 32800-31J00. Unfortunately, that doesn't plug into my wiring harness. Some one else identified a Triumph regulator lead as fitting the DL wire harness plugs. On the 650, the Triumph harness fits 3 of the four plugs -- so guys had to solder in one plug. But on the 1000, it is plug and play! Today the UPS man delivered the Triumph harness I ordered. FYI it is part number T2500676. I verified that the Triumph regulator lead fits all four plugs so that I can plug it into the OEM stator, into the DC and the AC ports on the SH 847, and into the wiring harness (Roadstercycle suggests taping up this particular plug and going straight to the battery from the R/R if you buy the SH 847 from them). I found that buying the SH 847 from my local Zuki dealer and the Triumph regulator lead from the Triumph dealer was the least expensive option -- still expensive in my book, but the least expensive.

So my next project is to install the SH 847 so that I am going from a shunt to a series R/R. That should run the stator at a lower temperature and hopefully avoid any future problems. But I won't do that until I have the in-dash digital LED voltmeter installed.

Thanks for all the help and advice!
.
 

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When this topic comes up I like to mention Custom Rewind in Birmingham, AL. I had them rebuild my second self-burning Suzuki stator (long story), and I've been riding with it for a year and a half with no sign of trouble.

Custom Rewind seems to know how to build a DL1000 stator better than Suzuki. I had two Suzi factory stators burn up inside a year, including one after I'd upgraded to an SH847 R/R, but my Custom Rewind job has been going for over a year and a half with no sign of trouble.

As to voltage testing, IIRC I saw something like 90-95 VAC on all 3 legs of the stator @ 5000 rpm, when the stator was freshly rebuilt. The DL1000 K6+ service manual says the stator is bad if output is below 75 VAC @ 5000 rpm on any of the 3 legs.

OP, did you price a Roadstercycle SH847 kit? Obviously you can get an SH847 from different places, but I found the one-stop shopping, with new wiring harness included, helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
did you price a Roadstercycle SH847 kit? Obviously you can get an SH847 from different places, but I found the one-stop shopping, with new wiring harness included, helpful.
the Roadstercycle kit interested me at first. Then I read about the Triumph regulator lead. I wanted to see if it would be plug n play -- which it was! Everything was returnable if not used, so the Roadstercycle kit was a back-up plan. My dealer matched the lowest online price for the SH 847 and the regulator lead was about $10. So, it cost me much less than the kit AND I didn't have to cut the lead off the stator and solder on the one that comes with the Roadstercycle kit. So I figure that I saved time and money. While I did spend time reading many posts on this forum, I chalk that up to research.
 

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I looked at doing the same thing but I wasn't so confident in the Triumph adapter working, and wanted to get back on the road as soon as possible.

How did you mount your SH847? I found it worthwhile to purchase the Roadstercycle mounting bracket for my new SH847. I couldn't make it fit on the bracket for the original R/R.

There's really nothing wrong with either approach. I've seen some second-guessing about bypassing the factory harness, since power goes directly to the battery from the R/R instead. But the Roadstercycle wiring has its own auto-resetting fuse, and I haven't had a single problem with that in over 2 years of use.
 

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How did you mount your SH847?
I set the SH847 just forward of where the OEM stock R/R was bolted on. The SH847 is larger than the stock R/R so I could not fit it exactly where the stock one was, but slightly forward is fine. The ports on the SH847 are quite large and dictate the direction the mounting happens. I attached the SH847 to a plate and then attached that plate to the holes that are tapped into the frame for the OEM R/R brace. Rubber gaskets between metal parts. Lots of room in there behind the tupperware. It may look like a tight fit in the photo but nothing touches or rubs -- plenty of space.
 

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Ah, you fabbed your own mount. Nice work. I also found that although it looks like it might not fit, there is actually plenty of room in there for the larger SH847.

I was concerned about heat dissipation issues, but there don't seem to be any. Since it is a series type, the SH847 is not running at full power at all times so I suppose that helps.

I didn't have the setup at home for such work at the time I installed mine, so it was much easier to just buy the RC mount.

Did you find any use for the original R/R? I'd be willing to give my old one to someone for the cost of shipping, but there doesn't seem to be any demand. I get the impression that people are either running the stock R/R with no issues, or have upgraded to an SH847/similar so have no need of a stock one.
 

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and lastly, I tested the voltage put out by the two R/Rs against each other this morning with my hand-held multi-meter. I have (on my 08 DL1000) LED headlights, LED driving lights on a manual lo-off-hi switch (lo is equivalent to the lo beam headlight and hi is blinding for remote riding), and LED fog lights on an on-off switch. I tested the 10 combinations with the OEM stock R/R and then the SH847. After the testing, the OEM R/R fins were so hot I could not touch it. The SH847 was warm. I tested both R/Rs at idle, 3k rpm and 5k rpm -- voltage across the battery. I couldn't hold the rpm exactly right on 3 or 5, so the tach needle floated up and down, but only a 100 or so rpm either way. The OEM R/R voltage numbers chased the rpm. That second digit to the right of the decimal point was what chased the rpm. The SH847 was constant and stable. Neither went below 14.1 volts at any point, including at idle with everything on hi. At 3 and 5k rpm, the 847 had a more stable reading between the two speeds. The OEM R/R showed more drop in voltage going up to 5k. The 847 showed pretty consistently the same readings at 3 and 5k rpm. The OEM R/R had higher readings at idle than the 847 -- it was running 14.6x volts most of the time at idle while the 847 was running 14.3x volts mostly. The largest voltage difference between the two R/Rs was at idle. With everything on hi, the OEM R/R was up at 14.66v and the 847 was at 14.15v. With everything turned off, the battery was about 12.8v.

YMMV depending on a more precise meter, better connections and a more stable throttle hand.

just FYI.
 

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I use a throttle lock (Vista Cruise) for these tests. Still can't precisely nail 5k rpm or whatever but it's not needed, within 100 rpm is plenty close.

Interesting results. I haven't measured in a while as I haven't had any issues, but IIRC my SH847 puts out a solid 14.5V @5000 rpm, and about the same as yours at idle.

I commend your tenacity. Swapping stators would quickly get tedious. I never bothered doing much measuring with the OE R/R before I upgraded to the SH847.

I wonder if the OE R/R is more prone to output variations due to its nature? As I understand it, being a series-type it is "always on" and at 100%, so more at the mercy of stator output. Any power produced but not used gets dissipated as heat, which I guess is why the OE R/R got too hot to touch while the SH847 did not.
 

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No idea whether this is your issue or not, but over on the vintage Suzuki forum where we deal with the exact same crappy electrics as the modern bikes, we've seen that certain meters have trouble measuring AC voltage at the frequencies generated by a stator.

If I'm mathing right, at 4,000 rpm with an 18 pole stator, you'll see 400Hz. (4,000 rpm X 6 power pulses on each leg per revolution / 60 seconds in a minute).

Any ol' cheapie can read VAC coming from the wall at a measly 60Hz, but higher frequencies can cause electronical befuddlement and dismay leading to falsely low readings.
 
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That's certainly possible. However 400 Hz should be no big deal for any half-decent multimeter. You don't need to consider dispersion effects or treat things as transmission lines until roughly 500 MHz (depending on where you want to draw the line).

If I had access to an electronics lab, I could put that to the test quite easily. I don't get to play with that stuff since I finished my EE degree though.
 
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