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Any way you could go for a 2014+ 1000? Pretty significant upgrade in 2014.

If you compare used prices between a 2014 and a 2010-2012, and then consider upgrades you might want to do to the 2010-2012, might really be cheaper to go with the 2014.
 

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The newer model is a lot nicer than the older. I rode a couple of gen1 DL1000's and was glad I had the 650 to be honest. The Gen2 has it's weaknesses (Basically a bit of a handful in commuter traffic) but is a really nice ride otherwise.
 

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My formula:

1) Rear shock rebuilt, revalved and resprung by "Sasquatch". Excellent bang for the buck to get a rear end that works far better than stock. And of course there are assorted replacement shocks if you want to spend more.

2) Sonic straight-rate springs up front.

3) 5/8" (16mm) raising links out back. Keep the front at stock height. This corrects the chassis attitude the same as lowering the front without cutting into scarce cornering clearance.

4) Speaking of cornering clearance, don't add crap that affects this like peg lowering plates, centerstand, lowering links, etc. My bike came to me with the remnants of centerstand hardware, but no centerstand, and I've never wanted to replace it.

5) The biggest upgrade you can make is in software: GET SOME TRAINING. 99.9999% of the equation is between the rider's ears. I can highly recommend Lee Parks' Total Control training:
Motorcyclist Training Courses | Total Control Training
In fast-paced street riding, it's 99.99% rider skill, as long as the bikes are working halfway decently. Highly skilled riders will make very nearly the exact same decisions no matter what bike they're on.


The biggest single issue you see on DLs is sag; Suzuki ships these things to North America with piss-weak springs inadequate for the weight of the bike, let alone a rider and luggage. Far too many DL riders are trundling around slowly in the lower third of the suspension travel, wondering why this thing handles like a truck.
 
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In fast-paced street riding, it's 99.99% rider skill, as long as the bikes are working halfway decently. Highly skilled riders will make very nearly the exact same decisions no matter what bike they're on...
Begs the question of why you're riding fast on the street, right?

The Pace Separating street from track, riding from racing

"The Pace focuses on bike control and de-emphasizes outright speed. Full-throttle acceleration and last minute braking aren't part of the program, effectively eliminating the two most common single-bike accident scenarios in sport riding."
 

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Discussion Starter #46
My formula:

1) Rear shock rebuilt, revalved and resprung by "Sasquatch". Excellent bang for the buck to get a rear end that works far better than stock. And of course there are assorted replacement shocks if you want to spend more.

2) Sonic straight-rate springs up front.

3) 5/8" (16mm) raising links out back. Keep the front at stock height. This corrects the chassis attitude the same as lowering the front without cutting into scarce cornering clearance.

4) Speaking of cornering clearance, don't add crap that affects this like peg lowering plates, centerstand, lowering links, etc. My bike came to me with the remnants of centerstand hardware, but no centerstand, and I've never wanted to replace it.

5) The biggest upgrade you can make is in software: GET SOME TRAINING. 99.9999% of the equation is between the rider's ears. I can highly recommend Lee Parks' Total Control training:
Motorcyclist Training Courses | Total Control Training
In fast-paced street riding, it's 99.99% rider skill, as long as the bikes are working halfway decently. Highly skilled riders will make very nearly the exact same decisions no matter what bike they're on.


The biggest single issue you see on DLs is sag; Suzuki ships these things to North America with piss-weak springs inadequate for the weight of the bike, let alone a rider and luggage. Far too many DL riders are trundling around slowly in the lower third of the suspension travel, wondering why this thing handles like a truck.
Thanks for the reply. I got a quote from Sas. Front springs are already budgeted if I go ahead with the purchase. Fork brace too. Revalve in the front Point 4, I would never limit my clearance even on sport bikes, 100% agreed. I went through every single training courses we had locally, including the racing course. I'm out of courses, but I am actually thinking about taking a refresher just for the sake of ....refreshing :)

Taking another Vee on a test ride, to verify if the brakes are lacking for me on not. Looks like I'll be joining the community soon.
 

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Keeping up with the sportbikes depends more on the rider than the bike. I've got video of a buddy at Deals Gap going around the outside of sportbikes on his V-Rod. He's a little crazy though.
If you go back in time CW thought the Gen 1 was one of the best handling street bikes out there with the upright position giving you lots of leverage. That said, if you're getting an old Vee with right-side up forks there are ways to make it handle better. Get some good street tires. Micheline Pilot Road 5's are my preference. I couldn't believe the difference that a fork brace makes, and using stock bars I added a crossbrace that also helped a lot (or you can just get better handlebars). I haven't done any suspension upgrades. I probably should, but the bike is 18 years old now, and options are limited. Does it handle like a sport bike? No. If you want a sportbike, then ride that and suffer with the downside. It does handle REALLY well though, and you'll be happier on long trips. Again, the rider makes all the difference on keeping up or falling back. At sane speeds you'll be just fine. On a V-Strom trip through Vermont years ago, I saw someone from here on a 650, 2-up, with a darkside car tire on the back, ride around EVERYONE up and down the twisty roads. Wouldn't believe it if I didn't see it.
 

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Begs the question of why you're riding fast on the street, right?

The Pace Separating street from track, riding from racing

"The Pace focuses on bike control and de-emphasizes outright speed. Full-throttle acceleration and last minute braking aren't part of the program, effectively eliminating the two most common single-bike accident scenarios in sport riding."

Yep, "The Pace" is pretty much exactly my overall street philosophy.

Any numpty can yank a throttle. I and the people I ride with are all about scratching that deep-down lean angle itch, but in a responsible way. Dirt sampling and ambulances really harsh the mellow, y'know?

This is an article I wrote a little while back about the Zen of leading a sporty ride:
 
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